15

I want my program to wait after below line

frmProgressBarObj = PullMSI.ExtractByMSIName("products.txt", false);

as above method is internally calling thread through StartProcessWithProgress() method . I want that thread to be completed before //code logic -2 line gets executed. At the same time, It should not stop UI update done by frmProgressBar.UpdateProgress(). How do I do this?

namespace NS1
{
    public partial class frmMain : Form
    {                
        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            frmProgressBar frmProgressBarObj = PullMSI.ExtractByMSIName("products.txt", false);
            //code logic - 2
            MessageBox.Show("This is executing immediately. 
                             I want to wait until above thread is complete");
        }
    }

    public partial class frmProgressBar : Form
    {

        public void UpdateProgress(String strTextToDisplayOnProgress)
        {
            progressBar1.BeginInvoke(
                   new Action(() => 
                   { 
                       progressBar1.Value++; 
                       lblFileName.Text = strTextToDisplayOnProgress;
                       if (progressBar1.Value == progressBar1.Maximum)
                       {
                           this.Hide(); 
                        } 
                    }));
        }

        public delegate void DelProgress();

        public void StartProcessWithProgress(DelProgress delMethodCode, int maxCount)
        {
            InitializeProgress(maxCount);
            Thread backgroundThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(delMethodCode));
            backgroundThread.Start();
        }
    }

    public static class PullMSI
    {
        public static frmProgressBar ExtractByMSIName(String strProductFilePath, bool reNameMSI)
        {
            frmProgressBar frmProgressBar = new frmProgressBar();

            frmProgressBar.StartProcessWithProgress(() =>
            {
                //StreamRader sr declaration and other code

                while (!sr.EndOfStream)
                {
                    //logic here
                    frmProgressBar.UpdateProgress("Copying sr.msiname");
                }
            }, 2);

            return frmProgressBar;
        }
    }
}
5
  • 1
    UI? This is a console application. Commented Jul 1, 2015 at 12:01
  • 3
    My bad. Sorry, In order to simplify code, I just put all classes in console application so that I can easily post here. But its Windows form application and process start on button click. Commented Jul 1, 2015 at 12:16
  • 1
    You can use either of these: 1) TPL with task continuation 2) Reset events (ManualResetEventSlim/AutoResetEventSlim) 3) Using other mechanism such as Semaphore (highly discourage your from doing this) 4) async/await if you're running .Net 4.5+. 5) Producer/Consumer (overkill for your use-case). Basically there are a variety of ways this is possible. Do a read up on these and pick one that you like most.
    – kha
    Commented Jul 1, 2015 at 12:16
  • Actually I have not used these techniques before and it will take time for me to learn. Client expectation is haunting me :( any code sample will be great help. Commented Jul 1, 2015 at 12:19
  • You must not wait in a UI event-handler - it's a state-machine and must service its input queue promptly. Bocking waits with events/semaphores are not useable at all. Message signalling systems like Invoke/BeginInvoke are saner. Commented Jul 1, 2015 at 16:21

2 Answers 2

38

Below are three different ways you can achieve what you want:

1. Using reset events (further reading). If your C# version doesn't have the ManualResetEventSlim, replace it with ManualResetEvent and change Wait() with WaitOne()

class LockingWithResetEvents
{
    private readonly ManualResetEvent _resetEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);

    public void Test()
    {
        MethodUsingResetEvents();
    }

    private void MethodUsingResetEvents()
    {
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(_ => DoSomethingLong());
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(_ => ShowMessageBox());
    }

    private void DoSomethingLong()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Doing something.");
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        _resetEvent.Set();
    }

    private void ShowMessageBox()
    {
        _resetEvent.WaitOne();
        Console.WriteLine("Hello world.");
    }
}

2) Using Task Parallel Library (TPL). (Further reading)

class LockingWithTPL
{
    public void Test()
    {
        Task.Factory.StartNew(DoSomethingLong).ContinueWith(result => ShowMessageBox());
    }

    private void DoSomethingLong()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Doing something.");
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }

    private void ShowMessageBox()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello world.");
    }
}

3) Using Async/Await. (Further reading)

class LockingWithAwait
{
    public void Test()
    {
        DoSomething();
    }

    private async void DoSomething()
    {
        await Task.Run(() => DoSomethingLong());
        ShowMessageBox();
    }

    private async void DoSomethingLong()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Doing something.");
        Thread.Sleep(10000);
    }

    private void ShowMessageBox()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello world.");
    }
}

Also good to know: Mutex, Semaphore, lock, SemaphoreSlim, Monitor and Interlocked.

4
  • Doesn't your Test method need to be declared Async also? I thought that all methods that call Async methods had to also be Async. Async/Await is still a little new to me, so I may have that wrong. Commented Jul 1, 2015 at 12:59
  • @BradleyUffner Doesn't have to. I'm not awaiting anything. If you're not awaiting it, it doesn't need the async keyword and will instead treat it as a simple method with void return type. This however would not compile: await DoSomething();.
    – kha
    Commented Jul 1, 2015 at 13:02
  • NO, no, no waiting in UI event-handlers! Commented Jul 1, 2015 at 16:19
  • @MartinJames Was that meant for me? none of the three solutions I have posted will block the calling thread I believe.
    – kha
    Commented Jul 2, 2015 at 4:04
2

If you're using .NET 4.0 (with VS2012) or above, you can do this quite easily with the Task Parallel Library and async-await:

private async void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    frmProgressBar frmProgressBarObj = await Task.Run(() =>
                      PullMSI.ExtractByMSIName("products.txt", false));

    MessageBox.Show(string.Format("Returned {0}", frmProgressBarObj.ToString());
}

For .NET 4, you'll need to add Microsoft.Bcl.Async.

4
  • 2
    It's worth noting that this is an option only if the author is working with .NET 4.5
    – Tom C.
    Commented Jul 1, 2015 at 12:26
  • @TomC. .NET 4.0 also supports async-await with Microsoft.Bcl.Async. Commented Jul 1, 2015 at 12:27
  • 1
    @YuvalItzchakov For some values of "support"
    – Aron
    Commented Jul 1, 2015 at 13:09
  • It's not native and requires a lot of hacking and tweaking for .NET 4. Not the approach you want, especially for more complex use-cases
    – DerpyNerd
    Commented Nov 8, 2016 at 14:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.