5

I have a DbContext that houses +80 entities at the moment with only 4 of the main modules done, but there are 3 more to go, and they are quite bigger so it will get up to 150 easy. I think it is the perfect time to divide the contexts. Every module uses it's own entities and will get it's own context, but there is a group of entities that are used by all of the modules, so here is mu question:

Should I have one MainContext that will have all of the overlapping entities but then:

  • What will happen to the FK dependencies?
  • How much of a performance issue would be to have nested using (var db = new context) because I will need to access the main context from every module.

Should I put the overlapping entities in all of the contexts, but then

  • What happens with the mapping, wouldn't every context try to map it's own entity and get an error?
  • Should I exclude the mapping of the overlapping contexts on all but one of the contexts?

Should I stay with one context?

Any other suggestions?

  • Unfortunately, each entity and all of its dependencies (i.e. its association) can be tracked by at most one context. – Hans Jun 27 '15 at 9:25
  • So then the first option is my only solution, but what about the nested using's? – GregoryHouseMD Jun 27 '15 at 10:18
6

You will have problems if you need to use a transaction that spans more than one DbContext. It will be promoted to a distributed transaction no matter if all of the DbContexts connect to the same database. This makes things very slow.

You will also lose the benefit of the unit of work because the DbContexts will track their models independently.

You could still separate the models and duplicate the shared ones. This will not cause the various DbContexts to break relationships or deadlock any more than two people running two copies of your software at the same time would.

However, to keep things manageable you can stay in one DbContext, but hide the models that are not needed in each module.

Take the following DbContext -

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Person> People { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Vehicle> Cars { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Trip> Trips { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Company> Employers { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Employee> { get; set; }
}

If you wanted to make a driving module, you might only use People, Cars, & Trips. If you wanted a payroll module, you might only use Company, Employee, & People. So you would need the following interfaces:

public interface IDrivingContext
{
    DbSet<Person> People { get; }
    DbSet<Vehicle> Cars { get; }
    DbSet<Trip> Trips { get; }
}

public interface IPayrollContext
{
    DbSet<Person> People { get; }
    DbSet<Company> Employers { get; }
    DbSet<Employee> Employees { get; }
}

Then you change your context to implement both interfaces:

public class MyContext : DbContext, IDrivingContext, IPayrollContext
{
    public DbSet<Person> People { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Vehicle> Cars { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Trip> Trips { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Company> Employers { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Employee> { get; set; }
}

And when you use the DbContext, only type the variable as IDrivingContext or IPayrollContext, depending on which module you are coding inside of:

using (IDrivingContext db = new MyDbContext())
{
     // ...
}

using (IPayrollContext db = new MyDbContext())
{
    // ...
}
  • This looks very very promising, I'll give it a go and get back to you in a few hours :) – GregoryHouseMD Jun 27 '15 at 17:57
  • I had to implement IDisposable so I could use them inside a using statement, but db.SaveChanges() doesnt work. Should I implement something else? – GregoryHouseMD Jun 27 '15 at 19:31
  • DTS won't be activated if different contexts use exactly the same connection string. – Gert Arnold Jun 27 '15 at 21:33
  • You'll have to add SaveChanges() to the interfaces in order to call it. Or cast the variable to DbContext. – Keith Payne Jun 28 '15 at 3:03
  • thats very nice. I just want to know.. what if I want to make generic repositories from these interface db instances.. Then how would I get the db.Set<T>() method?? – Awais Mahmood Feb 12 '16 at 7:03

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