147

I'm looking for a way to change the CSS rules for pseudo-class selectors (such as :link, :hover, etc.) from JavaScript.

So an analogue of the CSS code: a:hover { color: red } in JS.

I couldn't find the answer anywhere else; if anyone knows that this is something browsers do not support, that would be a helpful result as well.

12 Answers 12

213

You can't style a pseudo-class on a particular element alone, in the same way that you can't have a pseudo-class in an inline style="..." attribute (as there is no selector).

You can do it by altering the stylesheet, for example by adding the rule:

#elid:hover { background: red; }

assuming each element you want to affect has a unique ID to allow it to be selected.

In theory the document you want is http://www.w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-2-Style/Overview.html which means you can (given a pre-existing embedded or linked stylesheet) using syntax like:

document.styleSheets[0].insertRule('#elid:hover { background-color: red; }', 0);
document.styleSheets[0].cssRules[0].style.backgroundColor= 'red';

IE, of course, requires its own syntax:

document.styleSheets[0].addRule('#elid:hover', 'background-color: red', 0);
document.styleSheets[0].rules[0].style.backgroundColor= 'red';

Older and minor browsers are likely not to support either syntax. Dynamic stylesheet-fiddling is rarely done because it's quite annoying to get right, rarely needed, and historically troublesome.

6
30

I threw together a small library for this since I do think there are valid use cases for manipulating stylesheets in JS. Reasons being:

  • Setting styles that must be calculated or retrieved - for example setting the user's preferred font-size from a cookie.
  • Setting behavioural (not aesthetic) styles, especially for UI widget/plugin developers. Tabs, carousels, etc, often require some basic CSS simply to function - shouldn't demand a stylesheet for the core function.
  • Better than inline styles since CSS rules apply to all current and future elements, and don't clutter the HTML when viewing in Firebug / Developer Tools.
0
19

Just place the css in a template string.

const cssTemplateString = `.foo:[psuedoSelector]{prop: value}`;

Then create a style element and place the string in the style tag and attach it to the document.

const styleTag = document.createElement("style");
styleTag.innerHTML = cssTemplateString;
document.head.insertAdjacentElement('beforeend', styleTag);

Specificity will take care of the rest. Then you can remove and add style tags dynamically. This is a simple alternative to libraries and messing with the stylesheet array in the DOM. Happy Coding!

3
  • insertAdjacentElement requires 2 arguments in the the major browsers (Chrome, Firefox, Edge), the first of which establishing the position relative to the reference element (see here). Is this a recent change ? (Added 'beforeend' to the answer).
    – collapsar
    Jul 16, 2018 at 14:24
  • I don't like this solution. Your CSS won't be cached.
    – StackSlave
    Nov 6, 2020 at 2:00
  • @StackSlave Who cares and why?
    – Michael
    Aug 28, 2022 at 23:19
18

A function to cope with the cross-browser stuff:

addCssRule = function(/* string */ selector, /* string */ rule) {
  if (document.styleSheets) {
    if (!document.styleSheets.length) {
      var head = document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0];
      head.appendChild(bc.createEl('style'));
    }

    var i = document.styleSheets.length-1;
    var ss = document.styleSheets[i];

    var l=0;
    if (ss.cssRules) {
      l = ss.cssRules.length;
    } else if (ss.rules) {
      // IE
      l = ss.rules.length;
    }

    if (ss.insertRule) {
      ss.insertRule(selector + ' {' + rule + '}', l);
    } else if (ss.addRule) {
      // IE
      ss.addRule(selector, rule, l);
    }
  }
};
0
8

My trick is using an attribute selector. Attributes are easier to set up by javascript.

