19

Scenario: I am using OkHttp / Retrofit to access a web service: multiple HTTP requests are sent out at the same time. At some point the auth token expires, and multiple requests will get a 401 response.

Issue: In my first implementation I use an interceptor (here simplified) and each thread tries to refresh the token. This leads to a mess.

public class SignedRequestInterceptor implements Interceptor {

    @Override
    public Response intercept(Chain chain) throws IOException {
        Request request = chain.request();

        // 1. sign this request
        request = request.newBuilder()
                    .header(AUTH_HEADER_KEY, BEARER_HEADER_VALUE + token)
                    .build();


        // 2. proceed with the request
        Response response = chain.proceed(request);

        // 3. check the response: have we got a 401?
        if (response.code() == HttpURLConnection.HTTP_UNAUTHORIZED) {

            // ... try to refresh the token
            newToken = mAuthService.refreshAccessToken(..);


            // sign the request with the new token and proceed
            Request newRequest = request.newBuilder()
                                .removeHeader(AUTH_HEADER_KEY)
                                .addHeader(AUTH_HEADER_KEY, BEARER_HEADER_VALUE + newToken.getAccessToken())
                                .build();

            // return the outcome of the newly signed request
            response = chain.proceed(newRequest);

        }

        return response;
    }
}

Desired solution: All threads should wait for one single token refresh: the first failing request triggers the refresh, and together with the other requests waits for the new token.

What is a good way to proceed about this? Can some built-in features of OkHttp (like the Authenticator) be of help? Thank you for any hint.

11

You should not use interceptors or implement the retry logic yourself as this leads to a maze of recursive issues.

Instead implement the okhttp's Authenticator which is provided specifically to solve this problem:

okHttpClient.setAuthenticator(...);
1
  • 3
    unless backend team supports you... :'( – silentsudo Sep 17 '17 at 11:45
9

I had the same problem and I managed to solve it using a ReentrantLock.

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.HttpURLConnection;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.Lock;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantLock;

import okhttp3.Interceptor;
import okhttp3.Request;
import okhttp3.Response;
import timber.log.Timber;

public class RefreshTokenInterceptor implements Interceptor {

    private Lock lock = new ReentrantLock();

    @Override
    public Response intercept(Interceptor.Chain chain) throws IOException {

        Request request = chain.request();
        Response response = chain.proceed(request);

        if (response.code() == HttpURLConnection.HTTP_UNAUTHORIZED) {

            // first thread will acquire the lock and start the refresh token
            if (lock.tryLock()) {
                Timber.i("refresh token thread holds the lock");

                try {
                    // this sync call will refresh the token and save it for 
                    // later use (e.g. sharedPreferences)
                    authenticationService.refreshTokenSync();
                    Request newRequest = recreateRequestWithNewAccessToken(chain);
                    return chain.proceed(newRequest);
                } catch (ServiceException exception) {
                    // depending on what you need to do you can logout the user at this 
                    // point or throw an exception and handle it in your onFailure callback
                    return response;
                } finally {
                    Timber.i("refresh token finished. release lock");
                    lock.unlock();
                }

            } else {
                Timber.i("wait for token to be refreshed");
                lock.lock(); // this will block the thread until the thread that is refreshing 
                             // the token will call .unlock() method
                lock.unlock();
                Timber.i("token refreshed. retry request");
                Request newRequest = recreateRequestWithNewAccessToken(chain);
                return chain.proceed(newRequest);
            }
        } else {
            return response;
        }
    }

    private Request recreateRequestWithNewAccessToken(Chain chain) {
        String freshAccessToken = sharedPreferences.getAccessToken();
        Timber.d("[freshAccessToken] %s", freshAccessToken);
        return chain.request().newBuilder()
                .header("access_token", freshAccessToken)
                .build();
    }
}

The main advantage of using this solution is that you can write an unit test using mockito and test it. You will have to enable Mockito Incubating feature for mocking final classes (response from okhttp). Read more about here. The test looks something like this:

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
public class RefreshTokenInterceptorTest {

    private static final String FRESH_ACCESS_TOKEN = "fresh_access_token";

    @Mock
    AuthenticationService authenticationService;

