1238

How can you convert a byte array to a hexadecimal string, and vice versa?

  • 5
    The accepted answer below appear to allocate a horrible amount of strings in the string to bytes conversion. I'm wondering how this impacts performance – Wim Coenen Mar 6 '09 at 16:41
  • 7
    The SoapHexBinary class does exactly what you want I think. – Mykroft Mar 31 '10 at 20:44

39 Answers 39

0

If performance matters, here's an optimized solution:

    static readonly char[] _hexDigits = "0123456789abcdef".ToCharArray();
    public static string ToHexString(this byte[] bytes)
    {
        char[] digits = new char[bytes.Length * 2];
        for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
        {
            int d1, d2;
            d1 = Math.DivRem(bytes[i], 16, out d2);
            digits[2 * i] = _hexDigits[d1];
            digits[2 * i + 1] = _hexDigits[d2];
        }
        return new string(digits);
    }

It's about 2.5 times faster that BitConverter.ToString, and about 7 times faster that BitConverter.ToString + removal of the '-' chars.

  • 4
    If performance mattered, you would not use Math.DivRem to split a byte into two nibbles. – dolmen Aug 20 '13 at 23:53
  • @dolmen, did you run performance tests with and without Math.DivRem? I seriously doubt it has any effect on performance: The implementation of Math.DivRem is exactly what you would do manually, and the method is very simple so it's always inlined by the JIT (actually it's intended to be inlined, as suggested by the TargetedPatchingOptOut attribute applied to it) – Thomas Levesque Aug 21 '13 at 0:12
  • 1
    @ThomasLevesque The implementation of DivRem performs a modulus operation and a division. Why do you assume that those operations are exactly what you would do manually? For me, the natural implementation is github.com/patridge/PerformanceStubs/blob/master/… which performs a bitshift and a logical and. Those operations are far cheaper than modulus and division even on modern processors. – Søren Boisen Aug 3 '16 at 16:08
0

This works to go from string to byte array...

public static byte[] StrToByteArray(string str)
    {
        Dictionary<string, byte> hexindex = new Dictionary<string, byte>();
        for (byte i = 0; i < 255; i++)
            hexindex.Add(i.ToString("X2"), i);

        List<byte> hexres = new List<byte>();
        for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i += 2)
            hexres.Add(hexindex[str.Substring(i, 2)]);

        return hexres.ToArray();
    }
0

I guess its speed is worth 16 extra bytes.

    static char[] hexes = new char[]{'0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','A','B','C','D','E','F'};
    public static string ToHexadecimal (this byte[] Bytes)
    {
        char[] Result = new char[Bytes.Length << 1];
        int Offset = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i != Bytes.Length; i++) {
            Result[Offset++] = hexes[Bytes[i] >> 4];
            Result[Offset++] = hexes[Bytes[i] & 0x0F];
        }
        return new string(Result);
    }
  • 2
    It's actually slower than other table lookup based approaches(at least in my tests). Using != instead of < breaks some JIT optimization patters, and the extra counter for Offset seems costly as well. – CodesInChaos Jan 15 '13 at 9:32
0

The following expands the excellent answer here by allowing native lower case option as well, and also handles null or empty input and makes this an extension method.

    /// <summary>
    /// Converts the byte array to a hex string very fast. Excellent job
    /// with code lightly adapted from 'community wiki' here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/14333437/264031
    /// (the function was originally named: ByteToHexBitFiddle). Now allows a native lowerCase option
    /// to be input and allows null or empty inputs (null returns null, empty returns empty).
    /// </summary>
    public static string ToHexString(this byte[] bytes, bool lowerCase = false)
    {
        if (bytes == null)
            return null;
        else if (bytes.Length == 0)
            return "";

        char[] c = new char[bytes.Length * 2];

        int b;
        int xAddToAlpha = lowerCase ? 87 : 55;
        int xAddToDigit = lowerCase ? -39 : -7;

