1

Can someone explain me why i'm getting the results as below? (look at the comments).

class A {
    public function foo() {         // foo from B
    //private function foo() {      // foo from A
        echo "foo from A</br>";
    }
    public function test() {
        $this->foo();
    }
}

class B extends A {
    public function foo() {
        echo "foo from B</br>";
    }
}

$b = new B();
$b->test();

Shouldn't i always get "foo from B" while "this" pointing to class B object?

  • 1
    What results do you get? When I run the script here the output is foo from B</br> as expected. – VolkerK Jul 1 '15 at 12:12
  • 1
    If the 'foo()` function was made available to sub classes via 'protected' or 'public' qualifiers then it works as you expect. However, it would be made clear in the interface or abstract class. In the previous case where foo() was private then it would not be mentioned anywhere available to you. – Ryan Vincent Jul 1 '15 at 15:15
0

Because $this is using late binding method,

read official documentation about bindings (static or non-static does not matter)

http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.late-static-bindings.php

  • Yes I've read official documentation thousand times but i can't understand theirs explanation. So can You explain me the case in Yours way? – Mulligan1981 Jul 1 '15 at 13:21
  • late binding means late (last) extended class – user2594803 Jul 1 '15 at 13:23
  • So late (last) extended class is B? – Mulligan1981 Jul 1 '15 at 13:49
  • So $this in test method reefers to B class and that's why the result is "foo from B"? – Mulligan1981 Jul 1 '15 at 13:53

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