32

I am in a need of fast integer square root that does not involve any explicit division. The target RISC architecture can do operations like add, mul, sub, shift in one cycle (well - the operation's result is written in third cycle, really - but there's interleaving), so any Integer algorithm that uses these ops and is fast would be very appreciated.

This is what I have right now and I'm thinking that a binary search should be faster, since the following loop executes 16 times every single time (regardless of the value). I haven't debugged it extensively yet (but soon), so perhaps it's possible to have an early exit there:

unsigned short int int_sqrt32(unsigned int x)
{
    unsigned short int res=0;
    unsigned short int add= 0x8000;   
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<16;i++)
    {
        unsigned short int temp=res | add;
        unsigned int g2=temp*temp;      
        if (x>=g2)
        {
            res=temp;           
        }
        add>>=1;
    }
    return res;
}

Looks like the current performance cost of the above [in the context of the target RISC] is a loop of 5 instructions (bitset, mul, compare, store, shift). Probably no space in cache to unroll fully (but this will be the prime candidate for a partial unroll [e.g. A loop of 4 rather than 16], for sure). So, the cost is 16*5 = 80 instructions (plus loop overhead, if not unrolled). Which, if fully interleaved, would cost only 80 (+2 for last instruction) cycles.

Can I get some other sqrt implementation (using only add, mul, bitshift, store/cmp) under 82 cycles?

FAQ:

  • Why don't you rely on the compiler to produce a good fast code?

    There is no working C → RISC compiler for the platform. I will be porting the current reference C code into hand-written RISC ASM.

  • Did you profile the code to see if sqrt is actually a bottleneck?

    No, there is no need for that. The target RISC chip is about twenty MHz, so every single instruction counts. The core loop (calculating the energy transfer form factor between the shooter and receiver patch), where this sqrt is used, will be run ~1,000 times each rendering frame (assuming it will be fast enough, of course), up to 60,000 per second, and roughly 1,000,000 times for whole demo.

  • Have you tried to optimize the algorithm to perhaps remove the sqrt?

    Yes, I did that already. In fact, I got rid of 2 sqrts already and lots of divisions (removed or replaced by shifting). I can see a huge performance boost (compared to the reference float version) even on my gigahertz notebook.

  • What is the application?

    It's a real-time progressive-refinement radiosity renderer for the compo demo. The idea is to have one shooting cycle each frame, so it would visibly converge and look better with each rendered frame (e.g. Up 60-times per second, though the SW rasterizer won't probably be that fast [but at least it can run on the other chip in parallel with the RISC - so if it takes 2-3 frames to render the scene, the RISC will have worked through 2-3 frames of radiosity data, in parallel]).

  • Why don't you work directly in target ASM?

    Because radiosity is a slightly involved algorithm and I need the instant edit & continue debugging capability of Visual Studio. What I've done over the weekend in VS (couple hundred code changes to convert the floating-point math to integer-only) would take me 6 months on the target platform with only printing debugging".

  • Why can't you use a division?

    Because it's 16-times slower on the target RISC than any of the following: mul, add, sub, shift, compare, load/store (which take just 1 cycle). So, it's used only when absolutely required (a couple times already, unfortunately, when shifting could not be used).

  • Can you use look-up tables?

    The engine needs other LUTs already and copying from main RAM to RISC's little cache is prohibitively expensive (and definitely not each and every frame). But, I could perhaps spare 128-256 Bytes if it gave me at least a 100-200% boost for sqrt.

  • What's the range of the values for sqrt?

