5
<!doctype>
<html>
<head>
    <style>
        div {
           background:rgba(0,255,255,0.3);
        }
        #div1 {
           width:300px;
           height:300px;           
        }
        #div2 {
           width:200px;
           height:200px;          
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="div1"><div id="div2"></div></div><br/>
</body>

what is the actually computed transparency of div2? I am confused. It is a unknown number that is not 0.3+0.3 or 0.3+0.3*0.3

6

The sum of alpha channels can be calculated as:

alpha_top + alpha_bottom * (1 - alpha_top) =
0.3 + 0.3 * (1 - 0.3) =
0.3 + 0.3 * 0.7 =
0.3 + 0.21 =
0.51

For more explanation, see Alpha Compositing @ wikipedia, which lists the formula as:

formula

or

formula

This is essentially the same formula used by Bogdan Kuštan and it can also be found in this answer by bwoebi.

0

Since you have applied opacity in div{} then this would be .3 for #div1{} and .3 * .3 = .09 for #div2{} as #div1 has opacity value .3 and #div2 also use opacity but is currently holding .3 so it's going to be multiplied for children.

  • I tried it in photoshop and i was able to get the same color using 51% as the opacity – passatgt Jun 23 '15 at 19:09
  • Did you try using opacity .3 on first layer and .3 on second layer? This will be similar as you wrote in css. But effectively, 51% may find the color as css too. – Bhojendra Rauniyar Jun 23 '15 at 19:11
  • sorry, I can't check link. Try what I say in photoshop. – Bhojendra Rauniyar Jun 23 '15 at 19:13
  • Incidentally, .3 * .3 = .09 – showdev Jun 23 '15 at 19:30
0

its

(0.3 + 0.3) - (0.3 * 0.3) = 0.51

First You need to add overlapping transparency values, and subtract their multiplication. Why? I don't know. I don't event know how I know it, it just one of those things like letter spacing from PhotoShop to CSS, You need to divide PS value from 1000, and You get value in ems. Sorry for offtopic.

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