6

I have these Enum declarations:

enum MessageType{  
    REQ_LOGIN,
    REQ_GET_FIELD,       

    RES_LOGIN,
    RES_GET_FIELD
}

enum Request{
    REQ_LOGIN,
    REQ_GET_FIELD
};

enum Respond{
    RES_LOGIN,
    RES_GET_FIELD
};

Obviously I'm repeating elements in Enum's. Is there any way to prevent this?

EDIT: I'm using "MessageType" on a general purpose class to send it through network, on the other side I parse the object of this class and dispatch message. But I have different clients; some expects only objects with "Request" type member and some expects only objects with "Response" type member.

Using "Message" class, I'm creating "DispatcherRequest"s.

class Message
{
public:
……….
    MessageType messageType;
}


struct DispatcherRequest
{
..........
    Request type;
};
  • 1
    I think you need to elaborate on what those enumerations represent. As it is now it makes no sense, why is MessageType a union of the two others for example? – Skurmedel Jun 25 '10 at 11:10
  • @Skurmedel, Edited – metdos Jun 25 '10 at 11:22
  • Thank you, now I see :) Another question, will Request and Respond always share members (only the prefix changing)? – Skurmedel Jun 25 '10 at 11:30
  • @Skurmedel, I'm not sure what you exactly mean by "share members", but there is a response for all request. – metdos Jun 25 '10 at 11:40
  • @metdos: is it guaranteed that if Request has REQ_LOGIN then Respond must also have a RES_LOGIN? – Mooing Duck Mar 7 '13 at 20:53
6

Why not try something like this?

enum MainType{  
    REQUEST,
    RESPONSE
};

enum SubType{
    LOGIN,
    GET_FIELD
};

class Message {
   MainType type;
   SubType sub_type;
   ...
};
  • +1. I think this is a neat solution, but maybe with some information it can be refined further. – Skurmedel Jun 25 '10 at 11:33
  • +1. Although, it is not what I exactly need, it is an innovative solution. – metdos Jun 25 '10 at 11:36
  • You could combine this answer with Thomas's. Define enum MainType in class Message and define enum SubType in class Request and class Response. Move SubType sub_type from Message into Request and Response. This allows each message type to have its own distinct subtypes (read: only the legal ones). Then the enum values in the code look like Message::REQUEST and Response::GET_FIELD, which is about as readable as you can get. – Mike DeSimone Jun 25 '10 at 12:32
4

This is hard to say without knowing the idea behind this design, but you might consider a more object-oriented approach. Something along the lines of:

class Message {
    public:
        virtual void send() = 0;
};

class Request : public Message {
    public:
        virtual void send();
}

class Response : public Message {
    public:
        virtual void send();
}
  • 1
    I need Enums as class members, I don't see your point. – metdos Jun 25 '10 at 11:25
  • Sorry about that, but I don't see your point either. Maybe if you elaborated the thoughts behind your design a bit more, show us what these enums are modelling and how this code is used? – Thomas Jun 25 '10 at 11:40
  • @Thomas, Edited – metdos Jun 25 '10 at 11:53
  • 1
    I think you forgot : public Message in two places. – Mike DeSimone Jun 25 '10 at 12:37
  • @Mike DeSimone: So I did, thanks! – Thomas Jun 25 '10 at 18:08
2

You allude to polymorphic enumerations, why not just use one enumeration and name it whatever you had planned on naming the base enumeration, say "Message Type"? This would keep you from repeating elements.

  • I don't want client to know other elements of general enumeration. – metdos Jun 25 '10 at 11:21
  • I understand your point, but from the code posted it looks as if your attempt to isolate the clients from the other elements may be overkill. As coded, if you change either enumeration your clients will have to be re-compiled. Additionally, on the client side, they don't necessarily have to "know" about the other enumeration values. They can just ignore the ones they don't care about. – nathan Jun 25 '10 at 12:16
2

