23

I am trying to create sequences of number of 6 cases, but with 144 cases intervals.

Like this one for example

c(1:6, 144:149, 288:293)

1   2   3   4   5   6 144 145 146 147 148 149 288 289 290 291 292 293

How could I generate automatically such a sequence with

seq 

or with another function ?

0
26

I find the sequence function to be helpful in this case. If you had your data in a structure like this:

(info <- data.frame(start=c(1, 144, 288), len=c(6, 6, 6)))
#   start len
# 1     1   6
# 2   144   6
# 3   288   6

then you could do this in one line with:

sequence(info$len) + rep(info$start-1, info$len)
#  [1]   1   2   3   4   5   6 144 145 146 147 148 149 288 289 290 291 292 293

Note that this solution works even if the sequences you're combining are different lengths.

4
  • Yeah, given the abnormal intervals in the OP's example, storing the structure explicitly like that is probably a good idea. – Frank Jun 29 '15 at 16:59
  • 1
    From the ? page, "Note that sequence <- function(nvec) unlist(lapply(nvec, seq_len)) and it mainly exists in reverence to the very early history of R." Sort of like Frank's answer. – Carl Witthoft Jun 29 '15 at 18:40
  • @josilber - I still have to fill manually the c(1, 144, 288) ? what if I want 10 sequences or 100 sequences of 6 digits ? What would be your solution ? thanks – giac Jun 30 '15 at 6:58
  • 2
    @giacomoV if there is no pattern to the starting points and lengths, then yes of course you will need to specify them manually. If there is a pattern to the starting points and lengths then it will be easier. For instance if you wanted 100 sequences of length 6 with the starting points increasing by 144 each time starting at 0 you would use info <- data.frame(start=seq(0, by=144, length.out=100), len=6). – josliber Jun 30 '15 at 14:39
6

Here's one approach:

unlist(lapply(c(0L,(1:2)*144L-1L),`+`,seq_len(6)))
# or...
unlist(lapply(c(1L,(1:2)*144L),function(x)seq(x,x+5)))

Here's a way I like a little better:

rep(c(0L,(1:2)*144L-1L),each=6) + seq_len(6)

Generalizing...

rlen  <- 6L
rgap  <- 144L
rnum  <- 3L

starters <- c(0L,seq_len(rnum-1L)*rgap-1L)

rep(starters, each=rlen) + seq_len(rlen)
# or...
unlist(lapply(starters+1L,function(x)seq(x,x+rlen-1L)))
12
  • I feel like there should be a more elegant solution to this problem, though. – Frank Jun 29 '15 at 16:16
  • unlist(lapply(...)) can be replaced with sapply – hedgedandlevered Jun 29 '15 at 16:21
  • @hedgedandlevered Yeah, I tried that too, but it gives a matrix... and if I do sapply with simplify=FALSE, I get back to the lapply result. Could do c(sapply(...)), I suppose – Frank Jun 29 '15 at 16:22
  • 2
    @MikeWise Yeah, seq_len is just a little faster, they say, though I doubt that matters in this application. Just habit. Also, for the "generalization", I'd have to write `:`(1,rlen) which is kind of awkward. – Frank Jun 29 '15 at 16:48
  • 2
    @giacomoV There's no rush to accept. I'm not crazy about my answer, so I'd just as well see you leave the question open for a day or two and see if something better is found. – Frank Jun 29 '15 at 16:56
5

This can also be done using seq or seq.int

x = c(1, 144, 288)
c(sapply(x, function(y) seq.int(y, length.out = 6)))

#[1]   1   2   3   4   5   6 144 145 146 147 148 149 288 289 290 291 292 293

As @Frank mentioned in the comments here is another way to achieve this using @josilber's data structure (This is useful particularly when there is a need of different sequence length for different intervals)

c(with(info, mapply(seq.int, start, length.out=len)))

#[1]   1   2   3   4   5   6 144 145 146 147 148 149 288 289 290 291 292 293
7
  • 1
    Yeah, this is good. I find it weird that I can't get the result in integers even if I switch to x = c(1L, 144L, 288L), though. I think this is a flaw in how seq treats length.out... seq.int seems to do the "right" thing, fortunately. – Frank Jun 29 '15 at 17:07
  • 2
    Yes, I know. The result of seq(1L,length.out=6) should be an integer vector is my point. I'm criticizing how the function works, not your answer (which seems the best so far to me). Your answer would work "better" (to my mind), though, if x were an integer and seq.int were used in place of seq so that the end result is an integer vector (like the OP's example). – Frank Jun 29 '15 at 17:14
  • You could expand the capability by defining a sublength <- c(6,6,6) and setting length.out=sublength , so that each sequence could be of a different length. – Carl Witthoft Jun 29 '15 at 18:38
  • 3
    @CarlWitthoft Unfortunately, seq/seq.int is not vectorised in the length.out argument. That just means mapply would be the way to go, though, instead of sapply. Using josilber's data structure, c(with(info, mapply(seq.int, start, length.out=len))) – Frank Jun 29 '15 at 20:14
  • 1
    @Frank seems like a matter of preference then :) – josliber Jun 30 '15 at 14:54
0

I am using R 3.3.2. OSX 10.9.4

I tried:

a<-c()  # stores expected sequence
f<-288  # starting number of final sub-sequence
it<-144 # interval
for (d in seq(0,f,by=it))
{
    if (d==0)
    {
        d=1
    }
    a<-c(a, seq(d,d+5))
    print(d)
}
print(a)

AND the expected sequence stores in a.

[1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 144 145 146 147 148 149 288 289 290 291 292 293

And another try:

a<-c()  # stores expected sequence
it<-144 # interval
lo<-4   # number of sub-sequences
for (d in seq(0,by=it, length.out = lo))
{
    if (d==0)
    {
        d=1
    }
    a<-c(a, seq(d,d+5))
    print(d)
}
print(a)

The result:

[1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 144 145 146 147 148 149 288 289 290 291 292 293 432 433 434 435 436 437

0

I tackled this with cumsum function

seq_n <- 3 # number of sequences
rep(1:6, seq_n) + rep(c(0, cumsum(rep(144, seq_n-1))-1), each = 6)
# [1]   1   2   3   4   5   6 144 145 146 147 148 149 288 289 290 291 292 293

No need to calculate starting values of sequences as in the @josilber's solution, but the length of a sequence has to be constant.

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