74

Using ES6 promises, how do I create a promise without defining the logic for resolving it? Here's a basic example (some TypeScript):

var promises = {};
function waitFor(key: string): Promise<any> {
  if (key in promises) {
    return promises[key];
  }
  var promise = new Promise(resolve => {
    // But I don't want to try resolving anything here :(
  });

  promises[key] = promise;
  return promise;
}

function resolveWith(key: string, value: any): void {
  promises[key].resolve(value); // Not valid :(
}

It's easily done with other promise libraries. JQuery's for example:

var deferreds = {};
function waitFor(key: string): Promise<any> {
  if (key in promises) {
    return deferreds[key].promise();
  }
  var def = $.Deferred();    
  deferreds[key] = def;
  return def.promise();
}

function resolveWith(key: string, value: any): void {
  deferreds[key].resolve(value);
}

The only way I can see to do this would be to store the resolve function away somewhere within the promise's executor but that seems messy, and I'm not sure it's defined when exactly this function is run - is it always run immediately on construction?

Thanks.

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87

Good question!

The resolver passed to the promise constructor intentionally runs synchronous in order to support this use case:

var deferreds = [];
var p = new Promise(function(resolve, reject){
    deferreds.push({resolve: resolve, reject: reject});
});

Then, at some later point in time:

 deferreds[0].resolve("Hello"); // resolve the promise with "Hello"

The reason the promise constructor is given is that:

  • Typically (but not always) resolution logic is bound to the creation.
  • The promise constructor is throw safe and converts exceptions to rejections.

Sometimes it doesn't fit and for that it the resolver runs synchronously. Here is related reading on the topic.

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51

I want to add my 2 cents here. Considering exactly the question "Creating a es6 Promise without starting resolve it" I solved it creating a wrapper function and calling the wrapper function instead. Code:

Let's say we have a function f which returns a Promise

/** @return Promise<any> */
function f(args) {
   return new Promise(....)
}

// calling f()
f('hello', 42).then((response) => { ... })

Now, I want to prepare a call to f('hello', 42) without actually solving it:

const task = () => f('hello', 42) // not calling it actually

// later
task().then((response) => { ... })

Hope this will help someone :)


Referencing Promise.all() as asked in the comments (and answered by @Joe Frambach), if I want to prepare a call to f1('super') & f2('rainbow'), 2 functions that return promises

const f1 = args => new Promise( ... )
const f2 = args => new Promise( ... )

const tasks = [
  () => f1('super'),
  () => f2('rainbow')
]

// later
Promise.all(tasks.map(t => t()))
  .then(resolvedValues => { ... })
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  • How can this be used with Promise.all() ? – Frondor Mar 1 '18 at 3:51
  • tasks = [() => f(1), () => f(2)]; Promise.all(tasks.map(t => t())).then(... – Frambot Mar 28 '18 at 20:57
3

How about a more comprehensive approach?

You could write a Constructor that returns a new Promise decorated with .resolve() and .reject() methods.

You would probably choose to name the constructor Deferred - a term with a lot of precedence in [the history of] javascript promises.

function Deferred(fn) {
    fn = fn || function(){};

    var resolve_, reject_;

    var promise = new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        resolve_ = resolve;
        reject_ = reject;
        fn(resolve, reject);
    });

    promise.resolve = function(val) {
        (val === undefined) ? resolve_() : resolve_(val);
        return promise;//for chainability
    }
    promise.reject = function(reason) {
        (reason === undefined) ? reject_() : reject_(reason);
        return promise;//for chainability
    }
    promise.promise = function() {
        return promise.then(); //to derive an undecorated promise (expensive but simple).
    }

    return promise;
}

By returning a decorated promsie rather than a plain object, all the promise's natural methods/properties remain available in addition to the decorations.

Also, by handling fn, the revealer pattern remains availble, should you need/choose to use it on a Deferred.

DEMO

Now, with the Deferred() utility in place, your code is virtually identical to the jQuery example.

var deferreds = {};
function waitFor(key: string): Promise<any> {
  if (key in promises) {
    return deferreds[key].promise();
  }
  var def = Deferred();    
  deferreds[key] = def;
  return def.promise();
}
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  • I don't know, this seems to re-introduce all the things that we wanted to avoid when switching from deferreds to promises and the constructor approach. Also, your implementation is totally overcomplicated, and contains a few mistakes: a) if you give Deferred a callback parameter, it should be called back with the deferred b) testing the value/reason for undefined is absolutely unnecessary c) .resolve and .reject never need to be chained d) your .promise method doesn't return an undecorated promise – Bergi Jun 27 '15 at 10:01
  • I've always been uneasy about designing out Deferreds. I'm sure they are rare but there must be usage cases when a Deferred is necessary - ie when the means for settlement cannot be defined at the time a Promise is created. I don't understand (a), I'm open to persuasion on (b) and you're certainly right about (c). – Roamer-1888 Jun 27 '15 at 11:07
  • I mean that you should do fn(promise) (or rather, fn(deferred) actually) instead of fn(resolve, reject). Yes, I can certainly see a need for "resolver objects" that can be stored somewhere and expose .fulfill and .reject methods, but I think those should not implement the promise interface. – Bergi Jun 27 '15 at 12:07
  • @Bergi, I understand that jQuery, for example, reveals the Deferred itself as a callback arg. Maybe I'm missing something but I can't see why a Deferred implementation shouldn't mimic the de facto practice for new Promise(fn) of revealing just resolve and reject. – Roamer-1888 Jun 27 '15 at 13:39
  • Also, whereas the when.js documentation discourages use of its when.defer, it does acknowledge that in certain (rare) scenarios it can be convenient to have access to both the promise and it's associated resolving functions. If that statement is to be believed, then what I'm offering above should seem reasonable (in rare scenarios). – Roamer-1888 Jun 27 '15 at 13:42
1

Things are slowly getting better in JavaScript land, but this is one case where things are still unnecessarily complicated. Here's a simple helper to expose the resolve and reject functions:

Promise.unwrapped = () => {
  let resolve, reject, promise = new Promise((_resolve, _reject) => {
    resolve = _resolve, reject = _reject
  })
  promise.resolve = resolve, promise.reject = reject
  return promise
}

// a contrived example

let p = Promise.unwrapped()
p.then(v => alert(v))
p.resolve('test')

Apparently there used to be a Promise.defer helper, but even that insisted on the deferred object being separate from the promise itself...

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