12

I have the following lines in my code. They are taking more place than they should. Any suggestions for a smaller code.

string longestString;
string shortestString;
if (string1.Length > string2.Length) 
{
   longestString = string1;
   shortestString = string2;
}
else 
{
   longestString = string2;
   shortestString = string1;
}

I know, not a really important question, but this is taking 2/3 of the entire method and not the important stuff.

10
  • 5
    longString = string1.Length > string2.Length ? string1 : string2; Jun 24, 2015 at 14:09
  • 2
    that is the right way to do it. Some things can't be really aesthetical
    – xanatos
    Jun 24, 2015 at 14:09
  • 1
    Absolutely not effective, but just for fun: var lst = new[] { string1, string2 }.OrderBy(s => s.Length).ToList(); string shortestString = lst[0]; string longestString = lst[1];
    – Me.Name
    Jun 24, 2015 at 14:17
  • 3
    It's kinda odd how these questions suddenly receive so much attention. It's not even a proper StackOverflow question! The code works and optimization is not an issue, meaning this actually belongs to CodeReview.
    – Dion V.
    Jun 24, 2015 at 14:29
  • 4
    @DionV. In its current state, it would be closed as off-topic hypothetical/example code on Code Review. CR requires real code and as much context as possible. Who knows why OP needs to do this? Could be an X-Y thing. Jun 24, 2015 at 14:34

4 Answers 4

17

Perhaps:

int diff = string1.Length.CompareTo(string2.Length);
string longestString  = diff > 0 ? string1 : string2;
string shortestString = diff > 0 ? string2 : string1; 

But if you have more than these two strings and you want a general solution you could use:

var lenLookup = new[] { string1, string2 }.OrderBy(s => s.Length).ToList();
string shortestString = lenLookup.First();
string longestString = lenLookup.Last();
3
  • 1
    Interesting (and very correct in the most general case) that you chose to cache the "real" comparison, instead of redoing it twice :-) In this way, the number of accesses to string1 and string2 is the same as in the original code... so it is "more equivalent".
    – xanatos
    Jun 24, 2015 at 14:22
  • 1
    Or equivalent: bool s1bigger = string1.Length > string2.Length; string logestString = s1bigger ? string1 : string2; ...
    – xanatos
    Jun 24, 2015 at 14:24
  • Well, since it turned out that I also needed to 'pre-process' the string. I actually used this one. var cleaned = new[] { original, modified } .Select(s => Regex.Replace(s, "[^a-zA-Z]", "").ToLower()) .OrderBy(s => s.Length); var shortest = cleaned.First(); var longest = cleaned.Last(); Jun 25, 2015 at 8:04
11

Since your code would always perform either the if or else path, pick one as "default" and merge it with variable declaration:

string longestString = string2
string shortestString = string1;
if (string1.Length > string2.Length) 
{
   longestString = string1;
   shortestString = string2;
}

Bonus points for the fact that you'll actually initialize those variables.

4
  • 2
    With the caveat that this works well if string1 and string2 don't cause side-effects when getted.
    – xanatos
    Jun 24, 2015 at 14:13
  • Re-reading the OP i'm positive this wouldn't introduce any additional side effect (original code would also always get both strings)
    – Alex
    Jun 24, 2015 at 14:15
  • Yep... This is just putting the dot on the i and the dash on the t... i.e. being pedantic.
    – xanatos
    Jun 24, 2015 at 14:18
  • 2
    @xanatos If a getter is causing side effects, then you have a much bigger problem...
    – Kaslai
    Jun 24, 2015 at 17:29
6

Well, you could do this to clear your method up;

public string GetLongestString(string str1, string str2)
{
    return str1.Length > str2.Length ? str1 : str2;
}

public string GetShortestString(string str1, string str2)
{
    return str1.Length > str2.Length ? str2 : str1;
}

string longestString = GetLongestString(string1, string2);
string shortestString = GetShortestString(string1, string2);

And reuse it whenever you want!

Heck, make it even cooler (in co-op mode with Tim);

public IEnumerable<string> GetLongestStrings(params string[] strings)
{
    //returns first string with largest length out of given argumenst
    int maxSize = strings.Max(str => str.Length);
    return strings.Where(s => s.Length == maxSize);
}

public IEnumerable<string> GetShortestStrings(params string[] strings)
{
    //returns first string with shortest length out of given arguments
    int minSize = strings.Min(str => str.Length);
    return strings.Where(s => s.Length == minSize);
}

Usage;

string longestString = GetLongestStrings("str1", "str2", /*...*/ "strN").FirstOrDefault();

EDIT1: My first implementation is not the most efficient. As Tim suggested;

public string GetLongestString(params string[] strings)
{
    return strings.OrderBy(s => s.Length).First();
}

public string GetShortestString(params string[] strings)
{
    return strings.OrderByDescending(s => s.Length).First();
}

Usage;

string longestString = GetLongestString("str1", "str2", /*...*/ "strN");
5
  • 1
    I think this is the best answer Jun 24, 2015 at 14:24
  • But this enumerates the strings twice. Once to determine the min-/max-length and once to find the string with that length. You could simply use strings.OrderBy(s => s.Length).First() Jun 24, 2015 at 14:41
  • @TimSchmelter indeed. OrderBy would be a better option, but since you provided that in your answer, I'm not going to take credit for it.
    – Dion V.
    Jun 24, 2015 at 14:42
  • 1
    @DionV.; however, the params approach is nice. Since it's possible that there are multiple strings with the same min/max-length you could improve it by returning an IEnumerable<String>, so strings.Where(s => s.Length == minSize). Then the caller can decide what he wants to do with it, if he uses GetShortestString(..).FirstOrDefault() or string.Join(",", GetShortestString(..)). Jun 24, 2015 at 14:46
  • @TimSchmelter That's an even neater approach! I'd argue that it does depend a bit on what the OP needs though. If it's only the first longest string he needs, I'd suggest he just keeps it simple. But still, returning the enumerable fits more needs.
    – Dion V.
    Jun 24, 2015 at 14:53
1

You can use "? :" operator

string longestString = string1.Length > string2.Length ? string1 : string2;
string shortestString = string1.Length > string2.Length ? string2 : string1;
1
  • @xanatos please look more carefully at the second part of the statement: "string2 : string1" Jun 24, 2015 at 14:40

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