134

Is there a display formatter that will output decimals as these string representations in c# without doing any rounding?

// decimal -> string

20 -> 20
20.00 -> 20
20.5 -> 20.5
20.5000 -> 20.5
20.125 -> 20.125
20.12500 -> 20.125
0.000 -> 0

{0.#} will round, and using some Trim type function will not work with a bound numeric column in a grid.

14 Answers 14

176

Do you have a maximum number of decimal places you'll ever need to display? (Your examples have a max of 5).

If so, I would think that formatting with "0.#####" would do what you want.

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var dList = new decimal[] { 20, 20.00m, 20.5m, 20.5000m, 20.125m, 20.12500m, 0.000m };

        foreach (var d in dList)
            Console.WriteLine(d.ToString("0.#####"));
    }
3
  • 5
    And you can always throw an exorbitant* number of # symbols at the format. *not scientific Commented Jun 23, 2010 at 20:43
  • 3
    +1 - incidentally, you don't need the leading #. "0.#####" works identically. And either way, this does round away from zero (just FYI).
    – TrueWill
    Commented Jul 26, 2010 at 22:44
  • 15
    @TrueWill Actually it does make a difference. d==0.1m then "0.#" renders "0.1" and "#.#" renders ".1" without the leading 0. Neither is wrong or right, just depends on what you want.
    – AaronLS
    Commented Dec 20, 2012 at 22:14
47

I just learned how to properly use the G format specifier. See the MSDN Documentation. There is a note a little way down that states that trailing zeros will be preserved for decimal types when no precision is specified. Why they would do this I do not know, but specifying the maximum number of digits for our precision should fix that problem. So for formatting decimals, G29 is the best bet.

decimal test = 20.5000m;
test.ToString("G"); // outputs 20.5000 like the documentation says it should
test.ToString("G29"); // outputs 20.5 which is exactly what we want
1
  • 25
    This will lead to 0.00001 displayed as 1E-05 though
    – sehe
    Commented Mar 3, 2012 at 14:02
20

This string format should make your day: "0.#############################". Keep in mind that decimals can have at most 29 significant digits though.

Examples:

? (1000000.00000000000050000000000m).ToString("0.#############################")
-> 1000000.0000000000005

? (1000000.00000000000050000000001m).ToString("0.#############################")
-> 1000000.0000000000005

? (1000000.0000000000005000000001m).ToString("0.#############################")
-> 1000000.0000000000005000000001

? (9223372036854775807.0000000001m).ToString("0.#############################")
-> 9223372036854775807

? (9223372036854775807.000000001m).ToString("0.#############################")
-> 9223372036854775807.000000001
1
  • 4
    This is the most general answer to the problem. Not sure why this isn't the default "G" format for decimal. The trailing zeros add no information. Microsoft documentation has a weird caveat for decimal: learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/base-types/… However, if the number is a Decimal and the precision specifier is omitted, fixed-point notation is always used and trailing zeros are preserved. Commented Oct 2, 2017 at 23:20
11

This is yet another variation of what I saw above. In my case I need to preserve all significant digits to the right of the decimal point, meaning drop all zeros after the most significant digit. Just thought it would be nice to share. I cannot vouch for the efficiency of this though, but when try to achieve aesthetics, you are already pretty much damned to inefficiencies.

public static string ToTrimmedString(this decimal target)
{
    string strValue = target.ToString(); //Get the stock string

    //If there is a decimal point present
    if (strValue.Contains("."))
    {
        //Remove all trailing zeros
        strValue = strValue.TrimEnd('0');

        //If all we are left with is a decimal point
        if (strValue.EndsWith(".")) //then remove it
            strValue = strValue.TrimEnd('.');
    }

    return strValue;
}

That's all, just wanted to throw in my two cents.

0
6

Another solution, based on dyslexicanaboko's answer, but independent of the current culture:

public static string ToTrimmedString(this decimal num)
{
    string str = num.ToString();
    string decimalSeparator = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator;
    if (str.Contains(decimalSeparator))
    {
        str = str.TrimEnd('0');
        if(str.EndsWith(decimalSeparator))
        {
            str = str.RemoveFromEnd(1);
        }
    }
    return str;
}

public static string RemoveFromEnd(this string str, int characterCount)
{
    return str.Remove(str.Length - characterCount, characterCount);
}
1
  • Great. Except for SqlDecimal it is CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator despite regional settings. Commented Oct 18, 2019 at 9:06
3

You can use the G0 format string if you are happy to accept scientific notation as per the documentation:

Fixed-point notation is used if the exponent that would result from expressing the number in scientific notation is greater than -5 and less than the precision specifier; otherwise, scientific notation is used.

