22

Get the value from a nested dictionary with the help of key path, here is the dict:

json = {
    "app": {
        "Garden": {
            "Flowers": {
                "Red flower": "Rose",
                "White Flower": "Jasmine",
                "Yellow Flower": "Marigold"
            }
        },
        "Fruits": {
            "Yellow fruit": "Mango",
            "Green fruit": "Guava",
            "White Flower": "groovy"
        },
        "Trees": {
            "label": {
                "Yellow fruit": "Pumpkin",
                "White Flower": "Bogan"
            }
        }
    }

The input parameter to the method is the key path with dots separated, from the key path = "app.Garden.Flowers.white Flower" need to print 'Jasmine'. My code so far:

import json
with open('data.json') as data_file:    
  j = json.load(data_file)


def find(element, JSON):     
  paths = element.split(".")  
  # print JSON[paths[0]][paths[1]][paths[2]][paths[3]]
  for i in range(0,len(paths)):
    data = JSON[paths[i]]
    # data = data[paths[i+1]]
    print data



find('app.Garden.Flowers.White Flower',j)

8 Answers 8

52

This is an instance of a fold. You can either write it concisely like this:

from functools import reduce
import operator

def find(element, json):
    return reduce(operator.getitem, element.split('.'), json)

Or more Pythonically (because reduce() is frowned upon due to poor readability) like this:

def find(element, json):
    keys = element.split('.')
    rv = json
    for key in keys:
        rv = rv[key]
    return rv

j = {"app": {
    "Garden": {
        "Flowers": {
            "Red flower": "Rose",
            "White Flower": "Jasmine",
            "Yellow Flower": "Marigold"
        }
    },
    "Fruits": {
        "Yellow fruit": "Mango",
        "Green fruit": "Guava",
        "White Flower": "groovy"
    },
    "Trees": {
        "label": {
            "Yellow fruit": "Pumpkin",
            "White Flower": "Bogan"
        }
    }
}}
print find('app.Garden.Flowers.White Flower', j)
3
  • 1
    Instead of defining your own item-getter function using lambda, you can import operator and use operator.getitem. Oct 31, 2017 at 21:37
  • 1
    If you want to address an item by an integer index (app.Garden.Flowers.0), you may change your for-loop like this: try: rv = rv[int(key)] except: rv = rv[key] – n.r. 4 mins ago Edit
    – n.r.
    Apr 21, 2021 at 19:58
  • 1
    this solution doesnt support list ,If you change Flowers to be list - u get an error
    – AviC
    Jan 10 at 10:41
8

I was in a similar situation and found this dpath module. Nice and easy.

2
  • Very cool. What I was hoping for, however, is that there's a way to do something like s = "%('red/buggy/bumpers')s" % { "red": { "buggy": { "bumpers":"foo" }}}. But I suppose it's better to use a proper templating language than to change the behaviour of the % operator on a string. 😉 Oct 15, 2018 at 19:43
  • I mean you could determine that the substring starting with '{' and ending with '}' is a dictionary. The run that substring through the eval() method which turns it into a dictionary object. Then split your '/' delimited path and apply the keys using a for loop Feb 12, 2021 at 3:38
4

I suggest you to use python-benedict, a python dict subclass with full keypath support and many utility methods.

You just need to cast your existing dict:

d = benedict(json)
# now your keys support dotted keypaths
print(d['app.Garden.Flower.White Flower'])

Here the library and the documentation: https://github.com/fabiocaccamo/python-benedict

Note: I am the author of this project

3

Your code heavily depends on no dots every occurring in the key names, which you might be able to control, but not necessarily.

