35

From my understanding the binary number system uses as set of two numbers, 0's and 1's to perform calculations.

Why does:

console.log(parseInt("11", 2)); return 3 and not 00001011? http://www.binaryhexconverter.com/decimal-to-binary-converter

2
  • 1
    @VikramK I believe I answered the why of the OP’s question and also included an additional how to for correctly doing it. What do you believe is missing?
    – Jason Cust
    Jun 25, 2018 at 3:25
  • 1
    @JasonCust Not sure, I checked answers again, made sense.I guess my bad, don't remember what I saw back then. Apologies. I'll pull down my comment.Thanks for notifying,mate.
    – Vikram K
    Jun 26, 2018 at 3:42

16 Answers 16

100

Use toString() instead of parseInt:

11..toString(2)
var str = "11";
var bin = (+str).toString(2);
console.log(bin)

According JavaScript's Documentation:

The following examples all return NaN:

parseInt("546", 2); // Digits are not valid for binary representations

3
  • 3
    Cool solution for my problem. new Number(str).toString(2) does the same, would be more explicit though. As an explanation: It's the Number's toString method, that accepts a radix and outputs the number in a different representation: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… - The + operator casts the string to a Number. Dec 29, 2017 at 13:02
  • 2
    For those who might be confused about .. versus ., check out the answers by kennebec and liuwenzhuang at stackoverflow.com/questions/4211037/…. When using an integer (e.g. 11..toString(2)), the first dot is actually a decimal point. Jan 30, 2019 at 21:57
  • Please note that when using this method, your binary strings may not be accurate if you exceed the Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER. For example, from the console of Chrome 87 on a Mac, Number.prototype.toString.call(38934893849895835, 2) gives a binary of 10001010010100110001010001100101010010100110001110011000. This is wrong given that the little-endian LSB should be 1 not 0 since the rightmost decimal value is 5 i.e. 5 % 2 = 1.
    – ObiHill
    Dec 24, 2020 at 6:10
36

parseInt(number, base) returns decimal value of a number presented by number parameter in base base.

And 11 is binary equivalent of 3 in decimal number system.

var a = {};

window.addEventListener('input', function(e){
  a[e.target.name] = e.target.value;
  console.clear();
  console.log(  parseInt(a.number, a.base)  );
}, false);
<input name='number' placeholder='number' value='1010'>
<input name='base' placeholder='base' size=3 value='2'>

2
  • 7
    i.e. 11 in binary is 3 in decimal. ;-)
    – RobG
    Jun 29, 2015 at 22:09
  • 2
    At first when I read the documentation the first line states: "function parses a string argument and returns an integer" not "returns decimal" It only states that further on down the documentation in the description. But thanks.
    – Robert
    Jun 29, 2015 at 22:16
15

As stated in the documentation for parseInt: The parseInt() function parses a string argument and returns an integer of the specified radix (the base in mathematical numeral systems).

So, it is doing exactly what it should do: converting a binary value of 11 to an integer value of 3.

If you are trying to convert an integer value of 11 to a binary value than you need to use the Number.toString method:

console.log(11..toString(2)); // 1011
5
  • 1
    Yes I understand it returns an integer. Hexas can be integers too as well as binary numbers and octal numbers, an integer is a whole number. What it should say at the top of the documentation is what can be found in the description section: "the returned value will be the decimal integer representation of the first argument taken as a number in the specified radix (base). "
    – Robert
    Jun 29, 2015 at 22:21
  • @RobertRocha, that is incorrect. An integer is only a subset of decimal values that can be represented in binary, octal, hex, etc.
    – Jason Cust
    Jun 29, 2015 at 22:26
  • You are right I just looked it up: dictionary.reference.com/browse/integer?s=t
    – Robert
    Jun 29, 2015 at 22:34
  • 2
    @RobertRocha no worries as it is an easy mistake :-) A quick question I ask myself when it comes to something like this is if I could be the first person to notice an error about some documentation. Which is quickly followed by quickly assessing how confident I am in my interpretation of it. Often times while proving to myself I am right I learn something new (and also that my previous understanding was inaccurate). :-)
    – Jason Cust
    Jun 29, 2015 at 22:38
  • Why you used two dots here and not the parentheses like in the documentation?
    – Suncatcher
    Aug 3, 2019 at 4:56
6

.toString(2) works when applied to a Number type.

255.toString(2)      // syntax error
"255".toString(2);   // 255

var n=255;
n.toString(2);      // 11111111

// or in short
Number(255).toString(2) // 11111111
// or use two dots so that the compiler does
// mistake with the decimal place as in 250.x
255..toString(2)        // 11111111
1
  • 3
    You need to wrap the primitive type with parenthesis to make it work: (255).toString(2)
    – Chang
    Aug 13, 2018 at 0:46
4

The parseInt() function parses a string argument and returns an integer of the specified radix (the base in mathematical numeral systems).

So you are telling the system you want to convert 11 as binary to an decimal.

