3

Let's say I have a number in decimal format: 5

its binary version is: 00101

I would like to write a function that takes the decimal number x

and returns all other decimal numbers that have a single digit difference (in their binary forms) from the original one:

so for the example above the neighbors are:

10101 01101 00111 00001 00100

and the corresponding decimals are:

21 13 7 1 4

I would like a solution that is computationally efficient and doesn't take a long time even if I have say a million digits.

Is this possible to do?

1

I think you're asking how to take as input a number 5 and to return all neighboring binary values. To do this, you need to convert the number to a useful binary format (just the bits you want to flip), flip each bit, and return the result:

library(R.utils)
bin.neighbors <- function(x, num.neighbors=NA) {
  # Get the bits with the appropriate amount of padding
  bits <- as.numeric(unlist(strsplit(intToBin(x), "")))
  if (!is.na(num.neighbors) & num.neighbors > length(bits)) {
    bits <- c(rep(0, num.neighbors-length(bits)), bits)
  }

  # Build a matrix where each column is a bit vector of a neighbor
  mat <- matrix(bits, length(bits), length(bits))
  diag(mat) <- 1-diag(mat)

  # Return the decimal values of the neighbors using strtoi
  apply(mat, 2, function(x) strtoi(paste0(x, collapse=""), 2))
}
bin.neighbors(5, 5)
# [1] 21 13  1  7  4

Because each number has a number of binary representations with different numbers of leading 0s (e.g. 5 can be represented as 101, 0101, 00101, 000101, 0000101, etc.), I added an argument num.neighbors to specify the length of the output vector from the function. You can pass NA to obtain an output vector equal to the number of bits in the binary representation of the input with no leading zeros.

  • can this be generalized to strings that differ in exactly 2 digits, 3 digits etc? – user1723765 Aug 20 '15 at 11:36
  • @user1723765 please see this new question for how to generalize the excellent answer by alexis_laz. – josliber Aug 20 '15 at 13:56
10

I've no idea how trial and error got me here, but it looks valid unless I've messed up binaries and decimals:

bin_neighs = function(x, n) bitwXor(x, (2 ^ (0:(n - 1))))
bin_neighs(5, 5)
#[1]  4  7  1 13 21
  • 2
    Excellent simple solution! It's much, much faster. Microbenchmark on my machine shows median times of 7.6 microseconds for your method, 392 for josilber's and 664 for mine. The only things I would do is change the name from ff to avoid confusion with the package of the same name and change the = to <- for style reasons. – Nick Kennedy Jun 28 '15 at 21:02
  • can this be generalized to strings that differ in exactly 2 digits, 3 digits etc? – user1723765 Aug 20 '15 at 11:36
1

Here's another way using magrittr's pipe:

binNeighbours <- function(a, numNeighbours = ceiling(log2(a))) {
    rep(a, numNeighbours) %>%
    outer(., seq(.) - 1, function(x, y) x %/% (2 ^ y) %% 2) %>%
    `diag<-`(., 1 - diag(.)) %>%
    `%*%`(2 ^(0:(nrow(.) - 1))) %>%
    `[`(, 1)
  }
  • can this be generalized to strings that differ in exactly 2 digits, 3 digits etc? – user1723765 Aug 20 '15 at 11:36

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.