    I managed to reduce it to mere unsigned 32-bit int (4,294,967,295)

20
  • 4
    If your target is ARM or ARM-like you might want to have a look at finesse.demon.co.uk/steven/sqrt.html for ideas - I'm pretty sure when I used to program ARM in hand written assembly (a long while ago) there was an example of how to do this (along with divide) in the Archimedes manual. I would doubt binary search is faster than Newton Raphson or similar.
    – abligh
    Jun 29 '15 at 13:57
  • 1
    A long time ago in a galaxy far away when I was coding silly intros for 80386, I used the Newton algorithm. It still requires division but if you choose a smart starting value, not too many.
    – biziclop
    Jun 29 '15 at 14:07
  • 1
    if you have acess to floats.. how about a simple aproximation en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
    – CaldasGSM
    Jun 29 '15 at 14:20
  • 1
    I'm going out on a limb there but what is the distribution of your numbers? If many of them are small, maybe it's worth counting how many bits the result will have first and only run the loop that many iterations. (Of course this only applies if you've got clz or something similar as a 1 cycle instruction.)
    – biziclop
    Jun 29 '15 at 15:04
  • 4
    Am I the only one to wonder why the answers come before the questions in the FAQ?
    – abligh
    Jun 29 '15 at 16:19
8

Have a look here.

For instance, at 3(a) there is this method, which is trivially adaptable to do a 64->32 bit square root, and also trivially transcribable to assembler:

/* by Jim Ulery */
static unsigned julery_isqrt(unsigned long val) {
    unsigned long temp, g=0, b = 0x8000, bshft = 15;
    do {
        if (val >= (temp = (((g << 1) + b)<<bshft--))) {
           g += b;
           val -= temp;
        }
    } while (b >>= 1);
    return g;
}

No divisions, no multiplications, bit shifts only. However, the time taken will be somewhat unpredictable particularly if you use a branch (on ARM RISC conditional instructions would work).

In general, this page lists ways to calculate square roots. If you happen to want to produce a fast inverse square root (i.e. x**(-0.5) ), or are just interested in amazing ways to optimise code, take a look at this, this and this.

17
  • I'm still trying to find something I am trying to remember which was a fantastic estimation of a square root in a few instructions that was used on very early games.
    – abligh
    Jun 29 '15 at 16:12
  • Found it, but it's inverse square roots. Link added for amusement value.
    – abligh
    Jun 29 '15 at 16:18
  • Your code seems almost identical to mine. Except it's reorganized a bit (a while loop instead of for) and it looks like it has at one additional operation per loop. But there's too much on one line. Remember - I am going to convert to ASM, so no compiler magic (or avoiding the temporaries) will help. As for the inverse sq.root - yes - I'm aware of the trick popularized by Quake3, but it's of no use for integer math.
    – 3D Coder
    Jun 29 '15 at 17:41
  • However, your first link provides a method (section 3c) with a small LUT which has the potential to spend much less total time across all square roots (due to early exits). That is very intriguing ! I can modify it to keep increasing some global variable named TotalOps (after each cmp/add/bitshift operation), and see the grand total after I process the test dataset. True, it could, on average spend more time than 80 ops, but we won't know until I actually benchmark it. I just might get lucky ! Remember - only the total number of ops (which equal to RISC ASM instructions) is what matters.
    – 3D Coder
    Jun 29 '15 at 17:47
  • 1
    @abligh Oh, this failed console is long dead and buried. no question about that :-) I do, however, like to take a challenge with a fixed HW and it's my childhood favourite brand, so I'm curious how far I can push it in 3D.
    – 3D Coder
    Jul 1 '15 at 16:54
6

This is the same as yours, but with fewer ops. (I count 9 ops in the loop in your code, including test and increment i in the for loop and 3 assignments, but perhaps some of those disappear when coded in ASM? There are 6 ops in the code below, if you count g*g>n as two (no assignment)).

int isqrt(int n) {
  int g = 0x8000;
  int c = 0x8000;
  for (;;) {
    if (g*g > n) {
      g ^= c;
    }
    c >>= 1;
    if (c == 0) {
      return g;
    }
    g |= c;
  }
}

I got it here. You can maybe eliminate a comparison if you unroll the loop and jump to the appropriate spot based on the highest non-zero bit in the input.

