197

How would you do this? Instinctively, I want to do:

var myMap = new Map([["thing1", 1], ["thing2", 2], ["thing3", 3]]);

// wishful, ignorant thinking
var newMap = myMap.map((key, value) => value + 1); // Map { 'thing1' => 2, 'thing2' => 3, 'thing3' => 4 }

I've haven't gleaned much from the documentation on the new iteration protocol.

I am aware of wu.js, but I'm running a Babel project and don't want to include Traceur, which it seems like it currently depends on.

I also am a bit clueless as to how to extract how fitzgen/wu.js did it into my own project.

Would love a clear, concise explanation of what I'm missing here. Thanks!


Docs for ES6 Map, FYI

6
  • Are you able to use Array.from?
    – Ry-
    Commented Jun 27, 2015 at 2:44
  • @minitech Possibly, with a polyfill... is there not a way to do this without it?
    – neezer
    Commented Jun 27, 2015 at 2:54
  • Well, you could write your own map function for use on iterables, using for of.
    – Ry-
    Commented Jun 27, 2015 at 2:57
  • Super nitpick, but if you were really going to map over a Map, you'd get back a Map at the end. Otherwise you're just first converting a Map into an Array and mapping over an Array, not .map()ing a Map. You could easily map over a Map by using an ISO: dimap(x=>[...x], x=> new Map(x));
    – Dtipson
    Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 22:42
  • @Ry well, we probably can write our own programming language, but why..? It's quite simple thing and exists in most programming languages for many decades.
    – ruX
    Commented Oct 27, 2018 at 11:24

15 Answers 15

133

So .map itself only offers one value you care about... That said, there are a few ways of tackling this:

// instantiation
const myMap = new Map([
  [ "A", 1 ],
  [ "B", 2 ]
]);

// what's built into Map for you
myMap.forEach( (val, key) => console.log(key, val) ); // "A 1", "B 2"

// what Array can do for you
Array.from( myMap ).map(([key, value]) => ({ key, value })); // [{key:"A", value: 1}, ... ]

// less awesome iteration
let entries = myMap.entries( );
for (let entry of entries) {
  console.log(entry);
}

Note, I'm using a lot of new stuff in that second example... ...Array.from takes any iterable (any time you'd use [].slice.call( ), plus Sets and Maps) and turns it into an array... ...Maps, when coerced into an array, turn into an array of arrays, where el[0] === key && el[1] === value; (basically, in the same format that I prefilled my example Map with, above).

I'm using destructuring of the array in the argument position of the lambda, to assign those array spots to values, before returning an object for each el.

If you're using Babel, in production, you're going to need to use Babel's browser polyfill (which includes "core-js" and Facebook's "regenerator").
I'm quite certain it contains Array.from.

7
  • Yeah, just noticing that it looks like I'll need Array.from in order to do this. Your first example doesn't return an array, btw.
    – neezer
    Commented Jun 27, 2015 at 3:06
  • @neezer no, it doesn't. .forEach returns undefined flat out, all the time, as the expected use of forEach is a simple side-effect based iteration (same as it has been since ES5). In order to use that forEach, you'd want to build an array and populate it by hand, either through said forEach or through the iterator returned by .entries() or .keys( ) or .values( ). Array.from isn't doing anything mind-bendingly unique, it's just hiding that particular ugliness of doing said traversal. And yes, check that by including babel-core/browser.js (or whatever it is) you get .from...
    – LetterEh
    Commented Jun 27, 2015 at 3:08
  • 7
    See my answer, Array.from takes a map function as a param, you don't need create a temporary array just to map over it and discard it. Commented Jun 27, 2015 at 3:30
  • Can you explain why the object needs a parentheses wrapped around it? I'm still a little new to ES6 and having trouble understanding that part. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… says that it gets interpreted as a label and im not sure what that means
    – dtc
    Commented Jan 20, 2017 at 18:49
  • 1
    @dtc yeah, when you write an object you write const obj = { x: 1 };, when you write a block of code, you write if (...) { /* block */ }, when you write an arrow function you write () => { return 1; }, so how does it know when it's a function body, versus the braces of an object? And the answer is parentheses. Otherwise, it expects that the name is a label for a code-block a rarely used feature, but you can label a switch or a loop, so that you can break; out of them by name. So if it's missing, you have a function body, with a label, and the statement 1, based on the MDN example
    – LetterEh
    Commented Jan 20, 2017 at 21:08
94

Just use Array.from(iterable, [mapFn]).

