8

I'm using Sqlite database and System.Data.SQLite 1.0.92 There is 2 table here:


Table Person:

PersonId

PersonName


Table Student:

StudentId

PersonId(reference table Person FK)

StudentNo


Now every time I get the Persons Collection in EF5:

using (var ctx = new myEntities)
{
  AllPersons = ctx.Persons.ToList();
}

There is also has AllPersons.student collection will include in the result;

But I don't need it. Of course that's just an example, There is a lot of big table has so many references, it always has performance problems here because of that.

So I'm trying to do not let it in my result. So I change it:

using (var ctx = new myEntities)
{
      ctx.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
      ctx.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
      AllPersons= ctx.Persons.ToList();
}

Now fine, because AllPersons.student collection will always be null

But now I found: If I get Person and Student together:

using (var ctx = new myEntities)
{
    ctx.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
    ctx.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
    AllPersons= ctx.Persons.ToList();
    AllStudents = ctx.Student.ToList();
}

Now the reference still include in.

So Is there anyway to don't let the reference include in any time in this situation? Thank you.


Update

For some friends request, I explain why I need it:

1: When I convert it to json it will be a dead loop. even I already use Json.net ReferenceLoopHandling, the json size very big to crash the server.(if no references, it's just a very small json)

2:Every time I get the client data and need to save, it will display exception about model state, until I set it to null.

Example:

using (myEntities ctx = new myEntities())
 {
 ctx.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
 ctx.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;



  Person model= ThisIsAModel();

  model.students = null;  // This is a key, I need set the students collection references to null , otherwise it will throw exception

  ctx.Entry(model).State = EntityState.Modified;
  ctx.SaveChanges();

}

3: This is More important problem. I already get all data and cache on the server. But It will let the loading time very long when server start. (because the data and references are so many, that is the main problem), I don't know I'll meet what kind of problem again....

public List<Person> PersonsCache; // global cache
public List<Student> StudentsCache; // global cache
using (myEntities ctx = new myEntities())
 {
     ctx.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
     ctx.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
 // There is so many references and data, will let it very slow , when I first time get the all cache. even I only get the Person model, not other , just because some Collection has some references problem. It will very slow....

   PersonsCache = ctx.Persons.ToList();
   StudentsCache= ctx.Student.ToList();
}
  • Can your post your entity object? I think removing virtual from navigation properties removes lazy loading. – Andres Castro Jul 16 '15 at 2:23
  • @acastr7 Sorry I don't understand what are you mean, what do you want? the entity is auto generate by visual studio – qakmak Jul 17 '15 at 3:08
  • Have you tried changing the table relationship to inheritance to see if that solves your problem? Students would have a person relationship but persons would not have a student relationship. – TombMedia Aug 24 '15 at 20:40
  • @TombMedia, No, Because sometimes I need it , when I need Person and students references together, it will let it failed, do I think that's not a good idea. For example: default mode (for server cache) I don't need students references. But when I search for some statistic, I need these get together. – qakmak Aug 29 '15 at 4:02
3
+100

The Problem

As you said, when you load both of Parent and Child lists even when LazyLoading is disabled, and then look in parent.Childs you see child items has been loaded too.

var db = new YourDbContext();
db.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
var parentList= db.YourParentSet.ToList();
var childList= db.YourChildSet.ToList();

What happened? Why childs are included in a parent?

The childs under a parent entity, are those you loaded using db.YourChildSet.ToList(); Exactly themselves; In fact Entity Framework never loads childs for a parent again but because of relation between parent and child in edmx, they are listed there.


Is that affect Perforemance?

According to the fact that childs only load once, It has no impact on perforemance because of loading data.


But for serialization or something else's sake, How can I get rid of it?

you can use these solutions:

Solution 1:

Use 2 different instance of YourDbContext:

var db1 = new YourDbContext();
db1.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
var parentList= db.YourParentSet.ToList();

var db2 = new YourDbContext();
db2.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
var childList= db.YourChildSet.ToList();
  • Now when you look in parent.Childs there is no Child in it.

Solution 2:

use Projection and shape your output to your will and use them.

var db1 = new YourDbContext();
db1.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
var parentList= db.YourParentSet
                  .Select(x=>new /*Model()*/{
                      Property1=x.Property1,
                      Property2=x.Property2, ...
                  }).ToList();
  • This way when serialization there is nothing annoying there.
  • Using a custom Model class is optional and in some cases is recommended.