Update

I've been thinking more about using Newton's method. In theory, the number of bits of accuracy should double for each iteration. That means Newton's method is much worse than any of the other suggestions when there are few correct bits in the answer; however, the situation changes where there are a lot of correct bits in the answer. Considering that most suggestions seem to take 4 cycles per bit, that means that one iteration of Newton's method (16 cycles for division + 1 for addition + 1 for shift = 18 cycles) is not worthwhile unless it gives over 4 bits.

So, my suggestion is to build up 8 bits of the answer by one of the suggested methods (8*4 = 32 cycles) then perform one iteration of Newton's method (18 cycles) to double the number of bits to 16. That's a total of 50 cycles (plus maybe an extra 4 cycles to get 9 bits before applying Newton's method, plus maybe 2 cycles to overcome the overshoot occasionally experienced by Newton's method). That's a maximum of 56 cycles which as far as I can see rivals any of the other suggestions.

Second Update

I coded the hybrid algorithm idea. Newton's method itself has no overhead; you just apply and double the number of significant digits. The issue is to have a predictable number of significant digits before you apply Newton's method. For that, we need to figure out where the most significant bit of the answer will appear. Using a modification of the fast DeBruijn sequence method given by another poster, we can perform that calculation in about 12 cycles in my estimation. On the other hand, knowing the position of the msb of the answer speeds up all methods (average, not worst case), so it seems worthwhile no matter what.

After calculating the msb of the answer, I run a number of rounds of the algorithm suggested above, then finish it off with one or two rounds of Newton's method. We decide when to run Newton's method by the following calculation: one bit of the answer takes about 8 cycles according to calculation in the comments; one round of Newton's method takes about 18 cycles (division, addition, and shift, and maybe assignment), so we should only run Newton's method if we're going to get at least three bits out of it. So for 6 bit answers, we can run the linear method 3 times to get 3 significant bits, then run Newton's method 1 time to get another 3. For 15 bit answers, we run the linear method 4 times to get 4 bits, then Newton's method twice to get another 4 then another 7. And so on.

Those calculations depend on knowing exactly how many cycles are required to get a bit by the linear method vs. how many are required by Newton's method. If the "economics" change, e.g., by discovering a faster way to build up bits in a linear fashion, the decision of when to invoke Newton's method will change.

I unrolled the loops and implemented the decisions as switches, which I hope will translate into fast table lookups in assembly. I'm not absolutely sure that I've got the minimum number of cycles in each case, so maybe further tuning is possible. E.g., for s=10, you can try to get 5 bits then apply Newton's method once instead of twice.

I've tested the algorithm thoroughly for correctness. Some additional minor speedups are possible if you're willing to accept slightly incorrect answers in some cases. At least two cycles are used after applying Newton's method to correct an off-by-one error that occurs with numbers of the form m^2-1. And a cycle is used testing for input 0 at the beginning, as the algorithm can't handle that input. If you know you're never going to take the square root of zero you can eliminate that test. Finally, if you only need 8 significant bits in the answer, you can drop one of the Newton's method calculations.

#include <inttypes.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <stdio.h>

uint32_t isqrt1(uint32_t n);

int main() {
  uint32_t n;
  bool it_works = true;
  for (n = 0; n < UINT32_MAX; ++n) {
    uint32_t sr = isqrt1(n);
    if ( sr*sr > n || ( sr < 65535 && (sr+1)*(sr+1) <= n )) {
      it_works = false;
      printf("isqrt(%" PRIu32 ") = %" PRIu32 "\n", n, sr);
    }
  }
  if (it_works) {
    printf("it works\n");
  }
  return 0;
}

