9

Does Java shadow type parameters? I am finding it hard to test for myself because Java generics do not get reified at run time.

For example, given this code:

public class NestedGeneric<T> {
    private InnerGeneric<T> innerGenericInstance;

    private static class InnerGeneric<T> {
        public T innerGenericField;
    }

    NestedGeneric() {
    innerGenericInstance = new InnerGeneric<T>();
    }
}

Both the below statements compile fine:

NestedGeneric<Integer> test1 = new NestedGeneric<Integer>();
NestedGeneric.InnerGeneric<String> test2  = new NestedGeneric.InnerGeneric<String>();

When the NestedGeneric is passed a type parameter and its constructor called, what is T? Is it always going to be the same as the type parameter passed to nestedGeneric?

In other words, can an outer classes type parameters be passed to an inner classes generic type declarations?

2
  • 1
    Yes it can, but not mandatory. You could also make the inner class another object, but you want to change the T to a U in the nested class creation. Jun 25, 2015 at 14:00
  • Type parameters seem to be shadowed ideone.com/8DihKQ
    – ReyCharles
    Jun 25, 2015 at 14:09

3 Answers 3

6

In other words, I suppose the question is, can an outer classes type parameters be passed to an inner classes generic type declarations?

No. There is no relationship (like inheritance or as a field) between the outer and the inner static class. You can create an object of the inner static class without any dependency on the outer class like in your example:

NestedGeneric.InnerGeneric<String> test2  = new NestedGeneric.InnerGeneric<String>();

However when you use an instance of the inner class as a field the generic type is derived from the outer class:

private InnerGeneric<T> innerGenericInstance;

innerGenericInstance = new InnerGeneric<T>();

A third variation would be to define the inner class as a field (non-static):

private class InnerGeneric<T> {
    public T innerGenericField;
}

which will now get the type from the outer class since its a member variable.

As pointed out in the comment defining both inner static & outer class with the type will just confuse the reader (and yourself at a later point in time). It should be declared with a different generic like

public class NestedGeneric<T> {
    private InnerGeneric<T> innerGenericInstance;

    private static class InnerGeneric<U> {
        private U innerGenericField;
    }

    NestedGeneric() {
        innerGenericInstance = new InnerGeneric<T>();
    }
}
0
5

This is not a shadowing. There is only one type parameter int your code, the T parameter. So inner and outer T are the same type parameters.

You can of course have more type parameters.

public class NestedGeneric<OUTER_TYPE> {

  private static class InnerGeneric<INNER_TYPE> {
    public INNER_TYPE innerGenericField;
  }

  public NestedGeneric() {
    InnerGeneric<OUTER_TYPE> innerGenericInstance = new InnerGeneric<OUTER_TYPE>();

   InnerGeneric<String> secondInnerGenerics = new InnerGeneric<String>();
  } 
}

The INNER_TYPE and the OUTER_TYPE are two different type parameters. Line InnerGeneric<OUTER_TYPE> innerGenericInstance = new InnerGeneric<OUTER_TYPE>(); will say thad innerGenericInstance is parametrized by the same type as OUTER_TYPE is. But they do not have to be the same. As it is in the case of secondInnerGenerics variable.

2
  • So it's only the point of declaration that matters? Even if they COULD be named differently, I want to understand the behaviour when they are named the same. If the inner classes type parameters carry the same name as the outer class, are they still completely independent?
    – user4699992
    Jun 25, 2015 at 14:26
  • In the OP's code, there are actually two type parameters: one for NestedGeneric and one for InnerGeneric. The fact that they are both called 'T' is confusing. The class definition @plastique gives uses different names for the type parameters, which makes it more obvious that they're different parameters but the definition is functionally identical. Jun 12, 2018 at 12:41
4

Yes, but not with the static modifier:

public class NestedGeneric<T> {
    private InnerGeneric<T> innerGenericInstance;

    private class InnerGeneric<T> {
        private T innerGenericField;

        public InnerGeneric(T innerGenericField){
           this.innerGenericField = innerGenericField;
        }

        public T getInnerGenericField(){
           return this.innerGenericField;
        }
    }

    NestedGeneric(T someGenericVariable) {
        innerGenericInstance = new InnerGeneric<T>(someGenericVariable);
        T innerGenericField = innerGenericInstance.innerGenericInstance();
    }
}
2
  • In this case the inner generic class is not static which is treated differently
    – 6ton
    Jun 25, 2015 at 14:12
  • The inner class is static, but the instance of the inner class is stored in a non-static member variable.
    – user439793
    Jun 25, 2015 at 16:55

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