107

I used maven to do the tutorial https://spring.io/guides/gs/uploading-files/
All the codes I used was copied.

The Application can run, but I get the error:

Whitelabel Error Page This application has no explicit mapping for /error, so you are seeing this as a fallback. Tue Jun 30 17:24:02 CST 2015 There was an unexpected error (type=Not Found, status=404). No message available

How can I fix it?

  • added your comment to the post - you can edit it by yourself. That better than commenting your own post – Alexander Jun 30 '15 at 9:32

42 Answers 42

137

Make sure that your main class is in a root package above other classes.

When you run a Spring Boot Application, (i.e. a class annotated with @SpringBootApplication), Spring will only scan the classes below your main class package.

com
   +- APP
         +- Application.java  <--- your main class should be here, above your controller classes
         |
         +- model
         |   +- user.java
         +- controller
             +- UserController.java
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Above or on the same level? – Martin Erlic Jan 31 '17 at 9:56
  • 21
    I spent almost 2hrs of my life on figuring this out! – Rakesh Feb 3 '17 at 12:15
  • 6
    Tried that too. Still error. At least the main page i.e., localhost:8080 should show me the Tomcat homepage, shouldn't it? But that too isn't showing – zulkarnain shah Jul 16 '17 at 6:27
  • Thanks for the hint. I used to be an Eclipse user and there this configuration was not needed, but now I'm using IntelliJ and it was very hopeful. – Armer B. Jan 12 '19 at 10:24
  • @zulkarnainshah The usual tomcat homepage is generated by a WAR that is not included here. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 25 '19 at 10:33
61

When we create a Spring boot application we annotate it with @SpringBootApplication annotation. This annotation 'wraps up' many other necessary annotations for the application to work. One such annotation is @ComponentScan annotation. This annotation tells Spring to look for Spring components and configure the application to run.

Your application class needs to be top of your package hierarchy, so that Spring can scan sub-packages and find out the other required components.

package com.test.spring.boot;
import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;

@SpringBootApplication
public class App {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(App.class, args);
    }
}

Below code snippet works as the controller package is under com.test.spring.boot package

package com.test.spring.boot.controller;

import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

@RestController
public class HomeController {

    @RequestMapping("/")
    public String home(){
        return "Hello World!";
    }
}

Below code snippet does NOT Work as the controller package is NOT under com.test.spring.boot package

package com.test.controller;

import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

@RestController
public class HomeController {

     @RequestMapping("/")
     public String home(){
         return "Hello World!";
     }
 }

From Spring Boot documentation:

Many Spring Boot developers always have their main class annotated with @Configuration, @EnableAutoConfiguration and @ComponentScan. Since these annotations are so frequently used together (especially if you follow the best practices above), Spring Boot provides a convenient @SpringBootApplication alternative.

The @SpringBootApplication annotation is equivalent to using @Configuration, @EnableAutoConfiguration and @ComponentScan with their default attributes

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Very nice explanation. Thank you – Lova Chittumuri Apr 21 '17 at 18:40
39

You can solve this by adding an ErrorController in your application. You can have the error controller return a view that you need.

Error Controller in my application looks like below:

import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.web.ErrorAttributes;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.web.ErrorController;
import org.springframework.http.HttpStatus;
import org.springframework.http.ResponseEntity;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Controller;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.ResponseBody;
import org.springframework.web.context.request.RequestAttributes;
import org.springframework.web.context.request.ServletRequestAttributes;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.ModelAndView;

import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
import java.util.Map;

/**
 * Basic Controller which is called for unhandled errors
 */
@Controller
public class AppErrorController implements ErrorController{

    /**
     * Error Attributes in the Application
     */
    private ErrorAttributes errorAttributes;

    private final static String ERROR_PATH = "/error";

    /**
     * Controller for the Error Controller
     * @param errorAttributes
     */
    public AppErrorController(ErrorAttributes errorAttributes) {
        this.errorAttributes = errorAttributes;
    }

