2

I'm studying "Expression Tree" but I'm not managing to perform these expressions:

// first case
someList.Select(p => p.SomeProperty);

and

// second case
someList.Select(p => new OtherClass 
{
    SomeProperty = p.SomeProperty
})

To the "first case" I tried do this:

var someList = new List<SomeClass>();
someList.Add(new SomeClass { SomeProperty = "Hello" });

var someParam = Expression.Parameter(typeof(SomeClass), "p");
var someProperty = Expression.Property(someParam, "SomeProperty");

Expression.Call(
    typeof(Enumerable),
    "Select",
    new Type[]
    {
        typeof(SomeClass),
        typeof(string)
    },
    Expression.Lambda(
        someProperty,
        someParam
    )
).Dump();

But I get this error:

InvalidOperationException: No generic method 'Select' on type 'System.Linq.Enumerable' is compatible with the supplied type arguments and arguments. No type arguments should be provided if the method is non-generic.

About the "second case", I don't have ideia how to proceed.

Can anyone guide me here?

  • I think you are missing supplying the IEnumerable<SomeClass> parameter that would be between new Type[] and Expression.Lambda in your Expression.Call – Will Jun 26 '15 at 4:06
  • You can't use directly expression trees with Enumerable.* methods. You have to .Compile() them, or use a IQueryable<> and Queryable.* methods. – xanatos Jun 26 '15 at 6:27
1

Calm down folks, after some research I found what was missing in my code...

On the fist case:

Expression.Call(
    typeof(Enumerable),
    "Select",
    new Type[]
    {
        typeof(SomeClass),
        typeof(string)
    },
    Expression.Constant(someList), // <---------------- HERE IT IS
    Expression.Lambda(
        someProperty,
        someParam
    )
);

To the second case, I created the "new" expression through the code below:

var bind = Expression.Bind(typeof(OtherClass).GetProperty("SomeProperty"), someProperty);
var otherClassNew = Expression.New(typeof(OtherClass));
var otherClassInit = Expression.MemberInit(otherClassNew, bind);

Anyway, Thank you all for your help!

0

Some examples of what you could do:

Given

public class SomeClass
{
    public string SomeProperty { get; set; }
}

and

var someList = new List<SomeClass>();
someList.Add(new SomeClass { SomeProperty = "Hello" });

var someParam = Expression.Parameter(typeof(SomeClass), "p");
var someProperty = Expression.Property(someParam, "SomeProperty");

Expression<Func<SomeClass, string>> lambda = Expression.Lambda<Func<SomeClass, string>>(someProperty, someParam); // p => p.SomeProperty

Using an IEnumerable<SomeClass>... Note the .Compile()

Func<SomeClass, string> compiled = lambda.Compile();
IEnumerable<string> q1 = someList.Select(compiled);

You shouldn't ever use AsQueryable() but in unit tests and "experimentation" programs (like this one). Just to make @Peter happy, I'll add another possible condition: if you really know what it does (not think you know what it does, really!), then you can use it. But if it the first time you use it, I still suggest you ask on SO if you are right in using it.

IQueryable<SomeClass> queryable = someList.AsQueryable();

Directly using the Queryable.Select()

IQueryable<string> q2 = queryable.Select(lambda);

Building a Select and using the CreateQuery (this is very similar to what internally the Queryable.Select does) to "inject" it in the query.

MethodInfo select = (from x in typeof(Queryable).GetMethods()
                    where x.Name == "Select" && x.IsGenericMethod
                    let gens = x.GetGenericArguments()
                    where gens.Length == 2
                    let pars = x.GetParameters()
                    where pars.Length == 2 && 
                        pars[0].ParameterType == typeof(IQueryable<>).MakeGenericType(gens[0]) &&
                        pars[1].ParameterType == typeof(Expression<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(Func<,>).MakeGenericType(gens))
                    select x).Single().MakeGenericMethod(typeof(SomeClass), typeof(string));

MethodCallExpression select2 = Expression.Call(null, select, Expression.Constant(queryable), lambda);

IQueryProvider provider = queryable.Provider;
IQueryable<string> q3 = provider.CreateQuery<string>(select2);
  • Why should we "never use AsQueryable() but in unit tests and experimentation programs" ? Given such a strong statement it would be good if you backed it up with a short explanation – Peter Lillevold Jun 26 '15 at 7:25
  • @PeterLillevold Because it doesn't do what 90% of C# programmers think it does. If someone uses it outside of a unit test, 9 times out of 10 he doesn't know what he is doing and is simply throwing things until it compiles. – xanatos Jun 26 '15 at 7:27
  • @PeterLillevold The right sentence should be "you shouldn't use it unless you know what you are doing", but few will admit that they are throwing things until it compiles, so it is easier to use absolutes... Like "don't use float and double unless you are a game programmer or are creating a PDF". – xanatos Jun 26 '15 at 7:29
  • ok, so therefore I think that your statement is highly opinionated and does not highlight anything that is relevant to the OP question. Using absolutes will not increase awareness and understanding unless you back it up with good reasoning. – Peter Lillevold Jun 26 '15 at 7:38
  • @PeterLillevold The question wasn't about AsQueryable(), and I wanted to make it clear that I don't endorse its use anywhere but in some place. Now... There are probably use cases where you can use AsQueryable(), but you must be "this much tall" to be able to recognize them. – xanatos Jun 26 '15 at 7:42

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