0

The code below works as intended if I do re.search("(\d+)x".

However if I add an alternative search re.search("(\d+)x|x(\d+)" I get:

TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'NoneType' objects

Code:

fundleverage = None
regex_fundleverage = None
regex_fundleverage = re.search(r"(\d+)x|x(\d+)", instrument_name, flags=re.IGNORECASE)
if funddirection == "Long" and not regex_fundleverage == None:
    fundleverage = "+" + regex_fundleverage.group(1) + "00"
if funddirection == "Short" and not regex_fundleverage == None:
    fundleverage = "-" + regex_fundleverage.group(1) + "00"
print "Fundleverage: %s" % fundleverage

The error is of course due to that I try to concatenate str "+" and "00" with None.

My question is why selecting group(1)works when there is only one lookup in re.search(), but does not work if there are two alternative lookups.

The string it's searching does not contain both alternatives "(\d+)x" and "x(\d+)", only one is possible.

Example str:

"Boost LevDAX 3x Daily ETP"
"ComStage LevDAX x2 UCITS ETF"
  • Don't use the above regex in re.search if you want two outputs since search will stop once it finds the first match. – Avinash Raj Jun 27 '15 at 10:24
  • @AvinashRaj Only one of the alternatives are present in the string. Am I understanding it right that it will only "look" for the first alternative but not for the second, thus making it "None" if not present? – Winterflags Jun 27 '15 at 10:26
  • Never compare to None – TheGeorgeous Jun 27 '15 at 10:28
  • If I search for re.findall I get: AttributeError: 'list' object has no attribute 'group' – Winterflags Jun 27 '15 at 10:34
  • re.findall will return a list of found items not groups – Iron Fist Jun 27 '15 at 10:35
5

I would do it this way:

regex_fundleverage = re.findall('(?<=x)\d+|\d+(?=x)',instrument_name, flags=re.IGNORECASE) 

if funddirection == "Long" and regex_fundleverage:
    fundleverage = "+" + regex_fundleverage[0] + "00"

if funddirection == "Short" and regex_fundleverage:
    fundleverage = "-" + regex_fundleverage[0] + "00"

print "Fundleverage: %s" % fundleverage
  • Returns None, I'm not sure if the regex finds anything. Will try to find the error. – Winterflags Jun 27 '15 at 11:15
  • It was missing and not regex_fundleverage = None:, can you please update your answer? It works now :) – Winterflags Jun 27 '15 at 11:18
  • 1
    @Winterflags...Thanks for pointing that out, actually, you can just do and regex_fundleverage : (no need for and not regex_fundleverage == None:) .. it means: and if there is anything in regex_fundleverage and if regex_fundleverage was empty it will be False .. :) – Iron Fist Jun 27 '15 at 11:26
  • 1
    Oh, I see. Thanks :) I kept fundleverage = None and regex_fundleverage = None in front of your code and it works now. I will go with this solution since it was really closest to the original implentation, but big thanks to everyone who assisted me! – Winterflags Jun 27 '15 at 11:32
2

if you were to pass just the first string your program would work ok. but when you pass the second string, the second group is matched. group(1) is None, while group(2) is 2.

I would rewrite your code to separate the two subexpression and use an if statement to decide which one matches.

2

Use regex to check if the string is in your desired form , and if it does then just extract the number you want by using \d+ since your string can contain only one number as follows:

Notice that the advantage of doing this is it throws an error if the leverage is not in desired format like x3x in your string

import re
fundleverage = None
regex_fundleverage = None
funddirection = "Long"
instrument_name = "ComStage LevDAX 3x UCITS ETF"
regex_fundleverage = re.search(r"(\b\d+x|x\d+\b)", instrument_name, flags=re.IGNORECASE)
if  regex_fundleverage:
    regex_fundleverage = re.search(r"(\d+)", regex_fundleverage.group(0), flags=re.IGNORECASE)
print(regex_fundleverage.group(0))
if funddirection == "Long" and not regex_fundleverage == None:
    fundleverage = "+" + regex_fundleverage.group(1) + "00"
if funddirection == "Short" and not regex_fundleverage == None:
    fundleverage = "-" + regex_fundleverage.group(1) + "00"
print "Fundleverage: %s" % fundleverage
  • 1
    @Winterflags , Nice :) – Pruthvi Raj Jun 27 '15 at 11:01
  • @Winterflags also consider accepting the answer if you are satisfied :) – Pruthvi Raj Jun 27 '15 at 11:03
2

I did use re.findall

x = re.findall(r'(?<=x)\d+|\d+(?=x)', s)

Then get the first element by specifying the first index like x[0] . You won't get None value.

or

You may also use re.search function without capturing groups.

re.search(r'(?<=x)\d+|\d+(?=x)', s).group()

I think you want tjis,

>>> import re
>>> s = "Boost LevDAX 3x Daily ETP"
>>> re.sub(r'\d+(?=x)|(?<=x)\d+', r'+\g<0>00', s)
'Boost LevDAX +300x Daily ETP'

OR

>>> s = "Boost LevDAX 3x Daily ETP"
>>> re.sub(r'(\d+)x|x(\d+)', lambda m: '+'+m.group(1)+'00' if m.group(1) else '+' + m.group(2) + '00', s)
'Boost LevDAX +300 Daily ETP'
>>> s = "ComStage LevDAX x2 UCITS ETF"
>>> re.sub(r'(\d+)x|x(\d+)', lambda m: '+'+m.group(1)+'00' if m.group(1) else '+' + m.group(2) + '00', s)
'ComStage LevDAX +200 UCITS ETF'

According to your comment, there is only one nox or xno present in your input strings. If yes, then you may try this,

>>> s = "ComStage LevDAX x2 UCITS ETF"
>>> fundleverage = re.sub(r'.*(?:(\d+)x|x(\d+)).*', lambda m: '+'+m.group(1)+'00' if m.group(1) else '+' + m.group(2) + '00', s)
>>> print fundleverage
  • Hmm. The re.sub solution correctly substitutes to +300 but keeps the entire string "Boost LevDAX +300 Daily ETP". It should pass on only "+300" to variable fundleverage. Other than that, it seems good. – Winterflags Jun 27 '15 at 11:08
  • 1
    @Winterflags check my update.. – Avinash Raj Jun 27 '15 at 11:12

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