53

I have been using Math.Round(myNumber, MidpointRounding.ToEven) in C# to do my server-side rounding, however, the user needs to know 'live' what the result of the server-side operation will be which means (avoiding an Ajax request) creating a JavaScript method to replicate the MidpointRounding.ToEven method used by C#.

MidpointRounding.ToEven is Gaussian/banker's rounding, a very common rounding method for accounting systems described here.

Does anyone have any experience with this? I have found examples online, but they do not round to a given number of decimal places...

  • Good question. Was this script one of the examples you found? It looks like it might be suitable but I'm no expert on the subject :-) – Andy E Jun 24 '10 at 10:26
  • Its close! But unforunately doesnt work with negative numbers - I'll do some changes to it and post here... Thanks :) – Jimbo Jun 27 '10 at 11:12
75
function evenRound(num, decimalPlaces) {
    var d = decimalPlaces || 0;
    var m = Math.pow(10, d);
    var n = +(d ? num * m : num).toFixed(8); // Avoid rounding errors
    var i = Math.floor(n), f = n - i;
    var e = 1e-8; // Allow for rounding errors in f
    var r = (f > 0.5 - e && f < 0.5 + e) ?
                ((i % 2 == 0) ? i : i + 1) : Math.round(n);
    return d ? r / m : r;
}

console.log( evenRound(1.5) ); // 2
console.log( evenRound(2.5) ); // 2
console.log( evenRound(1.535, 2) ); // 1.54
console.log( evenRound(1.525, 2) ); // 1.52

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/NbvBp/

For what looks like a more rigorous treatment of this (I've never used it), you could try this BigNumber implementation.

  • 1
    Sweetly done! Works for negatives too. +2 :P – Jimbo Jun 27 '10 at 11:20
  • 15
    This answer is so money. – user74754 Jun 30 '12 at 0:23
  • 3
    I'd like to suggest two more additions. Firstly I would check for overflow/underflow on the Math.pow(10, d) expression (at least). On this error AND when decimalPlaces is positive, return num, else re-raise that exception. Secondly, to compensate for IEEE binary conversion errors, I would change f == 0.5 to something like f >= 0.499999999 && f <= 0.500000001 - depending on your choice of 'epsilon' (not sure if .toFixed(epsilon) is enough). Then you're golden! – Marius Oct 4 '13 at 15:32
  • @Marius: Good points. My knowledge of JS numbers was sketchy when I wrote this and not much better now, so I'll read up and then update this. – Tim Down Oct 4 '13 at 15:40
  • 2
    Actually evenRound(0.545,2) should round to 0.54, not 0.55, therefore the function returns it correctly. It behaves as for round down if the digit to the left is even, which in this case is 4. – Alex Burdusel Dec 8 '15 at 20:11
6

The accepted answer does round to a given number of places. In the process it calls toFixed which converts the number to a string. Since this is expensive, I offer the solution below. It rounds a number ending in 0.5 to the nearest even number. It does not handle rounding to an arbitrary number of places.

function even_p(n){
  return (0===(n%2));
};

function bankers_round(x){
    var r = Math.round(x);
    return (((((x>0)?x:(-x))%1)===0.5)?((even_p(r))?r:(r-1)):r);
};
  • your function does not allow specifying the number of decimals to keep – Alex Burdusel Dec 8 '15 at 19:57
  • True. That is left for the redder :-). Read: all I needed was correct rounding to an integer. – soegaard Dec 8 '15 at 20:00
  • That's great solution, thank you! Here is how you make it work for decimals. Looks like I'll have to post a separate answer to show the code... – xims Oct 12 '16 at 13:11
5

That's a great solution from @soegaard. Here is a small change that makes it work for decimal points:

bankers_round(n:number, d:number=0) {
    var x = n * Math.pow(10, d);
    var r = Math.round(x);
    var br = (((((x>0)?x:(-x))%1)===0.5)?(((0===(r%2)))?r:(r-1)):r);
    return br / Math.pow(10, d);
}

And while at it - here are some tests:

console.log(" 1.5 -> 2 : ", bankers_round(1.5) );
console.log(" 2.5 -> 2 : ", bankers_round(2.5) );
console.log(" 1.535 -> 1.54 : ", bankers_round(1.535, 2) );
console.log(" 1.525 -> 1.52 : ", bankers_round(1.525, 2) );

console.log(" 0.5 -> 0 : ", bankers_round(0.5) );
console.log(" 1.5 -> 2 : ", bankers_round(1.5) );
console.log(" 0.4 -> 0 : ", bankers_round(0.4) );
console.log(" 0.6 -> 1 : ", bankers_round(0.6) );
console.log(" 1.4 -> 1 : ", bankers_round(1.4) );
console.log(" 1.6 -> 2 : ", bankers_round(1.6) );

console.log(" 23.5 -> 24 : ", bankers_round(23.5) );
console.log(" 24.5 -> 24 : ", bankers_round(24.5) );
console.log(" -23.5 -> -24 : ", bankers_round(-23.5) );
console.log(" -24.5 -> -24 : ", bankers_round(-24.5) );
  • Note: Some of these conventions are ES6 only (ex: default parm values). – Spade Oct 12 '16 at 13:25
2

This is the unusual stackoverflow where the bottom answers are better than the accepted. Just cleaned up @xims solution and made a bit more legible:

function bankersRound(n, d=2) {
    var x = n * Math.pow(10, d);
    var r = Math.round(x);
    var br = Math.abs(x) % 1 === 0.5 ? (r % 2 === 0 ? r : r-1) : r;
    return br / Math.pow(10, d);
}
2
const isEven = (value: number) => value % 2 === 0;
const isHalf = (value: number) => {
    const epsilon = 1e-8;
    const remainder = Math.abs(value) % 1;

    return remainder > .5 - epsilon && remainder < .5 + epsilon;
};

const roundHalfToEvenShifted = (value: number, factor: number) => {
    const shifted = value * factor;
    const rounded = Math.round(shifted);
    const modifier = value < 0 ? -1 : 1;

    return !isEven(rounded) && isHalf(shifted) ? rounded - modifier : rounded;
};

const roundHalfToEven = (digits: number, unshift: boolean) => {
    const factor = 10 ** digits;

    return unshift
        ? (value: number) => roundHalfToEvenShifted(value, factor) / factor
        : (value: number) => roundHalfToEvenShifted(value, factor);
};

const roundDollarsToCents = roundHalfToEven(2, false);
const roundCurrency = roundHalfToEven(2, true);
  • If you do not like the overhead of calling toFixed()
  • Want to be able to supply an arbitrary scale
  • Don't want to introduce floating-point errors
  • Want to have readable, reusable code

roundHalfToEven is a function that generates a fixed scale rounding function. I do my currency operations on cents, rather than dollars, to avoid introducing FPEs. The unshift param exists to avoid the overhead of unshifting and shifting again for those operations.

0

Stricly speaking, all of these implementations should handle the case of a negative number of digits to round to.

It is an edge case, but still it would be wise to disallow it (or be very clear about what that means, for example -2 is rounding to the nearest amount of hundreds).

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