/* table modified to return shift s to move 1 to msb of square root of x */
/*
static const uint8_t debruijn32[32] = {
    0, 31, 9, 30, 3,  8, 13, 29,  2,  5,  7, 21, 12, 24, 28, 19,
    1, 10, 4, 14, 6, 22, 25, 20, 11, 15, 23, 26, 16, 27, 17, 18
};
*/

static const uint8_t debruijn32[32] = {
  15,  0, 11, 0, 14, 11, 9, 1, 14, 13, 12, 5, 9, 3, 1, 6,
  15, 10, 13, 8, 12,  4, 3, 5, 10,  8,  4, 2, 7, 2, 7, 6
};

/* based on CLZ emulation for non-zero arguments, from
 * http://stackoverflow.com/questions/23856596/counting-leading-zeros-in-a-32-bit-unsigned-integer-with-best-algorithm-in-c-pro
 */
uint8_t shift_for_msb_of_sqrt(uint32_t x) {
  x |= x >>  1;
  x |= x >>  2;
  x |= x >>  4;
  x |= x >>  8;
  x |= x >> 16;
  x++;
  return debruijn32 [x * 0x076be629 >> 27];
}

uint32_t isqrt1(uint32_t n) {
  if (n==0) return 0;

  uint32_t s = shift_for_msb_of_sqrt(n);
  uint32_t c = 1 << s;
  uint32_t g = c;

  switch (s) {
  case 9:
  case 5:
    if (g*g > n) {
      g ^= c;
    }
    c >>= 1;
    g |= c;
  case 15:
  case 14:
  case 13:
  case 8:
  case 7:
  case 4:
    if (g*g > n) {
      g ^= c;
    }
    c >>= 1;
    g |= c;
  case 12:
  case 11:
  case 10:
  case 6:
  case 3:
    if (g*g > n) {
      g ^= c;
    }
    c >>= 1;
    g |= c;
  case 2:
    if (g*g > n) {
      g ^= c;
    }
    c >>= 1;
    g |= c;
  case 1:
    if (g*g > n) {
      g ^= c;
    }
    c >>= 1;
    g |= c;
  case 0:
    if (g*g > n) {
      g ^= c;
    }
  }

  /* now apply one or two rounds of Newton's method */
  switch (s) {
  case 15:
  case 14:
  case 13:
  case 12:
  case 11:
  case 10:
    g = (g + n/g) >> 1;
  case 9:
  case 8:
  case 7:
  case 6:
    g = (g + n/g) >> 1;
  }

  /* correct potential error at m^2-1 for Newton's method */
  return (g==65536 || g*g>n) ? g-1 : g;
}

In light testing on my machine (which admittedly is nothing like yours), the new isqrt1 routine runs about 40% faster on average than the previous isqrt routine I gave.

4
  • Interesting idea. I'm just unsure what would be the overhead of mixing two different methods. You seem to assume there would be zero overhead to mix them ? Not a single operation ?
    – 3D Coder
    Jul 1 '15 at 12:10
  • 1
    I'm going over your code right now. You did not explicitly write the assignments in C (the language allows you to chain multiple temporaries), but you can't avoid them in ASM. Each ASM instruction takes 2 operands-Some can take the 3rd-a small constant (range 0-16). So, your first line if (gg > n)* is actually 3 ops : assign,mul,compare. Next line is 1 op, then 1 op Then condition, which could actually be removed from ASM, as bitshift will set the Z-flag, so I'd just do a single-op jump (to a label with rts), then 1 op for logical or and finally 1 op for loop (jump to @LoopStart). That's 8
    – 3D Coder
    Jul 1 '15 at 12:28
  • 1
    Now if I apply the same rules to my initial method, then 1st line takes 2 ops, 2nd line 2 ops, 3rd line 1 op, 4th line 1 op, 5th line 1 op, and loop overhead 2 ops (decrement loop register, jump on Z). Total:9 ops. So, it looks like you shaved off 1 op, which is cool ! Thanks ! Of course, if we're down to that level, we must count each comparison as 2 ops (compare, jump), so that raises the total instruction count for both solutions. It looks like you combined loop counter with the sqrt logic, which is neat in ASM as we can avoid the condition if (c==0) altogether by jumping on Z-flag.
    – 3D Coder
    Jul 1 '15 at 12:39
  • 1
    If you want isqrt to be exact, Newton's method itself has an overhead of two ops at the end to correct a potential off-by-one error. However, you have to start non-Newton part at the right place, otherwise for small numbers it will generate leading zeros instead of significant bits. That means you need a CLZ or similar instruction. The bonus is that once you know how many bits are in the answer, you can use that information to adjust the number of ops, halving the number of steps on average. I'm working on an implementation ... everything done except the CLZ simulation. Jul 2 '15 at 1:05
4

