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I have a simple GUI and I just want to have some text fields stacked on top of each other, with each box being a JPanel. I'm currently using FlowLayout for both the JFrame and JPanel but it changes from being stacked to being in a row when I maximize. Ideally I'd like the text fields to stay in the center of the window even if its maximized. I was looking at using a BoxLayout but was having some trouble getting that to work.

public static Component textbox(String x){
        JPanel panel = new JPanel(new FlowLayout(5,5,5));
        JLabel lbltAm= new JLabel(x);
        JTextField tftAm = new JTextField(10);
        lbltAm.setFont(new Font("Serif", Font.PLAIN, 14));
        lbltAm.setForeground(Color.white);
        panel.add(lbltAm, BorderLayout.NORTH);
        panel.add(tftAm, BorderLayout.CENTER);
        panel.setBackground(Color.DARK_GRAY);

        Border lowerbevel = BorderFactory.createBevelBorder(BevelBorder.LOWERED);
        panel.setBorder(lowerbevel);

        return panel;
}

private static void createAndShowGUI() {

    //Create and set up the window.


    JFrame frame = new JFrame("Tip Calculator");
    //Add Textbox
    frame.setLayout(new BoxLayout(frame, BoxLayout.Y_AXIS));
    String Label = "Tip Calculator";
    JLabel header = new JLabel(Label);
    header.setFont(new Font("Serif", Font.BOLD, 18));
    frame.add(header);

    frame.add(textbox("Total"));
    frame.add(textbox("Tip %"));
    frame.add(textbox("People"));

    frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    frame.getContentPane().setBackground(Color.gray);
    frame.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(300, 400));
    frame.pack();
    frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
    frame.setVisible(true);
}
2

It's a matter of opinion, but for flexibility, I prefer to use GridBagLayout

enter image description here

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Component;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.Font;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Graphics2D;
import java.awt.GridBagConstraints;
import java.awt.GridBagLayout;
import java.awt.Insets;
import javax.swing.BorderFactory;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.JTextField;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;
import javax.swing.border.BevelBorder;
import javax.swing.border.Border;

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Test();
    }

    public Test() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException | InstantiationException | IllegalAccessException | UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                    ex.printStackTrace();
                }

                JFrame frame = new JFrame("Testing");
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.add(new TestPane());
                frame.pack();
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }

    public class TestPane extends JPanel {

        public TestPane() {
            setLayout(new GridBagLayout());
            GridBagConstraints gbc = new GridBagConstraints();
            gbc.gridwidth = GridBagConstraints.REMAINDER;
            add(textbox("Total"), gbc);
            add(textbox("Tip %"), gbc);
            add(textbox("People"), gbc);
        }

        public Component textbox(String x) {
            JPanel panel = new JPanel(new GridBagLayout());
            GridBagConstraints gbc = new GridBagConstraints();
            gbc.gridwidth = GridBagConstraints.REMAINDER;
            gbc.insets = new Insets(5, 5, 5, 5);

            JLabel lbltAm = new JLabel(x);
            JTextField tftAm = new JTextField(10);
            lbltAm.setFont(new Font("Serif", Font.PLAIN, 14));
            lbltAm.setForeground(Color.white);

            panel.add(lbltAm, gbc);
            panel.add(tftAm, gbc);
            panel.setBackground(Color.DARK_GRAY);

            Border lowerbevel = BorderFactory.createBevelBorder(BevelBorder.LOWERED);
            panel.setBorder(lowerbevel);

            return panel;
        }
    }

}

Or if your wanted the "boxes" to occupy the whole area when expanded, you could use something like...

    GridBagConstraints gbc = new GridBagConstraints();
    gbc.gridwidth = GridBagConstraints.REMAINDER;
    gbc.weightx = 1;
    gbc.weighty = 1;
    gbc.fill = GridBagConstraints.BOTH;
    add(textbox("Total"), gbc);
    add(textbox("Tip %"), gbc);
    add(textbox("People"), gbc);

Which results in something like...

enter image description here

Have a look at Laying Out Components Within a Container and How to Use GridBagLayout for more details

  • Ok the first example is more like what I was looking for. Thanks for the examples, I'm still very new to GUI stuff so still trying to get a handle on different layouts. – user3769402 Jun 26 '15 at 0:08
  • Layouts are fun :) – MadProgrammer Jun 26 '15 at 0:09
2

Firstly, I don't know why you're adding components to the JPanel with a method that is for BorderLayout after you've set the layout of panel as FlowLayout.

If you want to keep the components centered at all times (even if the screen is maximized), FlowLayout is probably not the best option for you to work with, as FlowLayout continues to position components horizontally until they fill the width of the frame (one row) and then, it begins the next row. Therefore, if the screen size is maximized, there will be more components per row and they won't be stacked. I would suggest using a GridLayout with one column like so:

frame.setLayout(new GridLayout(3 *(number of rows/components)*, 1));

You can do the same with the JPanel. After that, set the horizontal alignment of each component as centered like so:

component.setHorizontalAlignment(componentName.CENTER);

Hope this helps!

1

Try to use GridLayout instead of BoxLayout in createAndShowGUI.

frame.setLayout(new GridLayout(4,1));

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