5

I was testing some Java8 streams API codes, but i can't figure out what is happening with this one.

I was thinking about ParallelStream and how this works and i made some comparisons. Two different methods that do a big iteration adding 32.768.000 BigDecimals, one using ParallelStream, other using normal iteration. I came with a test that i know it's invalid, but some things called my attention.

The tests are:

Parallel stream:

private static void sumWithParallelStream() {
    BigDecimal[] list = new BigDecimal[32_768_000];
    BigDecimal total = BigDecimal.ZERO;
    for (int i = 0; i < 32_768_000; i++) {
        list[i] = new BigDecimal(i);
    }
    total = Arrays.asList(list).parallelStream().reduce(BigDecimal.ZERO, BigDecimal::add);
    System.out.println("Total: " + total);
}

Normal code:

private static void sequenceSum() {
    BigDecimal total = BigDecimal.ZERO;
    for (int i = 0; i < 32_768_000; i++) {
        total = total.add(new BigDecimal(i));
    }
    System.out.println("Total: " + total);
}

Output is:

Total: 536870895616000
sumWithParallelStream(): 30502 ms

Total: 536870895616000
sequenceSum(): 271 ms

Then i tried removing parallelStream:

 private static void sumWithParallelStream() {
    BigDecimal[] list = new BigDecimal[32_768_000];
    BigDecimal total = BigDecimal.ZERO;
    for (int i = 0; i < 32_768_000; i++) {
        list[i] = new BigDecimal(i);
        total = total.add(list[i]);
    }
    System.out.println("Total: " + total);
}

See that the sequenceSum() method is the same

The new output:

Total: 536870895616000
sumWithParallelStream(): 13487 ms

Total: 536870895616000
sequenceSum(): 879 ms

I have made these changes, adding and removing the parallelStream method many times and the results of sequenceSum() never change, always something about 200when using parallelStream on the other method, and something about 800 when not using. Testing in Windows and Ubuntu.

Finally, two questions remains for me, why the use of parallelStream on the first method influences on the second one? Why storing BigDecimals on array made the first method too much slow (800 ms to 13000 ms) ?

  • 1
    Try calling the methods in the other order. First sequenceSum() and then sumWithParallelStream(). – Kayaman Jun 24 '15 at 11:49
  • You do two very different things. When you use the parallel method you have a additional iteration over the entire list. Of course that takes longer. – Nitram Jun 24 '15 at 11:49
  • 4
    @Nitram I believe he was asking why the other method affects the runtime of sequenceSum(). For which I'd say "JIT probably". – Kayaman Jun 24 '15 at 11:50
  • adding on the "JIT probably"-train of arguments: when generating new objects in a loop body it makes all the difference if you store that object to an array external to the loop (JIT will probably allocate each object in memory) or not (JIT will probably re-use a single allocated object in the loop body) – BeyelerStudios Jun 24 '15 at 11:53
  • 5
    An array of 32M BigDecimals requires lots of memory. GC must be the issue. Rerun the test case with -XX:+PrintGCDetails. – apangin Jun 24 '15 at 16:55
3

In the first example you are allocating an array of 32,768,000 elements then streaming over it. That array allocation and memory fetching isn't needed and is probably what's slowing the method down.

IntStream.range(0, limit).parallel()
   .mapToObj(BigDecimal::new)
   .reduce(BigDecimal.ZERO, BigDecimal::add);
  • wow...can't believe I have been coding in java 8 for a while and totally missed that function, thanks. – dolan Dec 22 '15 at 17:11
  • Sorry, the answer here is on comments, I will write an answer. – Jean Jung Jan 14 '16 at 15:59
0

As pointed in the comments by @apangin, the issue is with GC.

I used -XX:+PrintGCDetails parameter to print the execution times of GC and with parallelStream they were worst, maybe because the initalization of the Streams API more memory was allocated.

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