If multiplication is the same speed (or faster than!) addition and shifting, or if you lack a fast shift-by-amount-contained-in-a-register instruction, then the following will not be helpful. Otherwise:

You're computing temp*temp afresh on each loop cycle, but temp = res | add, which is the same as res + add since their bits don't overlap, and (a) you have already computed res*res on a previous loop cycle, and (b) add has special structure (it's always just a single bit). So, using the fact that (a+b)^2 = a^2 + 2ab + b^2, and you already have a^2, and b^2 is just a single bit shifted twice as far to the left as the single-bit b, and 2ab is just a left-shifted by 1 more position than the location of the single bit in b, you can get rid of the multiplication:

unsigned short int int_sqrt32(unsigned int x)
{
    unsigned short int res = 0;
    unsigned int res2 = 0;
    unsigned short int add = 0x8000;   
    unsigned int add2 = 0x80000000;   
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < 16; i++)
    {
        unsigned int g2 = res2 + (res << i) + add2;
        if (x >= g2)
        {
            res |= add;
            res2 = g2;
        }
        add >>= 1;
        add2 >>= 2;
    }
    return res;
}

Also I would guess that it's a better idea to use the same type (unsigned int) for all variables, since according to the C standard, all arithmetic requires promotion (conversion) of narrower integer types to the widest type involved before the arithmetic operation is performed, followed by subsequent back-conversion if necessary. (This may of course be optimised away by a sufficiently intelligent compiler, but why take the risk?)

5
  • Since OP will manually port the code to ASM, the last paragraph is probably not critical.
    – biziclop
    Jun 29 '15 at 15:07
  • 1
    @j_random_hacker Yes, the multiplication on the RISC is also a single-cycle instruction (see the first sentence in my post), but thanks for the idea, since it sparked a different one that I am going to try. Also, some time later down the road, I am planning to have one additional implementation running just on the Motorola 68000 CPU (without any RISCs), . where mult. is expensive and division super-expensive. So, having the version that does not involve either of them is going to be very important ! For the RISC, though, this version has 16*8 operations, which is more than I have right now.
    – 3D Coder
    Jun 29 '15 at 16:20
  • 2
    @3DCoder For an implementation of integer square root on the M68k, you may want to check out this paper: K. C. Johnson, "ALGORITHM 650: Efficient Square Root Implementation on the 68000", ACM TOMS 13 (1987) 138-151. The program code for the paper is available from netlib
    – njuffa
    Jul 1 '15 at 2:52
  • I just checked this link and it's quite amazing, I must say ! I am soon going to try to compile the C code against the 68000, but will be replacing the most expensive routines (e.g. sqrt) with some hand-optimized ASM. So this link will come in handy very soon. Thanks a lot !
    – 3D Coder
    Jul 7 '15 at 12:16
  • 1
    Heh looks like this is the same as mine How to get a square root for 32 bit input in one clock cycle only?
    – Spektre
    Jun 23 '19 at 8:56
3

From the comment trail, it seems that the RISC processor only provides 32x32->32 bit multiplication and 16x16->32 bit multiplication. A 32x-32->64 bit widening multiply, or a MULHI instruction returning the upper 32 bits of a 64-bit product is not provided.

This would seem to exclude approaches based on Newton-Raphson iteration, which would likely be inefficient, as they typically require either MULHI instruction or widening multiply for the intermediate fixed-point arithmetic.