    /**
     * Supports the HTML Error View
     * @param request
     * @return
     */
    @RequestMapping(value = ERROR_PATH, produces = "text/html")
    public ModelAndView errorHtml(HttpServletRequest request) {
        return new ModelAndView("/errors/error", getErrorAttributes(request, false));
    }

    /**
     * Supports other formats like JSON, XML
     * @param request
     * @return
     */
    @RequestMapping(value = ERROR_PATH)
    @ResponseBody
    public ResponseEntity<Map<String, Object>> error(HttpServletRequest request) {
        Map<String, Object> body = getErrorAttributes(request, getTraceParameter(request));
        HttpStatus status = getStatus(request);
        return new ResponseEntity<Map<String, Object>>(body, status);
    }

    /**
     * Returns the path of the error page.
     *
     * @return the error path
     */
    @Override
    public String getErrorPath() {
        return ERROR_PATH;
    }


    private boolean getTraceParameter(HttpServletRequest request) {
        String parameter = request.getParameter("trace");
        if (parameter == null) {
            return false;
        }
        return !"false".equals(parameter.toLowerCase());
    }

    private Map<String, Object> getErrorAttributes(HttpServletRequest request,
                                                   boolean includeStackTrace) {
        RequestAttributes requestAttributes = new ServletRequestAttributes(request);
        return this.errorAttributes.getErrorAttributes(requestAttributes,
                includeStackTrace);
    }

    private HttpStatus getStatus(HttpServletRequest request) {
        Integer statusCode = (Integer) request
                .getAttribute("javax.servlet.error.status_code");
        if (statusCode != null) {
            try {
                return HttpStatus.valueOf(statusCode);
            }
            catch (Exception ex) {
            }
        }
        return HttpStatus.INTERNAL_SERVER_ERROR;
    }
}

The above class is based on Springs BasicErrorController class.

You can instantiate the above ErrorController like this in a @Configuration file:

 @Autowired
 private ErrorAttributes errorAttributes;

 @Bean
 public AppErrorController appErrorController(){return new AppErrorController(errorAttributes);}

You can choose override the default ErrorAttributes by implementing ErrorAttributes. But in most cases the DefaultErrorAttributes should suffice.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Your link to the BasicErrorController class 404s. – Stephane Jun 17 '18 at 20:29
  • @owaism: The link for BasicErrorController is not good anymore, can you update ? – HDJEMAI Jun 25 '18 at 14:43
  • 1
    The link to BasicErrorController is fixed now. – axiopisty Aug 21 '18 at 14:46
14

In my case the controller class was annotated with @Controller. Changing that to @RestController resolved the problem. Basically @RestController is @Controller + @ResponseBody So either use @RestController , or @Controller with @ResponseBody annotation with each method.

Some useful notes here : https://www.genuitec.com/spring-frameworkrestcontroller-vs-controller/

| improve this answer | |
  • It works , but as per examples all over internet basic configuration should work with @Controller . Any body aware of this reason why only RestController working? – supernova Nov 16 '17 at 16:06
  • When annotating your class with @RestController it implicitly adds the @ResponseBody annotation, but if you're using the @Controller annotation, you must explicitly add this annotation yourself. – Robin Keskisarkka Feb 20 '19 at 14:08
10

in my case it because of package position , meaning package of controller must be above main class package

if my main class package is package co.companyname.spring.tutorial; any controller package should package co.companyname.spring.tutorial.WHAT_EVER_HERE;

package co.companyname.spring.tutorial; // package for main class
@SpringBootApplication
public class FirstProjectApplication {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(FirstProjectApplication.class, args);
    }
}


package co.companyname.spring.tutorial.controllers; // package for controllers 

import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

@RestController 
public class HelloController { 

@RequestMapping("/hello")  
public String hello() {   
 return "Hello, world"; 
 }}

after finish coding press boot dashboard

enter image description here

one last thing to make sure your controller is mapping or not just console you should see somehting smilliar

