I am struggling on how to force SSL on my website (nginx). I would like to force a redirect from both "http://www.example.com" and "http://example.com" to "https://example.com" (without any www).

The code I wrote currently can catch "http://www.example.com" but does not catch "http://example.com", it seems to infinite loop a redirection. I'm pretty sure it has something to do with the "server_name". I tried swapping it up a down inside the "server { ... }" brackets and stuff but it still does not behave the way I would like it.

Here is my nginx conf

server {
    server_name     www.example.com;
    return 301      https://example.com$request_uri;
}

server {

    server_name     example.com;

    root            /var/www/example.com;
    index index.html index.php index.htm;

    location / {
        include         /etc/nginx/conf/fastcgi_params;
        fastcgi_pass    unix:/var/run/php5-fpm.sock;
        fastcgi_index   index.php;
        fastcgi_param   SCRIPT_FILENAME $document_root/$fastcgi_script_name;

    }

    location ~ /\.ht {
        deny            all;
    }

}


server {

    #listen 443 spdy default deferred;
    ssl                         on;
    ssl_certificate_key         /etc/myssl/www.example.com.key;
    ssl_certificate             /etc/myssl/www.example.com.chained.crt;
    ssl_protocols               TLSv1 TLSv1.1 TLSv1.2;
    ssl_ciphers                 'ECDHE-RSA-AES128-[...]';
    ssl_prefer_server_ciphers   on;
    ssl_dhparam                 /usr/share/myssl/dhparams/dh2048-group14.pem;
    ssl_session_timeout         5m;
    ssl_session_cache           shared:SSL:5m;
    add_header                  Strict-Transport-Security max-age=15768000;

}

You'll want to configure each of your server blocks to specifically listen to a certain port, such as the following:

server {
    listen          80; 
    server_name     www.example.com example.com;
    return 301      https://example.com$request_uri;
}

server {
    listen          443 ssl spdy; 
    server_name     www.example.com;
    ssl_certificate_key         /etc/myssl/www.example.com.key;
    ssl_certificate             /etc/myssl/www.example.com.chained.crt;
    [other ssl_* directives, as required]
    return 301      https://example.com$request_uri;
}

server {
    listen          443 ssl spdy; 
    server_name     example.com;
    ssl_certificate_key         /etc/myssl/www.example.com.key;
    ssl_certificate             /etc/myssl/www.example.com.chained.crt;
    [other ssl_* directives, as required]
    [remaining example.com configuration here]
}

This says listen on HTTP (port 80) for requests to http://www.example.com and http://example.com and redirect them to https://example.com. The second block listens for https://www.example.com and redirects to https://example.com. Then, the final block listens for SSL/SPDY requests to https://example.com.

Add your remaining HTTPS-only configuration to the second block, which looks to be essentially merging the second and third blocks.

The following is now demonstrated in the example: You will need to add another server block if you want your server to respond or redirect users accessing https://www.example.com & thus you may require a second valid SSL certificate (one for www.example.com and one for example.com). Alternatively, a wildcard certificate or a certificate with alternate DNS names would work for both circumstances.

Also ensure that no other conflicting configuration files are present in your configuration directory (eg /etc/nginx/conf.d or /etc/nginx/sites-enabled; depending on your platform).

Edited: expanded based on other information given.

  • Merging second and third block does not work at all, it triggers a redirection error for both http and https, with and without www. My SSL certificate is valid for both www and non-www. – David Zalmann Jun 30 '15 at 9:38
  • Try using my newly-adjusted example configuration as your starting point, and then building off that. Add your SSL configuration into each of the SSL blocks, and add your application configuration to the final, example.com block, which is where your users will end up being redirected. – davidjb Jul 1 '15 at 3:51
  • I'm afraid I tried that as well already (moving stuff from one server{} bracket to another, creating new brackets, etc). Your new config returns the following error, if by any chance it may hint: "nginx: [warn] conflicting server name "www.example.com" on 0.0.0.0:80, ignored nginx: [warn] conflicting server name "example.com" on 0.0.0.0:80, ignored". I'd like to precise I'm using php-fpm and cloudflare as well (for whatever it counts. I'm not sure it matters since it's working fine except that one single h.ttp://example.com not going https. tl;dr: still infinite redirection loop. – David Zalmann Jul 1 '15 at 4:56

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