    @Mock
    RefreshTokenStorage refreshTokenStorage;

    @Mock
    Interceptor.Chain chain;

    @BeforeClass
    public static void setup() {
        Timber.plant(new Timber.DebugTree() {

            @Override
            protected void log(int priority, String tag, String message, Throwable t) {
                System.out.println(Thread.currentThread() + " " + message);
            }
        });
    }

    @Test
    public void refreshTokenInterceptor_works_as_expected() throws IOException, InterruptedException {

        Response unauthorizedResponse = createUnauthorizedResponse();
        when(chain.proceed((Request) any())).thenReturn(unauthorizedResponse);
        when(authenticationService.refreshTokenSync()).thenAnswer(new Answer<Boolean>() {
            @Override
            public Boolean answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) throws Throwable {
                //refresh token takes some time
                Thread.sleep(10);
                return true;
            }
        });
        when(refreshTokenStorage.getAccessToken()).thenReturn(FRESH_ACCESS_TOKEN);
        Request fakeRequest = createFakeRequest();
        when(chain.request()).thenReturn(fakeRequest);

        final Interceptor interceptor = new RefreshTokenInterceptor(authenticationService, refreshTokenStorage);

        Timber.d("5 requests try to refresh token at the same time");
        final CountDownLatch countDownLatch5 = new CountDownLatch(5);
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            new Thread(new Runnable() {
                @Override
                public void run() {
                    try {
                        interceptor.intercept(chain);
                        countDownLatch5.countDown();
                    } catch (IOException e) {
                        throw new RuntimeException(e);
                    }
                }
            }).start();
        }
        countDownLatch5.await();

        verify(authenticationService, times(1)).refreshTokenSync();


        Timber.d("next time another 3 threads try to refresh the token at the same time");
        final CountDownLatch countDownLatch3 = new CountDownLatch(3);
        for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
            new Thread(new Runnable() {
                @Override
                public void run() {
                    try {
                        interceptor.intercept(chain);
                        countDownLatch3.countDown();
                    } catch (IOException e) {
                        throw new RuntimeException(e);
                    }
                }
            }).start();
        }
        countDownLatch3.await();

        verify(authenticationService, times(2)).refreshTokenSync();


        Timber.d("1 thread tries to refresh the token");
        interceptor.intercept(chain);

        verify(authenticationService, times(3)).refreshTokenSync();
    }

    private Response createUnauthorizedResponse() throws IOException {
        Response response = mock(Response.class);
        when(response.code()).thenReturn(401);
        return response;
    }

    private Request createFakeRequest() {
        Request request = mock(Request.class);
        Request.Builder fakeBuilder = createFakeBuilder();
        when(request.newBuilder()).thenReturn(fakeBuilder);
        return request;
    }

    private Request.Builder createFakeBuilder() {
        Request.Builder mockBuilder = mock(Request.Builder.class);
        when(mockBuilder.header("access_token", FRESH_ACCESS_TOKEN)).thenReturn(mockBuilder);
        return mockBuilder;
    }

}
4
  • 1
    Thanks! This solution also good in case when "expired token" error-code is not 401. Just Like in my case (don't say, back-end team doesn't listen me) – borichellow Nov 8 '16 at 16:30
  • 1
    i agree, some stub-born thinks client can do anything – silentsudo Sep 17 '17 at 11:45
  • Use Synchronized lock instead – Mubarak Tahir Apr 5 at 16:08
  • it works greats! – Frank Apr 10 at 16:06
8

Thanks for your answers - they led me to the solution. I ended up using a ConditionVariable lock and an AtomicBoolean. Here's how you can achieve this: read through the comments.

/**
 * This class has two tasks:
 * 1) sign requests with the auth token, when available
 * 2) try to refresh a new token
 */
public class SignedRequestInterceptor implements Interceptor {

    // these two static variables serve for the pattern to refresh a token
    private final static ConditionVariable LOCK = new ConditionVariable(true);
    private static final AtomicBoolean mIsRefreshing = new AtomicBoolean(false);

    ...

    @Override
    public Response intercept(@NonNull Chain chain) throws IOException {
        Request request = chain.request();

        // 1. sign this request
        ....