var myMap = new Map([["thing1", 1], ["thing2", 2], ["thing3", 3]]);

var newEntries = Array.from(myMap, ([key, value]) => [key, value + 1]);
var newMap = new Map(newEntries);
6
  • 2
    Thanks for this answer, I wish it were higher up. I use the pattern of spreading a Map into a temporary array all the time, blithely unaware Array.from() took a mapping function as an optional second parameter.
    – Andru
    Commented Nov 6, 2020 at 10:14
  • This is so nice. And it plays nice with Flow too, when using Map.values(), unlike Array.values() which still does not :facepalm:
    – ericsoco
    Commented Dec 5, 2020 at 0:10
  • I suppose this answer must be the chosen by the OP. As this is the only and correct way to do so.
    – Bender
    Commented Jun 9, 2021 at 10:12
  • 1
    When running this in typescript playground it required explicitly specifying the type of newEntries variable otherwise it inferred the incorrect type. var newEntries: Array<[string, number]> = Array.from(myMap, ([key, value]) => [key, value + 1]); Commented Mar 21, 2022 at 18:05
  • 1
    @OmarRodriguez with [email protected], this doesn't seem to be necessary any longer.
    – wegry
    Commented May 23, 2022 at 13:04
43

You should just use Spread operator:

var myMap = new Map([["thing1", 1], ["thing2", 2], ["thing3", 3]]);

var newArr = [...myMap].map(value => value[1] + 1);
console.log(newArr); //[2, 3, 4]

var newArr2 = [for(value of myMap) value = value[1] + 1];
console.log(newArr2); //[2, 3, 4]

7
  • Looks like it still requires Array.from, FYI.
    – neezer
    Commented Jun 27, 2015 at 3:13
  • 1
    @neezer you absolutely, positively must use Babel's polyfill, in order to use Babel-transpiled code on your page, in production. There's no way around it, unless you implement all of those methods (including Facebook's Regenerator) by yourself, by hand...
    – LetterEh
    Commented Jun 27, 2015 at 3:15
  • @Norguard Got it -- just a configuration change I'll need to make is all I meant. More of an aside, really. :)
    – neezer
    Commented Jun 27, 2015 at 3:21
  • 8
    Just to note, [...myMap].map(mapFn) is going to create a a temporary array and then discard it. Array.from takes a mapFn as its second argument, just use that. Commented Jun 27, 2015 at 3:34
  • 3
    @wZVanG Why not Array.from(myMap.values(), val => val + 1);? Commented Jun 27, 2015 at 3:44
8

You can use this function:

function mapMap(map, fn) {
  return new Map(Array.from(map, ([key, value]) => [key, fn(value, key, map)]))
}

example:

var map1 = new Map([['A', 2], ['B', 3], ['C', 4]])
var map2 = mapMap(map1, v => v * v)
console.log(map1, map2)

output:

Map { A → 2, B → 3, C → 4 }
Map { A → 4, B → 9, C → 16 }
5

In typescript, in case somebody would need it :

export {}

declare global {
    interface Map<K, V> {
        map<T>(predicate: (key: K, value: V) => T): Map<V, T>
    }
}

Map.prototype.map = function<K, V, T>(predicate: (value: V, key: K) => T): Map<K, T> {
    let map: Map<K, T> = new Map()

    this.forEach((value: V, key: K) => {
        map.set(key, predicate(value, key))
    })
    return map
}
2
  • This works, and is my preferred approach, but now none of the other Map functions, such as get() are available on Map. Any idea what I can do about this? I have described my problem in this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/74628273/…
    – serlingpa
    Commented Nov 30, 2022 at 13:05
  • 1
    Actually scrap that. It was my client code that was broken, thus yielding undefined for the various methods, such as .set(). Fixed now.
    – serlingpa
    Commented Nov 30, 2022 at 15:42
3

Using Array.from I wrote a Typescript function that maps the values:

function mapKeys<T, V, U>(m: Map<T, V>, fn: (this: void, v: V) => U): Map<T, U> {
  function transformPair([k, v]: [T, V]): [T, U] {
    return [k, fn(v)]
  }
  return new Map(Array.from(m.entries(), transformPair));
}

const m = new Map([[1, 2], [3, 4]]);
console.log(mapKeys(m, i => i + 1));
// Map { 1 => 3, 3 => 5 }
3

Actually you can still have a Map with the original keys after converting to array with Array.from. That's possible by returning an array, where the first item is the key, and the second is the transformed value.

const originalMap = new Map([
  ["thing1", 1], ["thing2", 2], ["thing3", 3]
]);

const arrayMap = Array.from(originalMap, ([key, value]) => {
    return [key, value + 1]; // return an array
});

const alteredMap = new Map(arrayMap);

console.log(originalMap); // Map { 'thing1' => 1, 'thing2' => 2, 'thing3' => 3 }
console.log(alteredMap);  // Map { 'thing1' => 2, 'thing2' => 3, 'thing3' => 4 }

If you don't return that key as the first array item, you loose your Map keys.

