3

I'm quite new in using List as arrays in C#. So I've encounter a problem while using it.

I'm trying to removed an int[] (integer array) from a List<int[]> using the Remove but failed to removed the int[] from the List<int[]>.

here is the code:

List<int[]> trash = new List<int[]>()
{
     new int[] {0,1},
     new int[] {1,0},
     new int[] {1,1}
};
int[] t1 =  {0,1};
trash.Remove(t1);

Is it just a bug? Or it doesn't recognize int[] ?

  • 1
    they are different objects. You have to remove by index or with the same reference – Andrea Jun 23 '15 at 8:23
  • Not a bug. You are trying to remove an array that isn't in the list. Your second try Console.WriteLine(t1 == trash[0]). They aren't the same. – Aron Jun 23 '15 at 8:23
  • 1
    Oh, Thank You Very much for ALL OF YOU. :D – Genesis Mallari Jun 23 '15 at 8:29
5

The problem is that every array type is a reference type and List removes items based on equality where equality for reference types is by default reference equality. That means, you have to remove the very same array as is in the list.

The following for example works perfectly well:

int[] t1 =  {0,1};
List<int[]> trash = new List<int[]>()
{
            t1,
            new int[] {1,0},
            new int[] {1,1}
};
trash.Remove(t1);
  • You mean removing the same array? You have to use references to the array you want to remove rather than recreate a new array with the same contents, just as shown in the code example. Alternative, you can use the index-based RemoveAt – Georg Jun 23 '15 at 8:28
  • what will happen if there are 2 int[] with the same value but the first one came from a outside the List<int[]> like what you did in the above answer? – Genesis Mallari Jun 23 '15 at 8:35
  • @GenesisMallari The values aren't important, only the references are. Do you really want to use int[]? Wouldn't a custom type (a struct, probably) be a better fit? You could then implement value equality the way you want. Or, use a different collection - if there's an obvious index, use a dictionary. If you only care about order, use a stack. – Luaan Jun 23 '15 at 9:04
  • this question is just a part of my other harder question. I thought that their is something that I'm missing, and yes you point it out. I'll just wait for 80 mins to ask another question. Thanks for your answer, it really helps a lot. – Genesis Mallari Jun 23 '15 at 9:11
  • 1
    @xanatos updated my answer – Georg Jun 23 '15 at 9:23
4

If you want to remove all the lists which have the same contents (in the same order) as a target list, you can do so using List.RemoveAll() along with Linq's SequenceEqual():

List<int[]> trash = new List<int[]>
{
    new [] {0, 1},
    new [] {1, 0},
    new [] {1, 1}
};

int[] t1 = {0, 1};

trash.RemoveAll(element => element.SequenceEqual(t1));

Console.WriteLine(trash.Count); // Prints 2

This is very slow though. Better to use an index if you can.

2

Error is List of array uses reference type data. therefore please use the removeAt method of List like below:

List<int[]> trash = new List<int[]>()
{
    new int[] {0,1},
    new int[] {1,0},
    new int[] {1,1}
};
trash.RemoveAt(0);

With RemoveAt you need to pass the index of integer array you want to remove from the list.

0

Your t1 variable is a new instance of the array. So it won't be equal to the first element in the list.

Try:

trash.Remove(trash[0]);

or

trash.RemoveAt(0);
  • In that case, the latter option is much better as the list does not have to search for the array. – Georg Jun 23 '15 at 8:25
0

The .Remove method looks the address of the element. If they are equal, then it removes. You should do like this.

int[] t1 =  {0,1};
int[] t2 =new int[] {1,0};
int[] t3 =new int[] {1,1};
List<int[]> trash = new List<int[]>()
{
     t1,t2,t3      
};

trash.Remove(t1);
0
foreach(var x in trash)
{
    if(x[0] == t1[0] && x[1] == t[1])
    {
        trash.Remove(x);
        break;
     }
}

this should work aswell

  • It does work, but is O(n²). You can improve this by doing an index-based search to O(n). – Georg Jun 23 '15 at 8:29
  • I think actually it is O(n*m) where n is List size and m is Array size – Andrea Jun 23 '15 at 8:36
  • I considered the array size to be constant, but if you want to take this one in, then it is of course O(n*m) against O(n²*m) – Georg Jun 23 '15 at 8:44
  • I don't understand why it should be n^2...can you give an example? – Andrea Jun 23 '15 at 8:47
  • The problem is that Remove is O(n), more precisely it is \Theta(n) and you call it O(n) times, amounting to O(n^2). RemoveAt is also not O(1) but O(n), but it only processes indices after i where i is its parameter. Thus you can show that this only sums up to O(n). – Georg Jun 23 '15 at 8:52
0

It is just because you are trying to remove item that is new.

Its address reference is different than the object that is already in list.That is why it is not remove.

Int is value type.. And Int[] is reference type..

So when you do it with Int list

List<int> trash = new List<int>(){ 1, 13, 5 };
int t1 = 13;
trash.Remove(t1);//it will removed

But for Int[]

List<int[]> trash = new List<int[]>()
{
    new int[] {0,1},
    new int[] {1,0},
    new int[] {1,1}
};
var t1 = {0,1};
trash.Remove(t1);//t1 will not removed because "t1" address reference is different than the "new int[] {0,1}" item that is in list.

To remove-

trash.Remove(trash.Find(a => a.SequenceEqual(t1)));

SequenceEqual() Determines whether two sequences are equal by comparing the elements by using the default equality comparer for their type.

  • well, it gave me the same fail result after adding a new int[] before the value. – Genesis Mallari Jun 23 '15 at 8:39
  • Now you can see my answer with description..and with your solution. :) – sangram parmar Jun 23 '15 at 8:53
0

If you want to remove the exact sequence, but you don't have the possibility to remove the exact object (sequence coming out from elsewhere) you can search for the right sequence using a lambda expression or an anonymous method:

List<int[]> trash = new List<int[]>
     {
         new [] {0, 1},
         new [] {1, 0},
         new [] {1, 1}
     };

int[] t1 = { 0, 1 };

//using anonymous method
trash.RemoveAll(delegate(int[] element) { return element.SequenceEqual(t1); });

//using lambda expression
trash.RemoveAll(element => element.SequenceEqual(t1));

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