Additional Resources

As a developer who use Entity Framework reading these resources is strongly recommended:

  • " It has no impact on perforemance because of loading data." I don't agree with it, because long time ago after I realize it's very slow, I already use you second solution, and it's very fast. which mean it's a big performance problem. And about you second solution as like I already told other friends: It will be problem when I modify the model, EF will throw exception because the model not the ORM original model. But the first solution I had never used before, because I also worry open, close, open the databases not a good way. But I'll try. – qakmak Aug 29 '15 at 4:12
  • - I am pretty sure that according to the fact that childs only load once, there is no impact on performance because of loading data. If you log sql commands that execute against database (using ef log feature) you will see getting all childs executes only one time. So if you have any performance issue it is for something else. – Reza Aghaei Aug 29 '15 at 10:55
  • - About opening and closing connection. When you use connection pooling the overhead is completely negligible. – Reza Aghaei Aug 29 '15 at 11:01
  • Do not treat a DbContext as a DB connection, these are different levels of abstraction. DB connections are pooled and you don't need to worry about them. It's not association fixup either - that's almost negligable. DbContext, on the other hand, is caching and tracking entities, which seems like the real reason of your perf problems. You see improvement with projections simply because they are not tracked/cached. – Jacek Gorgoń Aug 29 '15 at 21:49
  • 1
    Cold vs Warm is not related to Context creation. Yes, it says "medium" (for cold and warm) but that medium is quite negligable compared to the Cold vs Warm or even actual data fetching (which is High). Even prior to EF 6, Context creation was quite cheap. As for connections, they are still pooled on the ADO.NET level and regardless, I believe the point stands that OP should not worry about them (open/close is not likely an issue here). – Jacek Gorgoń Aug 29 '15 at 22:31
2

I'll focus on your third problem because that seems to be your most urgent problem. Then I'll try to give some hints on the other two problems.

There are two Entity Framework features you should be aware of:

  1. When you load data into a context, Entity Framework will try to connect the objects wherever they're associated. This is called relationship fixup. You can't stop EF from doing that. So if you load Persons and Students separately, a Person's Students collection will contain students, even though you didn't Include() them.

  2. By default, a context caches all data it fetches from the database. Moreover, it stores meta data about the objects in its change tracker: copies of their individual properties and all associations. So by loading many objects the internal cache grows, but also the size of the meta data. And the ever-running relationship fixup process gets slower and slower (although it may help to postpone it by turning off automatic change detection). All in all, the context gets bloated and slow like a flabby rhino.

I understand you want to cache data in separate collections for each entity. Two simple modifications will make this much quicker:

  • Evade the inevitable relationship fixup by loading each collection by a separate context
  • Stop caching (in the context) and change tracking by getting the data with AsNoTracking.

Doing this, your code will look like this:

public List<Person> PersonsCache;
public List<Student> StudentsCache;

using (myEntities ctx = new myEntities())
{
     ctx.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
     PersonsCache = ctx.Persons
                       .AsNoTracking()
                       .ToList();
}

using (myEntities ctx = new myEntities())
{
     ctx.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
     StudentsCache= ctx.Student
                       .AsNoTracking()
                       .ToList();
}

The reason for turning off ProxyCreationEnabled is that you'll get light objects and that you'll never inadvertently trigger lazy loading afterwards (throwing an exception that the context is no longer available).

Now you'll have cached objects that are not inter-related and that get fetched as fast as it gets with EF. If this isn't fast enough you'll have to resort to other tools, like Dapper.

By the way, your very first code snippet and problem description...

using (var ctx = new myEntities)
{
  AllPersons = ctx.Persons.ToList();
}

There is also has AllPersons.student collection will include in the result;

...suggest that Entity Framework spontaneously performs eager loading (of students) without you Include-ing them. I have to assume that your code snippet is not complete. EF never, ever automatically executes eager loading. (Unless, maybe, you have some outlandish and buggy query provider).

As for the first problem, the serialization. You should be able to tackle that in a similar way as shown above. Just load the data you want to serialize in isolation and disable proxy creation. Or, as suggested by others, serialize view models or anonymous types exactly containing what you need there.