The C99 code below uses a different iterative approach that requires only 16x16->32 bit multiplies, but converges somewhat linearly, requiring up to six iterations. This approach requires CLZ functionality to quickly determine a starting guess for the iterations. Asker stated in the comments that the RISC processor used does not provide CLZ functionality. So emulation of CLZ is required, and since the emulation adds to both storage and instruction count, this may make this approach uncompetitive. I performed a brute-force search to determine the deBruijn lookup table with the smallest multiplier.

This iterative algorithm delivers raw results quite close to the desired results, i.e. (int)sqrt(x), but always somewhat on the high side due to the truncating nature of integer arithmetic. To arrive at the final result, the result is conditionally decremented until the square of the result is less than or equal to the original argument.

The use of the volatile qualifier in the code only serves to establish that all named variables can in fact be allocated as 16-bit data without impacting the functionality. I do not know whether this provides any advantage, but noticed that the OP specifically used 16-bit variables in their code. For production code, volatile should be removed.

Note that for most processors, the correction steps at the end should not involve any branching. The product y*y can be subtracted from x with carry-out (or borrow-out), then y is corrected by a subtract with carry-in (or borrow-in). So each step should be a sequence MUL, SUBcc, SUBC.

Because implementation of the iteration by a loop incurs substantial overhead, I have elected to completely unroll the loop, but provide two early-out checks. Tallying the operations manually I count 46 operations for the fastest case, 54 operations for the average case, and 60 operations for the worst case.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <math.h>

static const uint8_t clz_tab[32] = {
    31, 22, 30, 21, 18, 10, 29,  2, 20, 17, 15, 13, 9,  6, 28, 1,
    23, 19, 11,  3, 16, 14,  7, 24, 12,  4,  8, 25, 5, 26, 27, 0};

uint8_t clz (uint32_t a)
{
    a |= a >> 16;
    a |= a >> 8;
    a |= a >> 4;
    a |= a >> 2;
    a |= a >> 1;
    return clz_tab [0x07c4acdd * a >> 27];
}
  
/* 16 x 16 -> 32 bit unsigned multiplication; should be single instruction */
uint32_t umul16w (uint16_t a, uint16_t b)
{
    return (uint32_t)a * b;
}

/* Reza Hashemian, "Square Rooting Algorithms for Integer and Floating-Point
   Numbers", IEEE Transactions on Computers, Vol. 39, No. 8, Aug. 1990, p. 1025
*/
uint16_t isqrt (uint32_t x)
{
    volatile uint16_t y, z, lsb, mpo, mmo, lz, t;

    if (x == 0) return x; // early out, code below can't handle zero

    lz = clz (x);         // #leading zeros, 32-lz = #bits of argument
    lsb = lz & 1;
    mpo = 17 - (lz >> 1); // m+1, result has roughly half the #bits of argument
    mmo = mpo - 2;        // m-1
    t = 1 << mmo;         // power of two for two's complement of initial guess
    y = t - (x >> (mpo - lsb)); // initial guess for sqrt
    t = t + t;            // power of two for two's complement of result
    z = y;

    y = (umul16w (y, y) >> mpo) + z;
    y = (umul16w (y, y) >> mpo) + z;
    if (x >= 0x40400) {
        y = (umul16w (y, y) >> mpo) + z;
        y = (umul16w (y, y) >> mpo) + z;
        if (x >= 0x1002000) {
            y = (umul16w (y, y) >> mpo) + z;
            y = (umul16w (y, y) >> mpo) + z;
        }
    }

    y = t - y; // raw result is 2's complement of iterated solution
    y = y - umul16w (lsb, (umul16w (y, 19195) >> 16)); // mult. by sqrt(0.5) 

    if ((int32_t)(x - umul16w (y, y)) < 0) y--; // iteration may overestimate 
    if ((int32_t)(x - umul16w (y, y)) < 0) y--; // result, adjust downward if 
    if ((int32_t)(x - umul16w (y, y)) < 0) y--; // necessary 

