35

I am writing a query to get all players for all teams. Instead of looping in the application, I decided to get the players of all teams in a single query using array_agg(). I have written the query as follows:

SELECT team_id, array_agg(team_name) AS teamname,
       array_agg(player_id||'##'||player_name) AS playerdetails
FROM team
INNER JOIN players ON team_id = player_team
GROUP BY team_id

This query gives me the result as below, in the result set the teamname is being repeated (exactly to the no. of players)

team_id             team_name                                                                   playerdetails
1       {Australia,Australia,Australia,Australia}                       {"5##Glenn Donald McGrath","6##Shane Warne","2##Steve Waugh","1##Adam Gilchrist"}
2       {India,India,India,India}                                       {"8##Kapil Dev","11##Saurav Ganguly","3##Rahul Dravid","9##Sachin Tendulkar"}
3       {"South Africa","South Africa","South Africa","South Africa"}   {"12##Gary Kristen","4##Shaun Pollock","7##Jacques Kallis","10##Alan Donald"}

Is there any way to return the result like this

team_id             team_name                                                                   playerdetails
1                   Australia                       {"5##Glenn Donald McGrath","6##Shane Warne","2##Steve Waugh","1##Adam Gilchrist"}

I have achieved it using a subquery, but want to know if its possible to write it without the subquery

SELECT team_id, teamname[1], playerdetails
FROM (
  SELECT team_id, array_agg(team_name) AS teamname,
         array_agg(player_id||'##'||player_name) AS playerdetails
  FROM team
  INNER JOIN players ON team_id = player_team
  GROUP BY team_id) AS tempresult  

The sqfiddle is here. And I am using Postgresql 8.4

[EDIT]
I was actually thinking of hack to the GROUP BY limitation column "team.team_status" must appear in the GROUP BY clause or be used in an aggregate function when try to retrieve the a column which was not been specified in group by

SELECT team_id, array_agg(team_name) AS teamname,
       array_agg(player_id||'##'||player_name) AS playerdetails,
       team_status -- could be replaced by something like array_agg(team_status)[0] or customfunction(team_status)
FROM team
INNER JOIN players ON team_id = player_team
GROUP BY team_id   
4
  • I think you can find this useful: stackoverflow.com/questions/3994556/…
    – user_0
    Commented Jun 23, 2015 at 8:09
  • Why do you want to do it without a sub-query?
    – Patrick
    Commented Jun 23, 2015 at 9:09
  • @Patrick First the question is based on some curiosity, I have tried to do it without much success.. and I think using subquery will be less efficient when considering large and complex queries on large datasets Commented Jun 23, 2015 at 9:15
  • Note that if you didn’t have to array_agg on player_id, you could discard the GROUP BY clause and just use first_value(team_name) OVER (PARTITION BY team_id ORDER BY team_name) in the SELECT. Commented Feb 8 at 9:54

3 Answers 3

67

It was actually a mistake from my part... the answer to my first question lies in that query itself. I just have to enclose the (array_agg(team_name))[1], earlier I tried it without the brackets.

SELECT team_id, (array_agg(team_name))[1] AS teamname,
     array_agg(player_id||'##'||player_name) AS playerdetails
FROM team
INNER JOIN players ON team_id = player_team
GROUP BY team_id
4
  • Wow. Thank you. This should really be the accepted answer. I can't create functions or add libraries, and I just need the first value and dont need to worry about duplicates.
    – Henry D
    Commented May 3, 2018 at 0:21
  • Thanks. If I want to get the last element in the aggregation array, is it applicable to use array_agg(team_name)[-1] or what method should I use? I have tried with [-1] but it didn't work though.
    – Tung Le
    Commented Jan 29, 2020 at 18:45
  • how to add multiple columns in order by in array_agg Commented Jun 22, 2021 at 6:30
  • Why do we need to add the parenthesis in the first place? array_agg returns an array of the argument type. Commented Aug 21, 2023 at 8:05
5

Very simply, do not aggregate the team_name but GROUP BY it:

SELECT team_id, team_name, array_agg(player_id||'##'||player_name) AS playerdetails
FROM team
JOIN players ON team_id = player_team
GROUP BY team_id, team_name;
4
  • I haven't thought of it actually, nice suggestion... but the fact is there are more tables to be joined and more select columns Commented Jun 23, 2015 at 8:41
  • Also I an expecting a generic function/implementation that can be used in other queries too.. Commented Jun 23, 2015 at 8:42
  • 2
    The above answers exactly your question, you can check in your own SQLFiddle. Of course, I cannot answer things you didn't ask about. So please edit your question or post a new question. What do you mean by "generic function/implementation", for instance?
    – Patrick
    Commented Jun 23, 2015 at 8:44
  • sorry about the confusion... I have updated the question Commented Jun 23, 2015 at 8:53
1
SELECT team_id, array_agg(DISTINCT team_name) AS teamname,
       array_agg(player_id||'##'||player_name) AS playerdetails
FROM team
INNER JOIN players ON team_id = player_team
GROUP BY team_id

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