1

I'm using nested transactions by using IDBConecction interface on c#. I have to methods that insert data into 2 different tables, but when it comes to the second insert the first insert transaction locks the second one causing a timeout exception.

public void FirstInsert()
{
    using (var cn = new Connection().GetConnection())
    {
        cn.Open();
        using (var tran = cn.BeginTransaction())
        {
            try
            {
                //1st insert
                SecondInsert() //calling second insert method
                tran.Commit();                
            }
            catch
            {
                tran.Rollback();
            }
        }
    }
}

public void SecondInsert()
{
    using (var cn = new Connection().GetConnection())
    {
        cn.Open();
        using (var tran = cn.BeginTransaction())
        {
            try
            {
                //2nd insert, this one fails
                tran.Commit();                
            }
            catch
            {
                tran.Rollback();
            }
        }
    }
}

When I check on SqlServer fisrt insert has the SPID 56, then when the second insert is being performed with SPID 57, and I use

exec sp_who2

In the column "BlkBy" for SPID 57 it says it is blocked by SPID 56.

How can I overcome these problem?

  • Can you show the connection strings and inserts? Inserts to two different tables shouldn't block each other, and normally two identical connections from the same client would share a distributed transaction, but that could be disabled in the connection string. It doesn't make sense to open two connections based on the sample code but I expect you have a reason to. Using the MARS connection string option (multiple active result sets) can allow you to retrieve results from two queries in parallel, but from your description you shouldn't need this. – Rattle Jun 27 '15 at 23:13
  • @Rattle little correction: Two SqlConnection objects never share the same transaction. Even if it's distributed it still appears as two sessions to SQL Server. – usr Jun 27 '15 at 23:16
1

Use one connection for both operations. This likely involves passing the connection object around.

Usually, the connection+transaction per request pattern solves this issue well. Opening a connection in all kinds of methods is a code smell. It shows that the infrastructure fails to handle that.

| improve this answer | |
0

You are doing correct but there is no need of a separate connection object and transaction object in your second method since call to the secondinsert() is already inside transaction scope. Your code can simply be

public void FirstInsert(){
    using (var cn = new Connection().GetConnection()){
        cn.Open();
        using (var tran = cn.BeginTransaction()){
            try{
                //1st insert
                SecondInsert() //calling second insert method
                tran.Commit();                
            }
            catch{
                tran.Rollback();
            }
        }
    }
}

public void SecondInsert(){

               //perform second insert operation             
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • I need a transaction and connection in every method cause I also need to call 2nd method from other methods beside the one from the example. Basically I need every commitable transaction to be in a separate method in order to avoid repetition, and also to be these methods to be called everywhere. – jecarfor Jun 27 '15 at 23:50
  • @jecarfor, in that case consider passing the same connection/trans object to your second method as well and use it. – Rahul Jun 27 '15 at 23:53
  • But if I call .Commit() from the second method, does the whole transaction gets commited? It's because after the second insert I might need another insert to be called, and as I mentioned before, I need almost every insert/update to be in a separate method in case I only need to call It from another place, for example calling just 2nd insert. I want to have something similar to using the [Autocomplete(true)] attribute in WCF, but without WCF, which by using the proper binding keeps all transactions track until service call has ended without Fault Exception. – jecarfor Jun 29 '15 at 3:23

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