Specifically to the website you are referring, if you look closer it is actually using JS to issue a HTTP GET to convert it on web server side. Something like following:

http://www.binaryhexconverter.com/hesapla.php?fonksiyon=dec2bin&deger=11&pad=false

2
  • 11 as binary is still an integer.
    – Robert
    Jun 29, 2015 at 22:18
  • sorry I mean decimal, changed
    – Simon Wang
    Jun 29, 2015 at 22:20
4

The shortes method I've found for converting a decimal string into a binary is:

const input = "54654";
const output = (input*1).toString(2);
print(output);

2

I think you should understand the math behind decimal to binary conversion. Here is the simple implementation in javascript.

main();

function main() {
    let input  = 12;
    let result = decimalToBinary(input);
    console.log(result);
}

function decimalToBinary(input) {
    let base           = 2;
    let inputNumber    = input;
    let quotient       = 0;
    let remainderArray = [];
    let resultArray    = [];

    if (inputNumber) {
        while (inputNumber) {
            quotient = parseInt(inputNumber / base);

            remainderArray.push(inputNumber % base);

            inputNumber = quotient;
        }
        for (let i = remainderArray.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
            resultArray.push(remainderArray[i]); 
        }
        return parseInt(resultArray.join(''));
    } else {
        return `${input} is not a valid input`;
    }
}

2

This is an old question, however I have another solution that might contribute a little bit. I usually use this function to convert a decimal number into a binary:

function dec2bin(dec) {
    return (dec >>> 0).toString(2);
}

The dec >>> 0 converts the number into a byte and then toString(radix) function is called to return a binary string. It is simple and clean.

Note: a radix is used for representing a numeric value. Must be an integer between 2 and 36. For example:

  • 2 - The number will show as a binary value
  • 8 - The number will show as an octal value
  • 16 - The number will show as an hexadecimal value
1
  • how does dec >>> 0 convert to byte?
    – karthick
    Mar 22, 2019 at 5:36
2

function num(n){
  return Number(n.toString(2));
}
console.log(num(5));

1

This worked for me: parseInt(Number, original_base).toString(final_base)

Eg: parseInt(32, 10).toString(2) for decimal to binary conversion.

Source: https://www.w3resource.com/javascript-exercises/javascript-math-exercise-3.php

1

Here is a concise recursive version of a manual decimal to binary algorithm:

  • Divide decimal number in half and aggregate remainder per operation until value==0 and print concatenated binary string
  • Example using 25: 25/2 = 12(r1)/2 = 6(r0)/2 = 3(r0)/2 = 1(r1)/2 = 0(r1) => 10011 => reverse => 11001

    function convertDecToBin(input){
        return Array.from(recursiveImpl(input)).reverse().join(""); //convert string to array to use prototype reverse method as bits read right to left 
    
        function recursiveImpl(quotient){
            const nextQuotient = Math.floor(quotient / 2); //divide subsequent quotient by 2 and take lower limit integer (if fractional)
            const remainder = ""+quotient % 2; //use modulus for remainder and convert to string
            return nextQuotient===0?remainder:remainder + recursiveImpl(nextQuotient); //if next quotient is evaluated to 0 then return the base case remainder else the remainder concatenated to value of next recursive call    
        }
    }
    
0

To get better understanding, I think you should try to do the math of that conversion by yourself.

  • (1) 11 / 2 = 5
  • (1) 5 / 2 = 2
  • (0) 2 / 2 = 1
  • (1) 1 / 2 = 0

I made a function based on that logic

function decimalToBinary(inputNum) {

    let binary = [];

    while (inputNum > 0) {

        if (inputNum % 2 === 1) {

            binary.splice(0,0,1);
            inputNum = (inputNum - 1) / 2;

        } else {

            binary.splice(0,0,0);
            inputNum /= 2;
        }
    }

    binary = binary.join('');
    console.log(binary);
}
0

This is what I did to get the solution:

    function addBinary(a,b) {
 // function that converts decimal to binary
 function dec2bin(dec) {
   return (dec >>> 0).toString(2);
 } 
 var sum = a+b; // add the two numbers together
 return sum.toString(2); //converts sum to binary
} 

addBinary(2, 3);

I first converted the decimal number to binary like it said, and I got the function from w3schools under the JavaScript Bitwise lesson. Then to make it easier on myself, I created the variable "sum" which does the addition and finally, I made the addBinary function return the sum as a binary code, then called it. It passed in CodeWars. I hope this makes sense and it helps you.

0

Just use Number(x).toString(base). Where base needs to be equals 2.

var num1=13;
Number(num1).toString(2)

result: "1101"

Number(11).toString(2)

result: "1011"

0

It seems like the conversion with the string radix (dec >>> 0).toString(2) is returning the binary number formatted in the wrong direction. I have validated this solution in Chrome. In case anyone wants to manually calculate binary for validation, from left to right you add the numbers together that correspond to a 1 position in your binary number mapping to [1][2][4][8][16][32][64][128] ....

For example:

  • 10 in binary is 0101 OR 0 + 2 + 0 + 8.
  • 13 in binary is 1011 OR 1 + 0 + 4 + 8.
  • 255 in binary is 11111111 OR 1 + 2 + 4 + 8 + 16 + 32 + 64 + 128
    function dec2bin(dec){
      return (dec >>> 0).toString(2).split('').reverse().join('');
    }
0

This will give the decimal to binary:

let num = "1234"
console.log(num.toString(2));

This will give binary to decimal:

let num = "10011010010";
console.log(parseInt(num, 2));

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