5

If I have a type like MyEnum<T>, how can I map it in cases where not every variant is parameterized?

For example, I'd like to convert from MyEnum<u32> to MyEnum<String>:

enum MyEnum<T> {
    B,
    C,
    D(T),
}

fn trans(a: MyEnum<u32>) -> MyEnum<String> {
    match a {
        MyEnum::D(i) => MyEnum::D(i.to_string()),
        other_cases => other_cases,
    }
}

fn main() {}

This fails with:

error[E0308]: match arms have incompatible types
  --> src/main.rs:8:9
   |
8  |         match a {
   |         ^ expected struct `std::string::String`, found u32
   |
   = note: expected type `MyEnum<std::string::String>`
   = note:    found type `MyEnum<u32>`
note: match arm with an incompatible type
  --> src/main.rs:10:28
   |
10 |             other_cases => other_cases,
   |                            ^^^^^^^^^^^

Instead of the other_cases => other_cases line, I tried this, also without success:

other_cases => {
    let o: MyEnum<String> = other_cases;
    o
}
  • 1
    MyEnum<u32> and MyEnum<String> are two different types, so their variants are not interchangable. – A.B. Jun 29 '15 at 21:06
2
macro_rules! partial_enum {
    ($name: ident, $some: ident, $($none: ident),+) => {
        #[derive(Debug)]
        enum $name<T> {
            $some(T),
            $($none),+
        }
        impl<T> $name<T> {
            fn convert<U>(self) -> Result<$name<U>, T> {
                match self {
                    $name::$some(x) => Err(x),
                    $($name::$none => Ok($name::$none)),+
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
partial_enum!(MyEnum, D, B, C);
fn trans(a: MyEnum<u32>) -> MyEnum<String> {
    let a_split: Result<MyEnum<String>, u32> = a.convert();
    match a_split {
        Ok(is_none) => is_none,
        Err(not_none) => MyEnum::D(not_none.to_string()),
    }
}
fn main() {
    println!("{:?}", trans(MyEnum::D(13)));
}
7

I'd create a map method on your enum:

#[derive(Debug)]
enum MyEnum<T> {
    B,
    C,
    D(T),
}

impl<T> MyEnum<T> {
    fn map<F, U>(self, f: F) -> MyEnum<U>
        where F: FnOnce(T) -> U
    {
        use MyEnum::*;

        match self {
            B => B,
            C => C,
            D(x) => D(f(x)),
        }
    }
}

fn main() {
    let answer = MyEnum::D(42);
    let answer2 = answer.map(|x| x.to_string());
    println!("{:?}", answer2);
}

This is similar to existing map methods, such as Option::map.

  • 1
    This should have been the accepted answer. – WiSaGaN Aug 14 '16 at 7:48
5

Well, this is actually an answer:

enum MyEnum<T> {
    B,
    C,
    D(T),
}

fn trans(a: MyEnum<u32>) -> MyEnum<String> {
    match a {
        MyEnum::D(i) => MyEnum::D(i.to_string()),
        MyEnum::B => MyEnum::B,
        MyEnum::C => MyEnum::C
    }
}

fn main() {
}

But repeating all variants isn't acceptable when there's a lot of them..

  • 1
    This is exactly what you need to do. For large cases, you may be able to form a macro that helps. – Chris Morgan Jun 29 '15 at 22:04
3

Some languages (like C++), use Duck Typing: if it quacks like a duck, it must be a duck, and therefore names matter. Rust does not.

In Rust, names are just some display utility for us mere humans, the B in MyEnum<u32> and MyEnum<String> may happen to have the same visual representation, but they are completely different syntactic entities as far as the language is concerned.


There are multiple ways to alleviate your pain, though:

  • a code generation plugin or build.rs script can be used as well
  • a macro can be used to automate the mapping
  • a manual mapping can be done, it's a one shot effort after all
  • the code can be restructured to separate type-dependent from type-independent variants

I'll show-case the latter:

enum MyEnumImpl {
    A,
    B,
    C,
}

enum MyEnum<T> {
    Independent(MyEnumImpl),
    Dependent(T),
}

Obviously, the latter makes it much easier to manually map things.

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