Mapped "{[/hello]}" onto public java.lang.String co.companyname.spring.tutorial.controllers.HelloController.hello()

happy coding

| improve this answer | |
9

This happens when an explicit error page is not defined. To define an error page, create a mapping of /error with a view. e.g. the below code maps to a string value being returned in case of an error.

package com.rumango.controller;

import org.springframework.boot.web.servlet.error.ErrorController;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Controller;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.ResponseBody;
@Controller
public class IndexController implements ErrorController{
    private final static String PATH = "/error";
    @Override
    @RequestMapping(PATH)
    @ResponseBody
    public String getErrorPath() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return "No Mapping Found";
    }

}
| improve this answer | |
  • Can you add some explanation to your code? Why does it solve the question, which are the crucial parts? – Nico Haase Nov 12 '18 at 9:50
  • There is one specific thing to note in this answer relative to Spring Boot that caused me a bit of a headache at first. It is important to implement springframework's ErrorController interface. If you create a controller endpoint mapped to "/error" without doing this you will get an error telling you that method is already mapped. – mmaynar1 Dec 7 '18 at 3:56
8

Try adding the dependency.

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-thymeleaf</artifactId>
</dependency>
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    what does this actually do though? – Stealth Rabbi Feb 18 '17 at 21:14
  • I added this dependency, and it worked. Just like @StealthRabbi ... I'm also wondering what that actually does. – twindham Dec 1 '17 at 20:28
  • @StealthRabbi This adds a dependency to a templating framework called Thymeleaf, which is an alternative and the preferred approach to JSP. This answer is not a real answer imo, throwing around dependencies does not help anybody who is really interested in the core issue – Christian Aug 19 '19 at 9:43
5

I added this dependency and it solved my problem.

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>

    <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-thymeleaf</artifactId>
</dependency>
| improve this answer | |
  • Here's my theory: If we 're using "@Controller", somehow Spring would require us to have a certain template engine. And in this case, Thymeleaf. Therefore, spring-boot-starter-thymeleaf is required. Whereas if we're using "@RestController", Spring Boot wouldn't require a template engine. And therefore, it works without Thymeleaf. – Yosi Pramajaya Feb 8 '19 at 23:49
4

I am developing Spring Boot application for a few weeks.. And i was gettig same error like below;

Whitelabel Error Page This application has no explicit mapping for /error, so you are seeing this as a fallback. Thu Jan 18 14:12:11 AST 2018 There was an unexpected error (type=Not Found, status=404). No message available

When i get this error massage i realized my controller or rest controller class is note defined in my project. I mean our all controller packages aren't same package with main class which include @SpringBootApplication annotation.. I mean you need to add you controller package's name to @ComponentScan annotation to your main class which is inludes @SpringBootApplication annotation.If you write codes of below your problem will be solving... Most important thing is you have to add your all controller's package to @ComponentScan annotation like i did in the below

package com.example.demo;

import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.ComponentScan;

@SpringBootApplication
@ComponentScan({ "com.controller.package1, com.controller.package2, com.controller.package3, com.controller.packageN", "controller", "service" } // If our Controller class or Service class is not in the same packages we have //to add packages's name like this...directory(package) with main class
public class MainApp {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(MainApp.class, args);
    }
}

I hope this codes are going to help someone...

If you find another way to solve this error or you have some suggestions for me, please write to comments... thanks...

| improve this answer | |
4

In the main class, after the configuration "@SpringBootApplication", adding "@ComponentScan" without having any arguments, worked for me !!!

Main Class :

@SpringBootApplication
@ComponentScan
public class CommentStoreApplication {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(CommentStoreApplication.class, args);

    }
}

RestController Class :

@RestController
public class CommentStoreApp {

    @RequestMapping("/") 
    public String hello() {
        return "Hello World!";
    }
}

P.S: Don't miss to run mvn clean and mvn install commands, before launching the application

| improve this answer | |
4

Quite late to the party. As per spring official documentation "Spring Boot installs a whitelabel error page that you see in a browser client if you encounter a server error." https://docs.spring.io/spring-boot/docs/current/reference/htmlsingle/#howto-customize-the-whitelabel-error-page

  1. You can disable the feature by setting server.error.whitelabel.enabled=false in application.yml or application.properties file.