css

.class{ /*normal css... */}
.class[special]:after{ content: 'what you want'}

javascript

  function setSpecial(id){ document.getElementById(id).setAttribute('special', '1'); }

html

<element id='x' onclick="setSpecial(this.id)"> ...  
5
  • 4
    This solution uses jQuery – introducing a dependency the size of jQuery for something as simple as this, when the questioner asked for pure Javascript, is bad. Mar 20, 2013 at 14:55
  • Although pratically all websites nowadays USE jquery, I will modify it to use pure javascript. May 2, 2013 at 1:48
  • 1
    And exactly how does this method gets to change the CSS attributes of the .class[special]:after pseudo element, like, the background color or anything else?
    – andreszs
    Dec 21, 2014 at 2:01
  • 1
    Thanks @SergioAbreu. By using this with some of my tricks I was able to stop the css keyframe auto run on webpage load. May 19, 2022 at 13:24
  • I am happy to have helped @ShohidulAlam May 20, 2022 at 23:34
5

There is another alternative. Instead of manipulating the pseudo-classes directly, create real classes that model the same things, like a "hover" class or a "visited" class. Style the classes with the usual "." syntax and then you can use JavaScript to add or remove classes from an element when the appropriate event fires.

4
  • 2
    That doesn't work for :before and :after pseudo classes.
    – jbyrd
    Oct 31, 2014 at 23:04
  • And that's not applicable to change background image with a value retrieved via AJAX.
    – andreszs
    Dec 21, 2014 at 1:52
  • 2
    @jbyrd, :before & :after are pseudo elements, not classes.
    – Roy Ling
    Oct 8, 2015 at 6:59
  • @royling - yes, thanks for the correction! Can't seem to edit my comment.
    – jbyrd
    Oct 8, 2015 at 23:07
5

Instead of directly setting pseudo-class rules with javascript, you can set the rules differently in different CSS files, and then use Javascript to switch one stylesheet off and to switch another on. A method is described at A List Apart (qv. for more detail).

Set up the CSS files as,

<link rel="stylesheet" href="always_on.css">
<link rel="stylesheet" title="usual" href="preferred.css"> <!-- on by default -->
<link rel="alternate stylesheet" title="strange" href="alternate.css"> <!-- off by default -->

And then switch between them using javascript:

function setActiveStyleSheet(title) {
   var i, a, main;
   for(i=0; (a = document.getElementsByTagName("link")<i>); i++) {
     if(a.getAttribute("rel").indexOf("style") != -1
        && a.getAttribute("title")) {
       a.disabled = true;
       if(a.getAttribute("title") == title) a.disabled = false;
     }
   }
}
1
  • What if you need to dinamically change the class to a value retrieved by an AJAX request? You cannot create a CSS file now...
    – andreszs
    Dec 21, 2014 at 1:51
5

One option you could consider is using CSS variables. The idea is that you set the property you want to change to a CSS variable. Then, within your JS, change that variable's value.

See example below

function changeColor(newColor) {
  document.documentElement.style.setProperty("--anchor-hover-color", newColor);
  // ^^^^^^^^^^^-- select the root 
}
:root {
  --anchor-hover-color: red;
}

a:hover { 
  color: var(--anchor-hover-color); 
}
<a href="#">Hover over me</a>

<button onclick="changeColor('lime')">Change to lime</button>
<button onclick="changeColor('red')">Change to red</button>

1
  • 1
    This solution was by far the easiest route for me. Why deal with altering stylesheets through adding and removing rules? I was using the same logic for my sliders, and it works like a charm on setting dynamic caption (subtitle) font sizes in my video control.
    – mseifert
    Sep 16, 2022 at 20:38
2

As already stated this is not something that browsers support.

If you aren't coming up with the styles dynamically (i.e. pulling them out of a database or something) you should be able to work around this by adding a class to the body of the page.