        for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++) {

            b = bytes[i] >> 4;
            c[i * 2] = (char)(xAddToAlpha + b + (((b - 10) >> 31) & xAddToDigit));

            b = bytes[i] & 0xF;
            c[i * 2 + 1] = (char)(xAddToAlpha + b + (((b - 10) >> 31) & xAddToDigit));
        }

        string val = new string(c);
        return val;
    }

    public static string ToHexString(this IEnumerable<byte> bytes, bool lowerCase = false)
    {
        if (bytes == null)
            return null;
        byte[] arr = bytes.ToArray();
        return arr.ToHexString(lowerCase);
    }
0
static string ByteArrayToHexViaLookupPerByte2(byte[] bytes)
{                
        var result3 = new uint[bytes.Length];
        for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
                result3[i] = _Lookup32[bytes[i]];
        var handle = GCHandle.Alloc(result3, GCHandleType.Pinned);
        try
        {
                var result = Marshal.PtrToStringUni(handle.AddrOfPinnedObject(), bytes.Length * 2);
                return result;
        }
        finally
        {
                handle.Free();
        }
}

This functions in my tests is always the second entry after the unsafe implementation.

Unfortunately, the test bench is not so reliable... if you run it multiple times the list got shuffled so much that who knows after the unsafe which is really the fastest! It doesn't take into a account pre-warming, jit compilation time, and GC performance hits. I would like to have rewritten it to have more information, but I didn't had really the time for it.

0

There is also XmlWriter.WriteBinHex (see the MSDN page). This is very useful if you need to put the hexadecimal string into an XML stream.

Here is a standalone method to see how it works:

    public static string ToBinHex(byte[] bytes)
    {
        XmlWriterSettings xmlWriterSettings = new XmlWriterSettings();
        xmlWriterSettings.ConformanceLevel = ConformanceLevel.Fragment;
        xmlWriterSettings.CheckCharacters = false;
        xmlWriterSettings.Encoding = ASCIIEncoding.ASCII;
        MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream();
        using (XmlWriter xmlWriter = XmlWriter.Create(memoryStream, xmlWriterSettings))
        {
            xmlWriter.WriteBinHex(bytes, 0, bytes.Length);
        }
        return Encoding.ASCII.GetString(memoryStream.ToArray());
    }
-1

If you want to get the "4x speed increase" reported by wcoenen, then if it's not obvious: replace hex.Substring(i, 2) with hex[i]+hex[i+1]

You could also take it a step further and get rid of the i+=2 by using i++ in both places.

-1

Basic Solution With Extension Support

public static class Utils
{
    public static byte[] ToBin(this string hex)
    {
        int NumberChars = hex.Length;
        byte[] bytes = new byte[NumberChars / 2];
        for (int i = 0; i < NumberChars; i += 2)
            bytes[i / 2] = Convert.ToByte(hex.Substring(i, 2), 16);
        return bytes;
    }
    public static string ToHex(this byte[] ba)
    {
        return  BitConverter.ToString(ba).Replace("-", "");
    }
}

And use this class like below

    byte[] arr1 = new byte[] { 1, 2, 3 };
    string hex1 = arr1.ToHex();
    byte[] arr2 = hex1.ToBin();
-4

I suspect the speed of this will knock the socks off most of the other tests...

Public Function BufToHex(ByVal buf() As Byte) As String
    Dim sB As New System.Text.StringBuilder
    For i As Integer = 0 To buf.Length - 1
        sB.Append(buf(i).ToString("x2"))
    Next i
    Return sB.ToString
End Function
  • 2
    What makes you think that? You create a new string object for every byte in the buffer, and you don't pre-size the string builder (which can lead to the buffer being resized multiple times on large arrays). – Brian Reichle Dec 2 '11 at 13:50
  • Plain English byte conversion :) – Behrooz Dec 16 '12 at 21:44

protected by Sheridan Feb 6 '15 at 10:03

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