43

I have a simple systemd service that needs to be periodically restarted to keep its process from bugging out. Is there a configuration option for systemd services to periodically restart them? All of the Restart* options seem to pertain to restarting the service when it exits.

34

Yes, you can make your service to restart it periodically by making your service of Type=notify. Add this option in [Service] section of your service file along with Restart=always and give WatchdogSec=xx, where xx is the time period in second you want to restart your service. Here your process will be killed by systemd after xx time period and will be restarted by systemd again. for eg.

[Unit]
.
.

[Service]
Type=notify
.
.
WatchdogSec=10
Restart=always
.
.

[Install]
WantedBy= ....
  • 4
    Clever! FWIW type=notify is not necessary for my dumb legacy service that just bugs out after a while. Setting WatchdogSec with Type=simple works the same, though. – wes Jun 26 '15 at 14:04
  • 14
    The problem with WatchdogSec is that it will send a SIGABRT (causing a core dump) every time it restarts. Besides uncleanly terminating the process, it also could fill up your root disk with coredumps eventually. – bk0 Jan 3 '17 at 22:54
  • 1
    @wes thanks, Type=notify was not making the service start for me, Type=simple` works great ( actually without any Type works fine too, probably simple is the default Type ) – WonderLand Mar 7 '17 at 5:31
  • Don't use Type=notify unless the service is already systemd-aware. Such a service's unit would already be using Type=notify. Using this with a service that does not speak to systemd will cause failures to start. – Michael Hampton Aug 15 '18 at 16:02
  • As of ver240, there is WatchdogSignal so you can override the SIGABRT github.com/systemd/systemd/blob/master/NEWS – Gary Myers Nov 27 at 21:31
65

This may not have been present at the time the question was asked, but there is now an option called RuntimeMaxSec, which terminates the service after it has been running for the given period of time.

e.g.

[Service]
Restart=always
RuntimeMaxSec=604800

To me this seems more elegant than abusing Type=notify and WatchdogSec.

  • 8
    this is only available in systemd v >= 229. Run systemctl --version to see your version – Hilikus Oct 1 '18 at 17:59
32

I saw a solution here that seemed elegant, if a bit roundabout. The key idea is to create a one-shot service triggered by a timer that restarts another service.

For the timer:

[Unit]
Description=Do something daily

[Timer]
OnCalendar=daily
Persistent=true

[Install]
WantedBy=timers.target

For the one-shot service:

[Unit]
Description=Restart service

[Service]
Type=oneshot
ExecStart=/usr/bin/systemctl try-restart my_program.service

For the one-shot service on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS:

[Unit]
Description=Restart service

[Service]
Type=oneshot
ExecStart=/bin/systemctl try-restart my_program.service

This solution lets you leverage systemd's timers, including the ability to restart the service at a particular time of day, and not just after some amount of time has elapsed.

  • 3
    I'm confused about how the daily timer calls the one-shot service here? – svandragt Apr 5 '17 at 10:47
  • 2
    I'm not sure if this is what you're asking, but, as best as I understand it, the one-shot service has a timer associated with it, and the job of this one-shot service is to restart another service. I believe this is accomplished by simply naming the service and its associated timer with the same name, i.e., weeklyRestart.service and weeklyRestart.timer. When I worked this out, I went through a lot of links. Message me and I can send you a link dump. – matmat Apr 6 '17 at 17:52
  • 3
    @svandragt That's exactly how it works. A systemd timer has to have the same name as the service it's starting. – Michael Ambrose Jun 20 '17 at 21:48
  • 1
    @MichaelAmbrose Not necessarily, you can also specify another service with Unit=. – Chris Down Dec 10 '17 at 15:59
  • advantage of this solution: with an "ExecStartPre" you can do some checks to higher the chance that the service starts, e.g. syntax check the config. – Marco Jun 17 '18 at 6:14
14

How about a crontab like

30 3 * * sun /bin/systemctl restart yourService

which would restart the service yourService at 3:30am each Sunday.

  • 1
    I can't believe I didn't think of this! This is by far the easiest solution. – jlh Dec 18 '18 at 6:43
  • @jlh how is this any better than accepted answer ? – Ciasto piekarz Jan 8 at 12:23
  • @Ciastopiekarz See the comments to the accepted answer to see why that's a problematic solution. Additionally, doing it with cron allows to restart at a specific time of day. The other solution are period-based, which might drift around with time. – jlh Jan 9 at 15:24
  • I see, so thats systemd version independent solution ! – Ciasto piekarz Jan 9 at 18:21
3

Just some alternate approaches to ultimately reach the same goal:

  • if you have control over the service implementation you could make it end voluntarily after a while, for example either plain exiting after a certain number of iterations (if applicable) or using a timeout timer with a handler sendin itself a SIGTERM/SIGKILL
  • if voluntary service ending is not feasible/practical you could have a small cron-based script killing the service process(es).
2

Wanted to comment on the

[Service]
Restart=always
RuntimeMaxSec=604800

answer above but can't w/o more points.

Comment is that this solution will invoke failure handling set by OnFailure=failure_handling.service. Since the scheduled restart isn't a real failure any logging, notifications, etc. from the failure handling service will be unwanted and probably disruptive.

An actual periodic restart would be a sensible feature for systemd, but I won't hold my breath.

  • According to the doc: A service unit using Restart= enters the failed state only after the start limits are reached. – Robin Daugherty Nov 27 at 19:39

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