1

This function will always return "foobar":

/**
 * @return {string}
 */
function foobar() {

    var x = true;

    if (x) {
        return 'foobar';
    }

}

When compiled with this command:

java -jar compiler-20150609.jar --js test.js --warning_level VERBOSE

this warning is raised:

test.js:4: WARNING - Missing return statement. Function expected to return string.
function foobar() {
^

Similarly, this function will always return a string:

/**
 * @param  {boolean} bool
 * @return {string}
 */
function convertBoolToString(bool) {

    var boolstring = bool ? 'true' : 'false';

    switch (boolstring) {
        case 'true':
            return 'yes';
        case 'false':
            return 'no';
    }

}

Again, the compiler raises the warning about "Missing return statement. Function expected to return string."

I know the warnings can be suppressed by adding @suppress {missingReturn}, but I'd like to know if there's a better solution. Is there a "hint" that can be provided for the compiler's flow analysis? Maybe something similar to a type cast (which is useful in cases where type-checking doesn't accurately infer the type of an expression) ?


Update

I should have made it clearer that I'm looking for a solution which only involves "hinting" the compiler. For example: using a suitable JSDoc tag or supplying a particular CLI flag to the compiler to alter its flow analysis.

I'm not looking for a solution which involves modifying the JS source code to "keep the compiler happy".

The disadvantage of @chsdk's solution is that the return variable must be initialised with a dummy value of the correct type. If the return type is a class instance, then a dummy instance has to be created, and the constructor may require parameters which must also be given dummy values. In my opinion, this is a code smell: the dummy value of the return variable will never be used, and it's actually a workaround for an unrelated problem (a compiler warning).

I'm looking for a solution like this:

/**
 * @return {string}
 */
function foobar() {

    var x = true;

    /** @alwaysreturns */
    if (x) {
        return 'foobar';
    }

}

Does the compiler support a JSDoc tag such as @alwaysreturns, or other similar "hinting" mechanism for flow analysis? Maybe a CLI flag?

2
  • Maybe it wants you to make sure you always return something. Your code will logically always return a string but if you disregard the logic, a switch could not have a matching case => no return and the if expression could be false, skipping the body ==> no return. – MrSangrief Jul 2 '15 at 9:36
  • try annotating the inline return like this function /** number */ foo(x) { return x - 1; } . here number is teh return type – dreamweiver Jul 2 '15 at 9:40
2

Closure Compiler does not have any "hint" mechanism to modify the Control Flow Analysis. You are stuck with disabling the warning group altogether, @suppress annotations or modifying the code.

1

Simply use a variable to store the return string, which is initialized with a default value, here's the code:

/**
 * @return {string}
 */
function foobar() {
   var myReturn = "default";
   var x = true;
    if (x) {
        myReturn = 'foobar';
    }
    return myReturn;
}

And for the second function just return the string you don't need the switch statement:

/**
 * @param  {boolean} bool
 * @return {string}
 */
function convertBoolToString(bool) {
    var boolstring = bool ? 'true' : 'false';
    return boolstring;
}

Or even better:

/**
 * @param  {boolean} bool
 * @return {string}
 */
function convertBoolToString(bool) {         
    return bool ? 'true' : 'false';
}

Directly return the result depending on the inputed bool parameter, without any variable declaration.

2
  • Thank you for your answer. I should have made it clearer that I'm looking for a solution which only involves "hinting" the compiler. I'm not looking for a solution which involves modifying the JS source code to "keep the compiler happy". I'm sorry for the misunderstanding. I've now updated my question. – TachyonVortex Jul 2 '15 at 17:24
  • Also, I know the convertBoolToString() function can be refactored to remove the switch and boolstring, but that's not the point. The purpose of the function is to demonstrate a situation which causes the "Missing return statement" warning due to limitations of the compiler's flow analysis. – TachyonVortex Jul 2 '15 at 17:24
0

Add @suppress {missingReturn} to the functions JSDoc.

6
  • Thank you for your answer, but I said in my question: "I know the warnings can be suppressed by adding @suppress {missingReturn}, but I'd like to know if there's a better solution. Is there a "hint" that can be provided for the compiler's flow analysis?" – TachyonVortex Jul 5 '15 at 9:56
  • What "hint" did you have in mind that wasn't a @suppress and doesn't involve modifying the code? "@suppress {missingReturn}" is the "hint". – John Jul 8 '15 at 6:56
  • The purpose of a "hint" is to give the compiler useful information which the developer knows but the compiler doesn't. For example, a C developer who knows that certain functions will be called frequently/rarely can use hot/cold to hint the compiler's optimiser (see: Helping The Compiler Help You). @suppress {missingReturn} is not a hint, because it doesn't give the compiler useful information. It doesn't help the compiler understand that a value will always be returned. It just suppresses the compiler's warning. – TachyonVortex Jul 10 '15 at 11:44
  • Closure Compiler supports a type cast hint: "In cases where type-checking doesn't accurately infer the type of an expression, it is possible to add a type cast comment" (ref). This hint helps the compiler understand the type of an expression. I'm looking for a control flow analysis hint which helps the compiler understand that a particular block of code will always return (or that a particular condition will always be true). – TachyonVortex Jul 10 '15 at 11:44
  • Sorry, there are no such hints. I can imagine it would be possible to the enumerate all the possible values for a switch as a "hint" but that doesn't seem generally useful. Have you seen CFA "hints" in other languages or tools that you have found useful? – John Jul 13 '15 at 14:57
-1

You have to provide return value. But here in your code return value is conditional, this is why your are getting this error.

function foobar() {
    var returnValue = "default"
    var x = true;

    if (x) {
        returnValue =  'foobar';
    }

    return returnValue;

}

function convertBoolToString(bool) {
    var returnValue = "default";
    var boolstring = bool ? 'true' : 'false';

    switch (boolstring) {
        case 'true':
            returnValue = 'yes';
        case 'false':
            returnValue = 'no';
    }
    return returnValue;
}

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