    return y; // (int)sqrt(x)
}

int main (void)
{
    uint32_t x = 0;
    uint16_t res, ref;

    do {
        ref = (uint16_t)sqrt((double)x);
        res = isqrt (x);
        if (res != ref) {
            printf ("!!!! x=%08x  res=%08x  ref=%08x\n", x, res, ref);
            return EXIT_FAILURE;
        }
        x++;
    } while (x);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Another possibility is to use the Newton iteration for the square root, despite the high cost of division. For small inputs only one iteration will be required. Although the asker did not state this, based on the execution time of 16 cycles for the DIV operation I strongly suspect that this is actually a 32/16->16 bit division which requires additional guard code to avoid overflow, defined as a quotient that does not fit into 16 bits. I have added appropriate safeguards to my code based on this assumption.

Since the Newton iteration doubles the number of good bits each time it is applied, we only need a low-precision initial guess which can easily be retrieved from a table based on the five leading bits of the argument. In order to grab these, we first normalize the argument into 2.30 fixed-point format with an additional implicit scale factor of 232-(lz & ~1) where lz are the number of leading zeros in the argument. As in the previous approach the iteration doesn't always deliver an accurate result, so a correction must be applied should the preliminary result be too big. I count 49 cycles for the fast path, 70 cycles for the slow path (average 60 cycles).

static const uint16_t sqrt_tab[32] = 
{ 0x0000, 0x0000, 0x0000, 0x0000, 0x0000, 0x0000, 0x0000, 0x0000,
  0x85ff, 0x8cff, 0x94ff, 0x9aff, 0xa1ff, 0xa7ff, 0xadff, 0xb3ff,
  0xb9ff, 0xbeff, 0xc4ff, 0xc9ff, 0xceff, 0xd3ff, 0xd8ff, 0xdcff, 
  0xe1ff, 0xe6ff, 0xeaff, 0xeeff, 0xf3ff, 0xf7ff, 0xfbff, 0xffff
};

/* 32/16->16 bit division. Note: Will overflow if x[31:16] >= y */
uint16_t udiv_32_16 (uint32_t x, uint16_t y)
{
    uint16_t r = x / y;
    return r;
}

/* table lookup for initial guess followed by division-based Newton iteration*/ 
uint16_t isqrt (uint32_t x)
{
    volatile uint16_t q, lz, y, i, xh;

    if (x == 0) return x; // early out, code below can't handle zero

    // initial guess based on leading 5 bits of argument normalized to 2.30
    lz = clz (x);
    i = ((x << (lz & ~1)) >> 27);
    y = sqrt_tab[i] >> (lz >> 1);
    xh = (x >> 16); // needed for overflow check on division

    // first Newton iteration, guard against overflow in division
    q = 0xffff;
    if (xh < y) q = udiv_32_16 (x, y);
    y = (q + y) >> 1;
    if (lz < 10) {
        // second Newton iteration, guard against overflow in division
        q = 0xffff;
        if (xh < y) q = udiv_32_16 (x, y);
        y = (q + y) >> 1;
    }

