3

I have a view which I want to look like this:

|---------------|
|               | <- navBar
|---------------|
|               | <- topView
|---------------|
|               |
|               |
|               |
|---------------|

Everything I want is to stick topView.top to navBar.bottom. I've decided to go with Cartography and implemented following code (trying to stick to MVC ofc):

In my UIViewController subclass:

override func viewWillLayoutSubviews() {
    super.viewWillLayoutSubviews()

    aView?.topLayoutGuide = self.topLayoutGuide // where aView is my subclass of UIView, inserted in loadView method
}

In my UIView subclass:

var topLayoutGuide: UILayoutSupport?

override func updateConstraints() {
    var constraint = NSLayoutConstraint?()
    layout(topView) { (topView) in
        constraint = topView.top == topView.superview!.top
    }
    topView.superview!.removeConstraint(constraint!)

    layout(topView) { topView in
        topView.top == topView.superview!.top + (self.topLayoutGuide?.length ?? 0)
        topView.height == 67
        topView.left == topView.superview!.left
        topView.width == topView.superview!.width
    }

    super.updateConstraints()
}

The problem is that I receive following logs and I have no idea how to fix it:

Unable to simultaneously satisfy constraints.
[...]
(
    "<NSLayoutConstraint:0x7fe6a64e4800 V:|-(64)-[UIView:0x7fe6a6505d80]   (Names: '|':MyApp.MyView:0x7fe6a360d4c0 )>",
    "<NSLayoutConstraint:0x7fe6a3538a80 V:|-(0)-[UIView:0x7fe6a6505d80]   (Names: '|':MyApp.MyView:0x7fe6a360d4c0 )>"
)

Seems I need some help. How to do it properly? I don't want to implement constraints in UIViewController and I don't want to use Storyboards.

Thanks for any help!

3

One solution: create a reference to that particular NSLayoutConstraint, and update its constant:

var topLayoutConstraint: NSLayoutConstraint!

override func updateConstraints() { 
    layout(topView) { topView in
        topLayoutConstraint = topView.top == topView.superview!.top
        topView.height == 67
        topView.left == topView.superview!.left
        topView.width == topView.superview!.width
    }

    super.updateConstraints()
}

... then later, you can adjust the constant of that NSLayoutConstraint like so:

topLayoutConstraint.constant = 50

The only question that's left is - when do you update the topLayoutConstraint? One solution is to create a protocol, MyViewInterface:

protocol MyViewInterface: class {
    var topLayoutGuideLength: CGFloat { get set }
}

Then, in our UIView, when that topLayoutGuideLength property is changed, we adjust the constant of our NSLayoutConstraint:

public class MyView: UIView, MyViewInterface {
    public var topLayoutGuideLength: CGFloat = 0 {
        didSet {
            topLayoutConstraint.constant = topLayoutGuideLength
        }
    }
}

Finally, in our UIViewController (where our topLayoutGuide lives):

public class myViewController: UIViewController {

    private var myView: MyView

    // ...

    public override func viewDidLayoutSubviews() {
        super.viewDidLayoutSubviews()

        myView.topLayoutGuideLength = topLayoutGuide.length
    }
}

The end result? Whenever viewDidLayoutSubviews() is triggered on our UIViewController, our myView's topLayoutGuideLength property is updated, which triggers a change in that topLayoutConstraint's constant.

| improve this answer | |
  • I've just resigned temporary from autolayouts and currently i'm setting the frames in layoutSubviews - this way there is no problem with topLayoutGuide. I can't test your solution, but I've tried something similar without result. I'm accepting this answer as it may be the proper solution ;). – Vive Jul 23 '15 at 8:06
  • 1
    Makes sense to me! I figured this question was a bit stale, but I was working on this same problem yesterday, came across your question, and the above code is what I used to handle it. Thanks for accepting! :) – bryanjclark Jul 23 '15 at 17:42
1

Another lack of documentation from cartography...

I came across topLayoutGuideCartography and bottomLayoutGuideCartography properties as a UIViewController extension in Cartography. Using them could give you the desired output without overriding viewDidLayoutSubviews

You can simply use this property to anchor your view's top.

override func updateConstraints() { 
    layout(topView) { topView in
       topView.top == topLayoutGuideCartography
       topView.height == 67
       topView.left == topView.superview!.left
       topView.width == topView.superview!.width
    }

    super.updateConstraints()
}
| improve this answer | |
  • It seems like a property of the view controller, what I've excluded as an answer in my question, am I right? Please read the question to the end. – Vive Nov 17 '16 at 4:11
  • Also, I can't see the difference between topLayoutGuide and topLayoutGuideCartography. They seem to be the same? Another thing is that I don't think you're right about overriding viewDidLayoutSubviews, as it is done to pass the value to the view, what you skip. And I want it in the view, so it's MVC or MVVM. – Vive Nov 17 '16 at 4:27
  • @Vive Normally you can't pass topLayoutGuide to anyView.top since they are not matching types. topLayoutGuideCartography is just a proxy. Also overriding viewDidLayoutSubviews is not necessary all the times. It might be because of the way I have written them. I am not updating them in updateConstraints as you do. Because the documentation itself also suggests to update them whenever needed. Everything is happening in my viewDidLoad here. This is a VC case as you can see. Might be different in View case. – erenkabakci Nov 17 '16 at 8:10
  • 1
    Of course you can pass it. You just declare var topLayoutGuide: UILayoutSupport? in the view and assign the value of topLayoutGuide in the VC. But I don't like this approach, as it's not MVC, MVVM nor any other proper pattern. I understand that worked for you, but in my question it's clearly stated: "I don't want to implement constraints in UIViewController". Anyway, nice finding with that topLayoutGuideCartography. It may be useful for people (I don't use this library any more). – Vive Nov 17 '16 at 8:20

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