I would go for a generic solution using a list of element names and then generate the list e.g. by splitting a dotted list of key names:

class ExtendedDict(dict):
    """changes a normal dict into one where you can hand a list
    as first argument to .get() and it will do a recursive lookup
    result = x.get(['a', 'b', 'c'], default_val)
    """
    def multi_level_get(self, key, default=None):
        if not isinstance(key, list):
            return self.get(key, default)
        # assume that the key is a list of recursively accessible dicts
        def get_one_level(key_list, level, d):
            if level >= len(key_list):
                if level > len(key_list):
                    raise IndexError
                return d[key_list[level-1]]
            return get_one_level(key_list, level+1, d[key_list[level-1]])

        try:
            return get_one_level(key, 1, self)
        except KeyError:
            return default

    get = multi_level_get # if you delete this, you can still use the multi_level-get

Once you have this class it is easy to just transform your dict and get "Jasmine":

json = {
        "app": {
            "Garden": {
                "Flowers": {
                    "Red flower": "Rose",
                    "White Flower": "Jasmine",
                    "Yellow Flower": "Marigold"
                }
            },
            "Fruits": {
                "Yellow fruit": "Mango",
                "Green fruit": "Guava",
                "White Flower": "groovy"
            },
            "Trees": {
                "label": {
                    "Yellow fruit": "Pumpkin",
                    "White Flower": "Bogan"
                }
            }
        }
    }

j = ExtendedDict(json)
print j.get('app.Garden.Flowers.White Flower'.split('.'))

will get you:

Jasmine

Like with a normal get() from a dict, you get None if the key (list) you specified doesn't exists anywhere in the tree, and you can specify a second parameter as return value instead of None

2

Very close. You need to (as you had in your comment) recursively go through the main JSON object. You can accomplish that by storing the result of the outermost key/value, then using that to get the next key/value, etc. till you're out of paths.

def find(element, JSON):     
  paths = element.split(".")
  data = JSON
  for i in range(0,len(paths)):
    data = data[paths[i]]
  print data

You still need to watch out for KeyErrors though.

2

one-liner:

from functools import reduce

a = {"foo" : { "bar" : "blah" }}
path = "foo.bar"

reduce(lambda acc,i: acc[i], path.split('.'), a)
0
2

Option 1: pyats library from Cisco [its a c extension]

  • Its quick and Super fast (measure it with timeit if required)
  • Javascript-ish usage [Bracket lookup ,dotted lookup, combined lookup]
  • Dotted Lookup for missing key raises Attribute error, bracket or default python dict lookup gives KeyError.
pip install pyats pyats-datastructures pyats-utils
from pyats.datastructures import NestedAttrDict
item = {"specifications": {"os": {"value": "Android"}}}
path = "specifications.os.value"
x = NestedAttrDict(item)
print(x[path])# prints Android
print(x['specifications'].os.value)# prints Android
print(x['specifications']['os']['value'])#prints Android
print(x['specifications'].os.value1)# raises Attribute Error

Option 2:pyats.utils chainget

  • super fast (measure it with timeit if required)
from pyats.utils import utils
item = {"specifications": {"os": {"value": "Android"}}}
path = "specifications.os.value"
path1 = "specifications.os.value1"
print(utils.chainget(item,path))# prints android (string version)
print(utils.chainget(item,path.split('.')))# prints android(array version)
print(utils.chainget(item,path1))# raises KeyError

Option 3: python without external library

  1. Better speed in comparison to lambda.
  2. Separate Error handling not required as in lambda and other cases.
  3. Readable and concise can be a utils function/helper in the project
from functools import reduce
item = {"specifications": {"os": {"value": "Android"}}}
path1 = "specifications.family.value"
path2 = "specifications.family.value1"

def test1():
    print(reduce(dict.get, path1.split('.'), item))

def test2():
    print(reduce(dict.get, path2.split('.'), item))

test1() # prints Android
test2() # prints None
0

Wrote function that works with lists in dict.

d = {'test': [
    {'value1': 'val'},
    {'value1': 'val2'}]}


def find_element(keys: list, dictionary: dict):
    rv = dictionary
    if isinstance(dictionary, dict):
        rv = find_element(keys[1:], rv[keys[0]])
    elif isinstance(dictionary, list):
        if keys[0].isnumeric():
            rv = find_element(keys[1:], dictionary[int(keys[0])])
    else:
        return rv
    return rv


val = find_element('test.1.value1'.split('.'), d)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.