You can use this format string as a parameter to the .ToString() method, or by specifying it as a within an interpolated string. Both are shown below.

decimal hasTrailingZeros = 20.12500m;
Console.WriteLine(hasTrailingZeros.ToString("G0")); // outputs 20.125
Console.WriteLine($"{hasTrailingZeros:G0}"); // outputs 20.125

decimal fourDecimalPlaces = 0.0001m;
Console.WriteLine(fourDecimalPlaces.ToString("G0")); // outputs 0.0001
Console.WriteLine($"{fourDecimalPlaces:G0}"); // outputs 0.0001

decimal fiveDecimalPlaces = 0.00001m;
Console.WriteLine(fiveDecimalPlaces.ToString("G0")); // outputs 1E-05
Console.WriteLine($"{fiveDecimalPlaces:G0}"); // outputs 1E-05
2

Extension method:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static string TrimDouble(this string temp)
    {
        var value = temp.IndexOf('.') == -1 ? temp : temp.TrimEnd('.', '0');
        return value == string.Empty ? "0" : value;
    }
}

Example code:

double[] dvalues = {20, 20.00, 20.5, 20.5000, 20.125, 20.125000, 0.000};
foreach (var value in dvalues)
    Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} --> {1}", value, value.ToString().TrimDouble()));

Console.WriteLine("==================");

string[] svalues = {"20", "20.00", "20.5", "20.5000", "20.125", "20.125000", "0.000"};
foreach (var value in svalues)
    Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} --> {1}", value, value.TrimDouble()));

Output:

20 --> 20
20 --> 20
20,5 --> 20,5
20,5 --> 20,5
20,125 --> 20,125
20,125 --> 20,125
0 --> 0
==================
20 --> 20
20.00 --> 2
20.5 --> 20.5
20.5000 --> 20.5
20.125 --> 20.125
20.125000 --> 20.125
0.000 --> 0
2
  • 1
    "20.00 --> 2" I think it is not good behaviour. To fix it call TrimEnd two times: TrimEnd('0'); TrimEnd(',');
    – Vadym
    Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 7:57
  • 4
    DO NOT USE the code written above. @VadymK is correct that its behavior is flawed. It will trim trailing zeros that are BEFORE the period if there is no period.
    – Sevin7
    Commented Jun 24, 2016 at 13:36
2

I don't think it's possible out-of-the-box but a simple method like this should do it

public static string TrimDecimal(decimal value)
{
    string result = value.ToString(System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    if (result.IndexOf('.') == -1)
        return result;

    return result.TrimEnd('0', '.');
}
0
2

It's quite easy to do out of the box:

Decimal YourValue; //just as example   
String YourString = YourValue.ToString().TrimEnd('0','.');

that will remove all trailing zeros from your Decimal.

The only thing that you need to do is add .ToString().TrimEnd('0','.'); to a decimal variable to convert a Decimal into a String without trailing zeros, like in the example above.

In some regions it should be a .ToString().TrimEnd('0',','); (where they use a comma instead of a point, but you can also add a dot and a comma as parameters to be sure).

(you can also add both as parameters)

4
  • gr8. Now you only have "0.0" left. Would procuce an empty string with your code.
    – jgauffin
    Commented Jun 24, 2010 at 6:07
  • 3
    Then I would suggest calling .ToString().TrimEnd('0').TrimEnd('.'). Also instead of '.' its better to have CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator so that it works across cultures. Commented Nov 7, 2011 at 8:05
  • @Mervin, please change your answer to reflect ΕГИІИО's comment. Your code would format 50.0m as 5, which is obviously an error. Commented Oct 17, 2014 at 19:30
  • Downvoting. This will turn 20 into 2 :/
    – nawfal
    Commented Nov 17, 2018 at 7:01
1
decimal val = 0.000000000100m;
string result = val == 0 ? "0" : val.ToString().TrimEnd('0').TrimEnd('.');
0
1

You can create extension method

public static class ExtensionMethod {
  public static decimal simplify_decimal(this decimal value) => decimal.Parse($"{this:0.############}");
}
0

I ended up with the following code:

    public static string DropTrailingZeros(string test)
    {
        if (test.Contains(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator))
        {
            test = test.TrimEnd('0');
        }

        if (test.EndsWith(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator))
        {
            test = test.Substring(0,
                test.Length - CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator.Length);
        }

        return test;
    }
0

I have end up with this variant:

public static string Decimal2StringCompact(decimal value, int maxDigits)
    {
        if (maxDigits < 0) maxDigits = 0;
        else if (maxDigits > 28) maxDigits = 28;
        return Math.Round(value, maxDigits, MidpointRounding.ToEven).ToString("0.############################", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    }

Advantages:

you can specify the max number of significant digits after the point to display at runtime;

you can explicitly specify a round method;

you can explicitly control a culture.

0

Given the fact that the OP stated examples with at most 5 digits, would this work for all input?

var result = (decimal)((double) input).ToString(); //with input e.g. 20.12500M

I know that the precision of double and decimal is not the same and this can lead to rounding when performing calculations, but maybe for this given question it is watertight.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.