3

Additionally to the answers 1, 2, 3 and GotW88, assume the following methods

QString createString()
{
    return QString("foobar");
}

const QString& getString()
{
    return createString();
}

This will yield the famous "warning C4172: returning address of local variable or temporary" with VS2013.

Now if i changed the second method to

const QString& getString()
{
    const QString& binder = createString();
    return binder;
}

Which does not report an error anymore. Is this a safe way to fix the warning without changing the signature of the API? Why does this work?

6
  • Why not have createString() simply return the pointer from a new QString? Then the caller owns the string, and can save, delete, or refer to it as needed.
    – donjuedo
    Jun 23, 2015 at 15:21
  • 3
    @donjuedo That is a horrible idea. There are no pointers involved and manually managing memory in such a situation is completely unwarranted.
    – pmr
    Jun 23, 2015 at 15:22
  • @pmr, with all due respect, I disagree. Creating the object, but with neither a variable name nor a pointer, leaves an awkward situation when it is time to use the new object.
    – donjuedo
    Jun 23, 2015 at 15:24
  • 2
    If you ever need to return something in a pointer, ALWAYS use a std::unique_ptr or std::shared_ptr (or any other alternative, e.g. from Boost) and return that smart pointer by a value. But in the code in the question it is much better to just return it by a value. Jun 23, 2015 at 15:32
  • @donjuedo QString is a pointer. To be exact it is a wrapper around a pointer. See: code.woboq.org/qt5/qtbase/src/corelib/tools/…
    – fjardon
    Jun 23, 2015 at 15:39

3 Answers 3

6

It doesn't work. That way you simply suppress the warning by making the situation harder to analyze. The behavior is still undefined.

6
  • Is there a way to make it work without changing the methods signature?
    – x29a
    Jun 23, 2015 at 15:21
  • 1
    @x29a: You have to bind the reference to something non-local and non-temporary. If you have something non-local and non-temporary that would work for that purpose, then go ahead an use it. A low-quality quick-fix would be to use an inner static variable of type QString. But returning a reference to an independently-living non-local and non-temporary entity generally make the function non-reenterable, which is not a good thing either. Jun 23, 2015 at 15:22
  • 1
    I guess the method has to return a copy then. Thanks!
    – x29a
    Jun 23, 2015 at 15:24
  • 3
    The QString has implemented a move constructor so you can return it by a value without worrying about performance. Jun 23, 2015 at 15:28
  • @MarianSpanik i know, i was more afraid of breaking any interface, but thinking about it a bit longer, i cant imagine a scenario where the method MUST return a reference and not a copy. Thanks though.
    – x29a
    Jun 23, 2015 at 15:40
2

Your "fix" doesn't.

To preserve the signature, you must make some tradeoffs. At the minimum, getString is not reentrant, and that can't be fixed other than returning a copy of the string. It is also not thread-safe, although that's fixable without changing the signature.

At a minimum, to preserve the signature you must retain the string yourself. A simple solution might look as follows:

const QString & getString() {
  static QString string = createString();
  return string;
}

Another approach would be to make the string a class member, if your function is really a method:

class Foo {
  QString m_getString_result;
public:
  const QString & getString() {
    m_getString_result = createString();
    return m_getString_result;
  }
};

For thread safety, you'd need to keep the result in thread local storage. That still wouldn't fix the reentrancy issue - as such, it's not fixable given the signature that you have.

1

This behavior is undefined.

const QString& getString()
    {
        const QString& binder = createString();
        return binder;
    }

Once binder goes out of scope. It is not defined any more. You can make it defined by keeping the binder alive.

1
  • please note his createString() returns a QString, not a QString&
    – donjuedo
    Jun 23, 2015 at 15:29

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