In case my comment on PeterK's answer is as clear as mud, here's the resulting code:

class Message {
public:
    enum MainType {  
        REQUEST,
        RESPONSE
    };
    Message(MainType type_): type(type_) {}
    virtual void send() = 0;
private:
    MainType type;
};

class Request: public Message {
public:
    enum SubType {
        LOGIN,
        GET_FIELD
    };
    Request(SubType sub_type_): Message(Message::REQUEST), 
        sub_type(sub_type_) {}
    virtual void send();
private:
    SubType sub_type;
};

class Response: public Message {
public:
    enum SubType {
        LOGIN,
        GET_FIELD
    };
    Response(SubType sub_type_): Message(Message::RESPONSE), 
        sub_type(sub_type_) {}
    virtual void send();
private:
    SubType sub_type;
};
0

Spy from java (sorry for draft view):

class MessageType
{  
protected:
    MessageType(int value);//visible for descending classes only
    MessageType(const MessageType& other);
public:
    static const MessageType REQ_LOGIN, //assign later with integer value
    REQ_GET_FIELD,       

    RES_LOGIN,
   RES_GET_FIELD;
}

clas Request : public MessageType
{
};

clas Respond : public MessageType
{
};
0

In your code example, values from enum Request and enum Response have the same values (0 for REQ_LOGIN and RES_LOGIN and 1 for REQ_GET_FIELD and RES_GET_FIELD), and their values do not comply with values in enum MessageType (0 for REQ_LOGIN, 1 for REQ_GET_FIELD, 2 for RES_LOGIN and 3 for RES_GET_FIELD). Isn't this a problem?

If you want to have consistent numbers of enums, you can try the following aproach:

enum MessageCategories
{
Request = 0,
Response,
AnythingElse
}
const int Watermark = 100;

this enum MessageCategories and const int Watermark are common to all classes. Now you can redefine your enums like following:

enum Request
{
REQ_LOGIN = MessageCategories::Request * Watermark,
REQ_GET_FIELD,
REQ_LAST_ITEM,
}
enum Response
{
RES_LOGIN = MessageCategories::Response * Watermark,
RES_GET_FIELD,
RES_LAST_ITEM,
}

In this case, you don't need your enum MessageType, because all your enum codes are consistent.

  • Yes it is a problem, but in your solution how can I use void sendMessage(MessageType mes); function? Do you propose to use "int" instead of enum in function headers? – metdos Jun 25 '10 at 11:57
  • Yes, you have to use 'int' instead of enum in general functions, which deal with all enum values. However, you still can use specific enums for specific functions. – Haspemulator Jun 26 '10 at 2:48
0

why won't you just do something like this:

void sendMessage(Request); void sendMessage(Respond);

Simple overload?

  • What will be happen to MessageType member in Message Class. – metdos Jun 25 '10 at 12:20
0

Perhaps by not using enums ?

I always feel constrained with C++ enums... they just don't offer enough flexibility for my tastes.

class MessageType
{
public:
  virtual ~MessageType();
  bool operator==(MessageType const& rhs) const;
  bool operator!=(MessageType const& rhs) const;
protected:
  MessageType(const char* type);
private:
  const char* mType;
};

class RequestType: public MessageType
{
public:
  static RequestType const Login() { return RequestType("Login"); }
  static RequestType const GetField { return RequestType("GetField"); }
protected:
  RequestType(const char* type);
};

// same for ResponseType

Here you have polymorphic behavior, and you can restrict the client:

void someServerFunc(MessageType const& type);

void someClientFunc(RequestType const& type);

Tadaaam!

0

perhaps the approach I gave in response to this question might better suit your design goals. For clarity, here is the code adapted to your question.

typedef struct{
    enum {
        LOGIN,
        GET_FIELD
    };
}MessageType;

typedef struct : public MessageType {
    //this struct inherits the fields of MessageType,
    //and can be accessed in code like so, Request::LOGIN or Request::GET_FIELD

    //omit this enum declaration if you do not wish to extend the base enum
    enum {
        //additional fields here
    };
}Request;

typedef struct : public MessageType {
    enum {
        //additional fields here
    };
}Response;

The only caveat I've encountered so far is that the fields of the Request type and Response type can be directly compared to each other using == or !=, regardless of the 2 being distinct types.

This might not be the case if implementing strongly typed enums in C++11, but my compiler doesn't support that feature, so I can't test.

Hope this helps. Cheers!

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