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Is there any way to create a range of numbers in Python like MATLAB using a simple syntax, i.e, not using loops. For example:

MATLAB: a = 1:0.5:10 give a = [1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 .... 9.5 10]

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  • 3
    use the range function Jun 30, 2015 at 16:37
  • 4
    In the likely event that you're using numpy, there's a similar arange; note that range and arange are both half-open, they exclude the stop (e.g. np.arange(1, 10, 0.5) will be array([ 1. , 1.5, 2. , ... , 8.5, 9. , 9.5])).
    – jonrsharpe
    Jun 30, 2015 at 16:38
  • range didn't work with floating increment, if i use np.arange, then how to include the increment after?
    – efirvida
    Jun 30, 2015 at 17:25

4 Answers 4

8

As others have pointed out, np.arange gets you closest to what you are used to from matlab. However, np.arange excludes the end point. The solution that you proposed in your own answer can lead to wrong results (see my comment).

This however, will always work:

start = 0
stop = 3
step = 0.5
a = np.arange(start, stop+step, step)

For further reading: Especially if you are an experienced matlab-user, this guide/cheat sheet might be interesting: http://wiki.scipy.org/NumPy_for_Matlab_Users

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6

Numpy has arange and r_ which look something like this:

import numpy as np
print(np.arange(1, 3, .5))
# [ 1.   1.5  2.   2.5]
print(np.r_[1:3:.5])
# [ 1.   1.5  2.   2.5]

Notice that it is a little different than matlab, first the order of the stop and step are reversed in numpy compared to matlab, and second the stop is not included the the result. You might also consider using linspace it's often preferred over arange when you're working with floating point numbers because num can be defined more precisely than step:

print(np.linspace(1, 3, num=5))
# [ 1.   1.5  2.   2.5  3. ]

or

print(np.linspace(1, 3, num=4, endpoint=False))
# [ 1.   1.5  2.   2.5]
1
  • miss parenthesis on print(np.linspace(1, 3, num=5) may be print(np.linspace(1, 3, num=5)) but thanks!!! +1. i solve my problem using np.append(np.arange(start, stop, step),stop)
    – efirvida
    Jun 30, 2015 at 18:04
2
import numpy as np
a = np.arange(1, 10, 0.5)
print (a)
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  • 5
    Why would you convert the array back to a list (and, if you were particularly determined to do so, why [a for a in ...] rather than list(...))?!
    – jonrsharpe
    Jun 30, 2015 at 16:41
  • 2
    I guess he said without using loops. Jun 30, 2015 at 16:47
0

Python's built in xrange function can generate integers like so:

xrange(start, stop, step)

But xrange cannot do floats.

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