As for the second problem, the validation exception. I can only imagine this to happen if you initialize a students collection by default, empty, Student objects. These are bound to be invalid. If this is not the case, I suggest you ask a new question about this specific problem, showing ample detail about the involved classes and mappings. That shouldn't be dealt with in this question.

  • Great. I'll try your solution later. But about :"EF never, ever automatically executes eager loading.", Are you sure? because Lazy loading and Proxy creation are enable(true) by the default. I think maybe that's why it include it in. – qakmak Aug 29 '15 at 4:44
  • That happens when you access a navigation property when lazy loading is enabled. It is loaded at that moment. Eager loading is when a navigation property is loaded from the database when the parent entity is loaded. That only happens when you use Include. So yes, when you load a Person and then access its Students it may look like the student were loaded with the person, but they weren't. – Gert Arnold Aug 29 '15 at 18:31
  • Sorry, you and another fried have some answer, but he gave the answer little bit early. that's why I gave him the bounty. But you answer is also clear and great. I hope you can understand. Thank you. – qakmak Aug 30 '15 at 7:11
  • Well, he didn't mention AsNoTracking which I think makes a significant difference. But it's your call. And I already have enough :) – Gert Arnold Aug 30 '15 at 8:09
  • Yes, It's also a important point for the performance. Thank you. I still will vote for you. – qakmak Aug 30 '15 at 8:19
0

If entities are auto generated, then copy paste it to own code and remove the relation generated like child collection and Foreign key. Or you don't need all this kind of the functionality might be can user lightweight framework like dapper

  • But only sometimes I need use it. I can't remove the relation. I just want to a good control. – qakmak Jul 18 '15 at 17:00
  • May be you can create a two separate context one context maintain relationship and one don't. Additional relation you can provide on model creation. entityframeworktutorial.net/code-first/… Using this one can provide the relationship. this will be build only when the relationship is provided. – Rohit Harkhani Jul 23 '15 at 4:34
0

In normally your student collection doesn't fill from database. it's fill when you reach to property. In addition if you use ToList() method so Entity Framework read data from data to fill your collection.

Pls check this. https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/jj574232.aspx#lazy https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/dd456846(v=vs.100).aspx

  • I even not use lazy load.... – qakmak Aug 2 '15 at 2:19
0

Is there anyway to don't let the reference include in any time in this situation?

The solution to this seems to be very simple: don't map the association. Remove the Student collection. Not much more I can say about it.

  • I know that kind of solution. But Sometimes I need it, and it auto generate by visual studio. I don't want remove it every time when I regenerate the models. – qakmak Aug 24 '15 at 5:52
  • "But Sometimes I need it" is not the same as "don't let the reference include in any time". But anyway, the unexplained part of your finding is why the AllPersons.student always seems to get included even if you don't Include() it. Are you sure this actually happens and that it's not lazy-loaded when you access the collection? You should be able to confirm this by logging the executed SQL. – Gert Arnold Aug 26 '15 at 10:21
  • Sorry for my bad English. As you see I already disable lazy load, But when I use multiple collection get the multiple table result. It will auto connect with each other. I'm really not understand why they design it like that. It give me a lot of trouble. Don't you find it never? I'm use`` EF5`` and System.Data.SQLite 1.0.92.0, I also go to the sqlite website: data.sqlite.org report this problem and give they this link. But they delete my report ticket. – qakmak Aug 26 '15 at 11:32
  • This "auto connecting" is just an EF feature, also called relationship fixup. You can't stop it, but why does it cause you trouble? – Gert Arnold Aug 26 '15 at 13:20
  • Because 1: When I convert it to json it will be a dead loop. even I already use Json.net ReferenceLoopHandling, the json size very big to crash the server.(if no references, it's just a very small json) 2:every time I get the client data and need to save, it will display exception about model state, until I set it to null. More important problem is 3: I already get all data and cache on the server. But It will let the loading time very long when server start. (because the data and references are so many, that is the main problem), I don't know I'll meet what kind of problem again.... – qakmak Aug 27 '15 at 4:31
0

Decorate any properties with [IgnoreDataMember] if you are using 4.5+

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.runtime.serialization.ignoredatamemberattribute(v=vs.110).aspx

Also sounds like you are trying to do table inheritance which is a different problem with EF

http://www.asp.net/mvc/overview/getting-started/getting-started-with-ef-using-mvc/implementing-inheritance-with-the-entity-framework-in-an-asp-net-mvc-application

http://www.entityframeworktutorial.net/code-first/inheritance-strategy-in-code-first.aspx

  • unfortunately I'm using .net 4 – qakmak Aug 24 '15 at 5:50
0

Explicitly select what you want to return from the Database.