2.Recommended way is set your error page so that end user can understand. Under resources/templates folder create a error.html file and add dependency in pom.xml file

<dependency>
<groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
<artifactId>spring-boot-starter-thymeleaf</artifactId>
</dependency>

Spring will automatically choose the error.html page as the default error template. Note:- Don't forget to update maven project after adding dependency.

| improve this answer | |
3

You might be getting the error i.e.

"This application has no explicit mapping for /error, so you are seeing this as a fallback."

This is because it is not scanning your Controller & Service classes which you have to specify in your main() class like this,

package com.example.demo;
import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.EnableAutoConfiguration;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.ComponentScan;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
@Configuration
@EnableAutoConfiguration
**@ComponentScan({"com.example.demo", "controller", "service"})**
public class SpringBootMvcExample1Application {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(SpringBootMvcExample1Application.class, args);
    }
}

Note: Here, I have specified various classes like demo, controller and service to be scanned then only it will work properly.

| improve this answer | |
3

You have to organize the packages so that the package containing public static main(or where you wrote @SpringBootApplication), the father of all your other packages.

| improve this answer | |
  • - com.mypackage +nameApplication.java - com.mypachage.model - com.mypachage.controller - com.mypachage.dao – sakgeek May 9 '19 at 10:17
3

By default spring boot will scan current package for bean definition. So if your current package where main class is defined and controller package is not same or controller package is not child package of your main app package it will not scan the controller. To solve this issue one can include list of packages for bean definition in main package

@SpringBootApplication(scanBasePackages = {"com.module.restapi1.controller"})

or create a hierarchy of package where child package is derived from main package

package com.module.restapi;
package com.module.restapi.controller
| improve this answer | |
2

The problem is that you are navigating to localhost:8080/ instead of localhost:8080/upload as prescribed in the guide. Spring Boot has a default error page used when you navigate to an undefined route to avoid giving away server specific details (which can be viewed as a security risk).

You're options are to either: visit the right page, add your own landing page, or override the white error page.

To simplify this particular situation, I updated the guide so that it uses / instead of /upload.

| improve this answer | |
2

I know it's not exactly answer to question, but this question is first which appears on Google :)

Problem ("This application has no explicit mapping for /error") appears when trying to access Swagger UI.

In my case problems were caused by @RestController("/endpoint"), which isn't handled properly by swagger.

So, this resulted in errors:

@RestController("/endpoint")
public class EndpointController {

And this was fine

@RestController
@RequestMapping("/endpoint")
public class EndpointController {
| improve this answer | |
2

this can happen if you forget the @RestController annotation on top of your controller class import import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

and add the annotation as below

refer the simple example below

import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;


@RestController
public class HelloController {
@RequestMapping("/")
    public String index() {
        return "Greetings from Spring Boot!";
    }

}
| improve this answer | |
1

Change @Controller to @RestController in your controller class and everything should go smoothly.

| improve this answer | |
1

I too got the same error and was able to resolve the error by adding the below dependency to my pom.xml.

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.tomcat.embed</groupId>
    <artifactId>tomcat-embed-jasper</artifactId>
    <scope>provided</scope>
</dependency>

Reason is we are using JSP as the view. Default embedded servlet container for Spring Boot Starter Web is tomcat. To enable support for JSP’s, we would need to add a dependency on tomcat-embed-jasper.

In my case I was returning a JSP as view from controller. Hope this answer helps someone who are struggling with same issue.

| improve this answer | |
1

I was facing this issue and then later realized that I was missing the @Configuration annotation in the MvcConfig class which basically does the mapping for ViewControllers and setViewNames.