        // 2. proceed with the request
        Response response = chain.proceed(request);

        // 3. check the response: have we got a 401?
        if (response.code() == HttpURLConnection.HTTP_UNAUTHORIZED) {

            if (!TextUtils.isEmpty(token)) {
                /*
                *  Because we send out multiple HTTP requests in parallel, they might all list a 401 at the same time.
                *  Only one of them should refresh the token, because otherwise we'd refresh the same token multiple times
                *  and that is bad. Therefore we have these two static objects, a ConditionVariable and a boolean. The
                *  first thread that gets here closes the ConditionVariable and changes the boolean flag.
                */
                if (mIsRefreshing.compareAndSet(false, true)) {
                    LOCK.close();

                    // we're the first here. let's refresh this token.
                    // it looks like our token isn't valid anymore.
                    mAccountManager.invalidateAuthToken(AuthConsts.ACCOUNT_TYPE, token);

                    // do we have an access token to refresh?
                    String refreshToken = mAccountManager.getUserData(account, HorshaAuthenticator.KEY_REFRESH_TOKEN);

                    if (!TextUtils.isEmpty(refreshToken)) {
                        .... // refresh token
                    }
                    LOCK.open();
                    mIsRefreshing.set(false);
                } else {
                    // Another thread is refreshing the token for us, let's wait for it.
                    boolean conditionOpened = LOCK.block(REFRESH_WAIT_TIMEOUT);

                    // If the next check is false, it means that the timeout expired, that is - the refresh
                    // stuff has failed. The thread in charge of refreshing the token has taken care of
                    // redirecting the user to the login activity.
                    if (conditionOpened) {

                        // another thread has refreshed this for us! thanks!
                        ....
                        // sign the request with the new token and proceed

                        // return the outcome of the newly signed request
                        response = chain.proceed(newRequest);
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        // check if still unauthorized (i.e. refresh failed)
        if (response.code() == HttpURLConnection.HTTP_UNAUTHORIZED) {
            ... // clean your access token and prompt user for login again.
        }

        // returning the response to the original request
        return response;
    }
}
4
  • 1
    Could you please update your code with this solution ? i need to do something similar. – user2641570 Jul 23 '15 at 17:26
  • 6
    I downvoted because this is a poor answer without any code on how you actually solved your issue. – Austyn Mahoney Nov 24 '15 at 23:24
  • @user2641570 I am sorry I didn't see this before. Code is there (although you probably solved the issue already). – ticofab May 12 '16 at 7:15
  • @AustynMahoney you were totally right. I'm sorry I only saw this now. Added code with comments. – ticofab May 12 '16 at 7:15
1

If you wan't your threads to bock while the first one refresh the token you can use a synchronized block.

private final static Object lock = new Object();
private static long lastRefresh;

...
synchronized(lock){ // lock all thread untill token is refreshed
   // only the first thread does the w refresh
   if(System.currentTimeMillis()-lastRefresh>600000){ 
      token = refreshToken();
      lastRefresh=System.currentTimeMillis();
   }
}

Here 600000 (10 min) is arbitrary this number should be big enouth to prevent muliple refresh call and smaller than your token expiration time so that you call the refresh when the token expires.

0

Edited for thread safety

Havent looked at OkHttp or retrofit but how about having a static flag that is set as soon as a token fails and check for that flag before you request a new token?

private static AtomicBoolean requestingToken = new AtomicBoolean(false);

//..... 
if (requestingToken.get() == false)
 {
    requestingToken.set(true);
    //.... request a new token
 }
4
  • 1
    Your solution doesn't lock all threads. This means that the first thread will refresh the token and the others won't refresh the token and remake their previous call with the old token. – user2641570 Jun 24 '15 at 9:18
  • @user2641570 would adding a while loop in an else block that terminates when a token is valid be a good way to go? – Antwan Kakki Jun 24 '15 at 9:24
  • No. You need to use an some thread synchronisation mechanism like synchronized block or locks. Otherwise your threads would be looping using cpu for no reason. Take a look at my answer for an example. – user2641570 Jun 24 '15 at 9:44
  • Take a look at docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency. It details everything there is to know about java concurency. – user2641570 Jun 24 '15 at 11:17

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