Use Select new. With the select new clause, you can create new objects of an anonymous type as the result of a query and don't let the reference include in. This syntax allows you to construct anonymous data structures. These are created as they are evaluated (lazily). Like this:

using (var ctx = new myEntities())
{
     var AllPersons = ctx.People.Select(c => new {c.PersonId, c.PersonName}).ToList();
}

And even you don't need to disable lazy loading anymore.

After running query above:

The Result

This query currently allocates an anonymous type using select new { }, which requires you to use var. If you want allocate a known type, add it to your select clause:

private IEnumerable<MyClass> AllPersons;//global variable

using (var ctx = new myEntities())
{
     AllPersons = ctx.People
         .Select(c => new MyClass { PersonId = c.PersonId, PersonName = c.PersonName }).ToList();
}

And:

public class MyClass
{
    public string PersonId { get; set; }
    public string PersonName { get; set; }
}
0

If I understand you correctly, you're just trying to make sure you only get what you specifically ask for right?

This was mentioned a little above, but to do this correctly you just want to select an anonymous type.

var students = from s in _context.Students
               select new{
               StudentId,
               StudentNo};

Then, when you want to update this collection/object, I'd recommend use GraphDiff. GraphDiff really helps with the problems of disconnected entities and updates (https://github.com/refactorthis/GraphDiff)

So your method would look similar to this:

void UpdateStudent(Student student){
   _context.UpdateGraph(student, map =>
                    map
                        .AssociatedEntity(c => c.Person));
_context.SaveChanges();
}

This way, you're able to update whatever properties on an object, disconnected or not, and not worry about the association.

This is assuming that you correctly mapped your entities, and honestly, I find it easier to declare the object as a property, not just the ID, and use a mapping file to map it correctly.

So:

class Person{
int Id{get;set;}
string Name{get;set}
}

class Student{
int Id{get;set;}
string StudentNo{get;set;}
Person Person{get;set;}

public class StudentMap : EntityTypeConfiguration<Student>
    {
        public StudentMap()
        {
            // Primary Key
            HasKey(t => t.Id);


            // Table & Column Mappings
            ToTable("Students");
            Property(t => t.Id).HasColumnName("StudentId");

           // Relationships
            HasRequired(t => t.Person)                
                .HasForeignKey(d => d.PersonId);
  }
}

Hopefully that makes sense. You don't need to create a view model, but you definitely can. This way does make it easier to map disconnected items back to the database though.

-1

They are automatically linked in the ObjectContext by there EntityKey. Depending on what you want to do with your Persons and Students, you can Detach them from the ObjectContext :

using (var ctx = new myEntities)
{
    ctx.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
    ctx.Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
    AllPersons= ctx.Persons.ToList();
    foreach(var c in AllPersons)
    {
        ctx.Detach(c);
    }
    AllStudents = ctx.Student.ToList();
    foreach(var c in AllStudents )
    {
        ctx.Detach(c);
    }
}
  • It's the only way?? I can't do it every time add, get, edit the model.... – qakmak Jul 18 '15 at 16:59
  • You can create utility methods to do it.. But I don't understand how you are using EF. Sometimes you want the link, sometimes not, and when you don't want the link, you won't detach the objects manually. Can you explain a bit more your situation ? – stephanejulien Aug 2 '15 at 7:35
  • When I need.....? When I need the reference in the code then I want it. But I feel the way you point, not like a good solution, loos like there is no any different I'm just set the reference to null when I get. – qakmak Aug 2 '15 at 11:40
  • Automatic linking EntityObject by there EntityKey in the ObjectContext is a built-in functionnality of Entity Framework. I don't think you can disable this functionnality. And I don't think that the ObjectContext status is the same if you detach the objects or if you set the reference to null. – stephanejulien Aug 3 '15 at 6:19

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