5

I'm registering the "$routeChangeSuccessEvent" from Angularjs by setting the callback function. When the event is raised I can not access my controllers instance by "this". The current this instance is unedfined.

My complete TypeScript Code:

export class Ctlr {

    static $inject = ["$rootScope","$route"];

    constructor(private $scope: ng.IRootScopeService) {
        this.Scope = $scope;
        this.Title = "";
        //this.Scope.$on("$routeChangeSuccessEvent", this.onRouteChangeStart);
        this.RegisterEvents();
        }
    private RegisterEvents(): void {
        this.Scope.$on("$routeChangeSuccessEvent",(event: ng.IAngularEvent, args: any) => {
        //this is undefined
            console.log(this);
        });
    }
    public Scope: ng.IScope;
    public Title: string;

    public onRouteChangeStart(event: ng.IAngularEvent, args: any) {
        //this is undefined
        this.Title = args.$$route.name);
    }

}

}

I'm able to get access of the Title property with:

 private RegisterEvents(): void {
        var ref = this.Title;
        this.Scope.$on("$routeChangeSuccessEvent",(event: ng.IAngularEvent, args: any) => {
            ref = args.$$route.name;
        });
    }

But that's not a real solution because angularJS doesn't update its view. It seems that I didn't catch the right reference. If thats not possible the whole angularjs events seems to be not useabel - that can't be possible?

I also didn't find any topic about this strange behavior. Is there a solution for this issue?

1
  • 1
    Just a quick tip: constructor(private $scope: ...) means the $scope is placed in the object properties, so the this.Scope = $scope; is redundant. Just use this.$scope. Commented Jun 25, 2015 at 15:28

4 Answers 4

3

The scope changes when a callback is fired, that is why this becomes undefined.

Your other example of doing:

var ref = this.Title;

Actually just creates a -copy- of Title as it is a primitive type (string). Which is why it didn't work either. Updating ref does not update this.Title.

The usual solution to this, is to start the definition as:

var vm = this;

...
private RegisterEvents(): void {
    this.Scope.$on("$routeChangeSuccessEvent",(event: ng.IAngularEvent, args: any) => {
    //this is undefined
        console.log(vm);
    });
}

So rather than using this everywhere, you would use vm. Note that vm can be named whatever you want. The important part is you capture a reference to this in a scope where this is what you want to use in a callback. This works because this is not a primitive type, as it is an object and rather than taking a copy, it takes a reference.

Your other option is to use bind which you can apply to any function, this function essentially tells JavaScript what this will equate to. E.g.

$scope.$on("SomeEventHere", someCallbackFunction.bind(this));

It's a matter of preference which you use here but generally I see people using the var something = this; method.

1
  • 1
    I'm using TypeScript v1.7 and I don't get undefined in this for the first code snippet :( Commented Jan 18, 2016 at 17:23
1

That's because this always refers to it's parent which is now the function. So if you wanted you could do this:

private RegisterEvents(): void {
    var ref = this;
    this.Scope.$on("$routeChangeSuccessEvent",(event: ng.IAngularEvent, args: any) => {
        console.log(ref);
    });
}
0

you can rebind the this variable: this.Scope.$on("$routeChangeSuccessEvent",this.onRouteChangeStart.bind(this));

0

As noted in other solutions, and using at least TypeScript v1.7, you can use this using a fat arrow like:

$scope.$on('some-event', () => { console.log('here `this` is not undefined'); });
$scope.$watch('foo.bar', (a,b) => { console.log('here too...'); }
$scope.$on('$routeChangeSuccessEvent', () => { console.log('here too...'); });

But, if you want to pass a reference to a function from the same class you have to use the .bind(this) notation:

$cope.$on('$routeChangeSuccessEvent', this.onRouteChangeStart.bind(this));

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