Here is the content of the file :

import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.config.annotation.ViewControllerRegistry;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.config.annotation.WebMvcConfigurer;
**@Configuration**
public class MvcConfig implements WebMvcConfigurer{
   public void addViewControllers(ViewControllerRegistry registry)
   {
      registry.addViewController("/").setViewName("login");
      registry.addViewController("/login").setViewName("login");
      registry.addViewController("/dashboard").setViewName("dashboard");
   }
}

Hope this helps somebody!!

| improve this answer | |
1

Ensure that you have jasper and jstl in the list of dependencies:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.tomcat.embed</groupId>
    <artifactId>tomcat-embed-jasper</artifactId>
    <scope>provided</scope>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>javax.servlet</groupId>
    <artifactId>jstl</artifactId>
</dependency>

Here is a working starter project - https://github.com/spring-projects/spring-boot/tree/master/spring-boot-samples/spring-boot-sample-web-jsp

Author: Biju Kunjummen

| improve this answer | |
1

Main class need to be outside of your app packages tree structure. For example: example

| improve this answer | |
0

All I have done to solve this kind of problem is to mention anotation @Configuration in MVCConfig Class.

Like this one :

package com.example;

/**
 * Created by sartika.s.hasibuan on 1/10/2017.
 */
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.EnableAutoConfiguration;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.ComponentScan;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.config.annotation.ViewControllerRegistry;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.config.annotation.WebMvcConfigurerAdapter;

@EnableAutoConfiguration
@Configuration
@ComponentScan
public class MvcConfig extends WebMvcConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    public void addViewControllers(ViewControllerRegistry registry) {
        registry.addViewController("/home").setViewName("home");
        registry.addViewController("/").setViewName("home");
        registry.addViewController("/hello").setViewName("hello");
        registry.addViewController("/login").setViewName("login");
    }

}
| improve this answer | |
0

I had a similar mistake, I use the spring boot and velocity, my solution is to check the file application.properties, spring.velocity.toolbox-config-location found that this property is wrong

| improve this answer | |
0

In my case, this problem occurs when running the SpringApplication from within IntelliJ after running it first with maven.

To solve the problem, I run first mvn clean. Then I run SpringApplication from within IntelliJ.

| improve this answer | |
0

Make sure your Main.class should be on top of your controllers. In case of the following example:

Main.class containing:

@SpringBootApplication
public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(Main.class, args);
    }
}

EmployeeController.class containing:

@RestController
public class EmployeeController {
    @InitBinder
    public void setAllowedFields(WebDataBinder dataBinder) {
        dataBinder.setDisallowedFields("id");
    }

    @RequestMapping(value = "/employee/save", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public String save(){
        Employee newEmp = new Employee();
        newEmp.setAge(25);
        newEmp.setFirstName("Pikachu");
        newEmp.setId(100);
        return "Name: " + newEmp.getFirstName() + ", Age: " + newEmp.getAge() + ", Id = " + newEmp.getId();
    }
}

If your main class is in the root folder, just like this path: {projectname}/src/main/java/main then make sure your controllers below your Main class. For example {projectname}/src/main/java/main/controllers.

| improve this answer | |
0

In your java file ( say: Viper.java )having main class add: "@RestController" and @RequestMapping("/")

@SpringBootApplication
@RestController
public class Viper {

  @RequestMapping("/")

   public String home(){
          return "This is what i was looking for";                      
     }

public static void main( String[] args){

   SpringApplication.run(Viper.class , args);
}

}
| improve this answer | |
0

Do check if you have marked the controller class with @RestController annotation.

| improve this answer | |
0

it means you are trying to access the page which is not there. suppose your jsp file is at /webapp/home.jsp now if you use @RequestMapping("/home") on your code and return "home.jsp"; then you will get this error if you try to access using localhost:port/ but if you try localhost:port/home there will be no error you can fix this by checking your @RequestMapping("/") here put /mapping_path of the page you are trying to access. and you can also try adding a dependency of tomcat jaspher from maven dependency

| improve this answer | |
0

I was facing the same problem, using gradle and it got solved on adding following dependencies-

compile('org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-data-jpa')
compile('org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web')
testCompile('org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-test')
compile('org.apache.tomcat.embed:tomcat-embed-jasper')

earlier I was missing the last one causing the same error.

| improve this answer | |

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