2

You can map() arrays, but there is no such operation for Maps. The solution from Dr. Axel Rauschmayer:

  • Convert the map into an array of [key,value] pairs.
  • Map or filter the array.
  • Convert the result back to a map.

Example:

let map0 = new Map([
  [1, "a"],
  [2, "b"],
  [3, "c"]
]);

const map1 = new Map(
  [...map0]
  .map(([k, v]) => [k * 2, '_' + v])
);

resulted in

{2 => '_a', 4 => '_b', 6 => '_c'}
1

I prefer to extend the map

export class UtilMap extends Map {  
  constructor(...args) { super(args); }  
  public map(supplier) {
      const mapped = new UtilMap();
      this.forEach(((value, key) => mapped.set(key, supplier(value, key)) ));
      return mapped;
  };
}
1

You can use myMap.forEach, and in each loop, using map.set to change value.

myMap = new Map([
  ["a", 1],
  ["b", 2],
  ["c", 3]
]);

for (var [key, value] of myMap.entries()) {
  console.log(key + ' = ' + value);
}


myMap.forEach((value, key, map) => {
  map.set(key, value+1)
})

for (var [key, value] of myMap.entries()) {
  console.log(key + ' = ' + value);
}

1
  • I think this misses the point. Array.map doesn't mutate anything.
    – Aaron
    Commented Jun 17, 2020 at 15:59
1

Here is a Typescript variant which builds upon some of the existing ideas and attempts to be flexible in the following ways:

  • Both key and value types of output map can differ from input
  • The mapper function can access the input map itself, if it likes
function mapMap<TKI, TVI, TKO, TVO>(map: Map<TKI, TVI>,
        f: (k: TKI, v: TVI, m: Map<TKI, TVI>) => [TKO, TVO]) : Map<TKO, TVO>{
    return new Map([...map].map(p => f(p[0], p[1], map)))
}

Note: this code uses the spread operator, like some of the existing ideas, and so needs a target of of 'es2015' or higher according to my VS Code Intellisense.

0

const mapMap = (callback, map) => new Map(Array.from(map).map(callback))

var myMap = new Map([["thing1", 1], ["thing2", 2], ["thing3", 3]]);

var newMap = mapMap((pair) => [pair[0], pair[1] + 1], myMap); // Map { 'thing1' => 2, 'thing2' => 3, 'thing3' => 4 }

0

If you don't want to convert the entire Map into an array beforehand, and/or destructure key-value arrays, you can use this silly function:

/**
 * Map over an ES6 Map.
 *
 * @param {Map} map
 * @param {Function} cb Callback. Receives two arguments: key, value.
 * @returns {Array}
 */
function mapMap(map, cb) {
  let out = new Array(map.size);
  let i = 0;
  map.forEach((val, key) => {
    out[i++] = cb(key, val);
  });
  return out;
}

let map = new Map([
  ["a", 1],
  ["b", 2],
  ["c", 3]
]);

console.log(
  mapMap(map, (k, v) => `${k}-${v}`).join(', ')
); // a-1, b-2, c-3

0
Map.prototype.map = function(callback) {
  const output = new Map()
  this.forEach((element, key)=>{
    output.set(key, callback(element, key))
  })
  return output
}

const myMap = new Map([["thing1", 1], ["thing2", 2], ["thing3", 3]])
// no longer wishful thinking
const newMap = myMap.map((value, key) => value + 1)
console.info(myMap, newMap)

Depends on your religious fervor in avoiding editing prototypes, but, I find this lets me keep it intuitive.

-1

Maybe this way:

const m = new Map([["a", 1], ["b", 2], ["c", 3]]);
m.map((k, v) => [k, v * 2]); // Map { 'a' => 2, 'b' => 4, 'c' => 6 }

You would only need to monkey patch Map before:

Map.prototype.map = function(func){
    return new Map(Array.from(this, ([k, v]) => func(k, v)));
}

We could have wrote a simpler form of this patch:

Map.prototype.map = function(func){
    return new Map(Array.from(this, func));
}

But we would have forced us to then write m.map(([k, v]) => [k, v * 2]); which seems a bit more painful and ugly to me.

Mapping values only

We could also map values only, but I wouldn't advice going for that solution as it is too specific. Nevertheless it can be done and we would have the following API:

const m = new Map([["a", 1], ["b", 2], ["c", 3]]);
m.map(v => v * 2); // Map { 'a' => 2, 'b' => 4, 'c' => 6 }

Just like before patching this way:

Map.prototype.map = function(func){
    return new Map(Array.from(this, ([k, v]) => [k, func(v)]));
}

Maybe you can have both, naming the second mapValues to make it clear that you are not actually mapping the object as it would probably be expected.

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