The css would look something like:

a:hover { background: red; }
.theme1 a:hover { background: blue; }

And the javascript to change this would be something like:

// Look up some good add/remove className code if you want to do this
// This is really simplified

document.body.className += " theme1";  
2
  • Out of curiousity, is element.classList.add not well supported? I keep seeing people doing element.className +=. Mar 13, 2014 at 7:41
  • 2
    classList is a newer feature and doesn't look like it had good support until fairly recently (see caniuse.com/classlist) Apr 11, 2014 at 18:26
0

here is a solution including two functions: addCSSclass adds a new css class to the document, and toggleClass turns it on

The example shows adding a custom scrollbar to a div

// If newState is provided add/remove theClass accordingly, otherwise toggle theClass
function toggleClass(elem, theClass, newState) {
  var matchRegExp = new RegExp('(?:^|\\s)' + theClass + '(?!\\S)', 'g');
  var add = (arguments.length > 2 ? newState : (elem.className.match(matchRegExp) === null));

  elem.className = elem.className.replace(matchRegExp, ''); // clear all
  if (add) elem.className += ' ' + theClass;
}

function addCSSclass(rules) {
  var style = document.createElement("style");
  style.appendChild(document.createTextNode("")); // WebKit hack :(
  document.head.appendChild(style);
  var sheet = style.sheet;

  rules.forEach((rule, index) => {
    try {
      if ("insertRule" in sheet) {
        sheet.insertRule(rule.selector + "{" + rule.rule + "}", index);
      } else if ("addRule" in sheet) {
        sheet.addRule(rule.selector, rule.rule, index);
      }
    } catch (e) {
      // firefox can break here          
    }
    
  })
}

let div = document.getElementById('mydiv');
addCSSclass([{
    selector: '.narrowScrollbar::-webkit-scrollbar',
    rule: 'width: 5px'
  },
  {
    selector: '.narrowScrollbar::-webkit-scrollbar-thumb',
    rule: 'background-color:#808080;border-radius:100px'
  }
]);
toggleClass(div, 'narrowScrollbar', true);
<div id="mydiv" style="height:300px;width:300px;border:solid;overflow-y:scroll">
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed a eros metus. Nunc dui felis, accumsan nec aliquam quis, fringilla quis tellus. Nulla cursus mauris nibh, at faucibus justo tincidunt eget. Sed sodales eget erat consectetur consectetur. Vivamus
  a diam volutpat, ullamcorper justo eu, dignissim ante. Aenean turpis tortor, fringilla quis efficitur eleifend, iaculis id quam. Quisque non turpis in lacus finibus auctor. Morbi ullamcorper felis ut nulla venenatis fringilla. Praesent imperdiet velit
  nec sodales sodales. Etiam eget dui sollicitudin, tempus tortor non, porta nibh. Quisque eu efficitur velit. Nulla facilisi. Sed varius a erat ac volutpat. Sed accumsan maximus feugiat. Mauris id malesuada dui. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur
  adipiscing elit. Sed a eros metus. Nunc dui felis, accumsan nec aliquam quis, fringilla quis tellus. Nulla cursus mauris nibh, at faucibus justo tincidunt eget. Sed sodales eget erat consectetur consectetur. Vivamus a diam volutpat, ullamcorper justo
  eu, dignissim ante. Aenean turpis tortor, fringilla quis efficitur eleifend, iaculis id quam. Quisque non turpis in lacus finibus auctor. Morbi ullamcorper felis ut nulla venenatis fringilla. Praesent imperdiet velit nec sodales sodales. Etiam eget
  dui sollicitudin, tempus tortor non, porta nibh. Quisque eu efficitur velit. Nulla facilisi. Sed varius a erat ac volutpat. Sed accumsan maximus feugiat. Mauris id malesuada dui.
</div>

-1

In jquery you can easily set hover pseudo classes.

$("p").hover(function(){
$(this).css("background-color", "yellow");
}, function(){
$(this).css("background-color", "pink");
});
-4

If you use REACT , There is something called radium. It is so useful here :

  • Add handlers to props if interactive styles are specified, e.g. onMouseEnter for :hover, wrapping existing handlers if necessary

  • If any of the handlers are triggered, e.g. by hovering, Radium calls setState to update a Radium-specific field on the components state object

  • On re-render, resolve any interactive styles that apply, e.g. :hover, by looking up the element's key or ref in the Radium-specific state

1
  • The question didn't mention React.
    – db2
    Jun 13, 2022 at 16:35

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