    if (umul16w (y, y) > x) y--; // adjust quotient if too large

    return y; // (int)sqrt(x)
}
19
  • 1
    I think the CLZ emulation is a good idea. I've used it in my code as well. However, note that you can save a few cycles by modifing the table instead of performing arithmetic on clz(n) (see my answer). Since your initial guess is complicated, you might want to calculate x * 0x076be629 >> 27 and then look up values for both m and initial guess with two different tables replacing the clz table. Jul 2 '15 at 2:33
  • 1
    @EdwardDoolittle I realized of course that a couple instructions worth of computation could be pulled back into the table, but wanted to keep my answer sufficiently generic, since this approach should be useful for all platforms with very fast multiplies but in particular those that offer a CLZ-type instruction. The initial guess is not actually complicated, at least not conceptually: it is basically a 1-bit prepended to the right-shifted argument, at the appropriate bit position. There may be a more elegant way of accomplishing the same functionality, but I haven't found it yet.
    – njuffa
    Jul 2 '15 at 6:14
  • 1
    Back to the drawing board. Yesterday I noticed that the LUT solution (that I praised so much) actually has 2 divisions - it has 2 iterations of Newton at the end. I have no idea how I could have missed that when I was adding the 'benchmarking' code around it, it must have been zoomed out too much and it must have looked like it's a logical OR. double facepalm.. So, instead of 18 ops, it's 16 ops plus 2*16=32 cycles for division. Now I gotta go over all replies here and recheck if one of them isn't an improvement over this, as with 32 additional cycles, it's indeed very probable.My apologies.
    – 3D Coder
    Jul 7 '15 at 12:08
  • 1
    I have implemented the above-mentioned sqrt approximation and did indeed reduce the need to compute full-precision sqrt to 3%. 97% of data gets by with a 6-op approximation. While in 80% of cases the error is under 5% (e.g. not really noticeable, visually), in 20% of cases it goes above 100%. I know when that happens, so I would just change the sqrt algorithm on a wall-by-wall basis. I'll see if I can come up with a cleaner, non-hybrid solution.
    – 3D Coder
    Jul 12 '15 at 16:38
  • 1
    Not just the multiplier changed. The previous CLZ emulation had an increment just prior to multiplication to ensure that one factor in the multiplication was a power of two. I first searched for the smallest multiplier for that variant, which is 0x04653adf. I then figured I should check what happens if I remove the increment, which saves one integer ADD. For that variant, the smallest multiplier is 0x07c4acdd. I tried to find magic multipliers with only few 1-bits, but all multipliers that work have a population count of 16, so that turned out to be pretty much "mission impossible".
    – njuffa
    Jul 19 '15 at 10:43
1

Here is a less incremental version of the technique @j_random_hacker described. On at least one processor it was just a bit faster when I fiddled with this a couple of years ago. I have no idea why.

// assumes unsigned is 32 bits
unsigned isqrt1(unsigned x) {
  unsigned r = 0, r2 = 0; 
  for (int p = 15; p >= 0; --p) {
    unsigned tr2 = r2 + (r << (p + 1)) + (1u << (p + p));
    if (tr2 <= x) {
      r2 = tr2;
      r |= (1u << p);
    }
  }
  return r;
}

/*
gcc 6.3 -O2
isqrt(unsigned int):
        mov     esi, 15
        xor     r9d, r9d
        xor     eax, eax
        mov     r8d, 1
.L3:
        lea     ecx, [rsi+1]
        mov     edx, eax
        mov     r10d, r8d
        sal     edx, cl
        lea     ecx, [rsi+rsi]
        sal     r10d, cl
        add     edx, r10d
        add     edx, r9d
        cmp     edx, edi
        ja      .L2
        mov     r11d, r8d
        mov     ecx, esi
        mov     r9d, edx
        sal     r11d, cl
        or      eax, r11d
.L2:
        sub     esi, 1
        cmp     esi, -1
        jne     .L3
        rep ret
*/

If you turn up gcc 9 x86 optimization, it completely unrolls the loop and folds constants. The result is still only about 100 instructions.

-1

I don't know how to turn it into an efficient algorithm but when I investigated this in the '80s an interesting pattern emerged. When rounding square roots, there are two more integers with that square root than the preceding one (after zero).

So, one number (zero) has a square root of zero, two have a square root of 1 (1 and 2), 4 have a square root of two (3, 4, 5 and 6) and so on. Probably not a useful answer but interesting nonetheless.

1
  • If you round down, this is another way to view the fact that the sum of the first n odd numbers is n^2. If you just round, I'm not convinced it's true.
    – Teepeemm
    May 30 '16 at 20:00

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