28

Let's say I have an integer called 'score', that looks like this:

int score = 1529587;

Now what I want to do is get each digit 1, 5, 2, 9, 5, 8, 7 from the score using bitwise operators(See below edit note).

I'm pretty sure this can be done since I've once used a similar method to extract the red green and blue values from a hexadecimal colour value.

How would I do this?

Edit
It doesn't necessarily have to be bitwise operators, I just thought it'd be simpler that way.

2
  • 1
    Since I did not find it in my personal bit operator compendium (graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html), I do not think that this is possible without some deeper elaboration. – phimuemue Jun 25 '10 at 13:49
  • if they are decimal you can't get them using bitwise. if they are hexadecimal then it is possible. please specify. – Andrey Jun 25 '10 at 13:52

10 Answers 10

56

You use the modulo operator:

while(score)
{
    printf("%d\n", score % 10);
    score /= 10;
}

Note that this will give you the digits in reverse order (i.e. least significant digit first). If you want the most significant digit first, you'll have to store the digits in an array, then read them out in reverse order.

7
  • 1
    I'm pretty sure modulo is not a bitwise operator – Cyril Gandon Jun 25 '10 at 13:48
  • 2
    @Scorpi0: No, it isn't... but there's no sensible way to do this using bitwise operators, and I think this is what the OP was looking for. – Martin B Jun 25 '10 at 13:49
  • i think what OP meant hexadecimal and it is possible to solve with bitwise. – Andrey Jun 25 '10 at 13:52
  • 3
    @Andrey from the example it's clear OP is asking about decimal digits. – Geoff Jun 25 '10 at 13:55
  • This solution assumes score >= 0. If score<0 then this function will never terminate. – Kuai Feb 1 '16 at 9:40
4

RGB values fall nicely on bit boundaries; decimal digits don't. I don't think there's an easy way to do this using bitwise operators at all. You'd need to use decimal operators like modulo 10 (% 10).

1
  • 1
    +1 He's right, decimal (base 10) numbers do not partition on bits (base 2), except for numbers that are powers of 2 (like 256 = 2^8 for colors). Since 10 is not a power of 2, you will not be able to use bitwise operators. – Geoff Jun 25 '10 at 13:49
4

Agree with previous answers.

A little correction: There's a better way to print the decimal digits from left to right, without allocating extra buffer. In addition you may want to display a zero characeter if the score is 0 (the loop suggested in the previous answers won't print anythng).

This demands an additional pass:

int div;
for (div = 1; div <= score; div *= 10)
    ;

do
{
    div /= 10;
    printf("%d\n", score / div);
    score %= div;
} while (score);
3
  • 1
    This solution causes a divide by zero when score is zero. – Shepmaster Jan 8 '17 at 19:58
  • This solution also fails due to overflow when score >= ceil (INT_MAX / 10.0). I've provided a solution which works correction for the entire range [0, UINT_MAX]. – Britton Kerin Jun 14 '17 at 7:01
  • This solution also fails for any number with 0 digits in the least significant position or positions. Those zeros aren't printed. The corrected solution I've provided avoids this problem also. – Britton Kerin Jun 15 '17 at 20:08
2

Don't reinvent the wheel. C has sprintf for a reason.

Since your variable is called score, I'm guessing this is for a game where you're planning to use the individual digits of the score to display the numeral glyphs as images. In this case, sprintf has convenient format modifiers that will let you zero-pad, space-pad, etc. the score to a fixed width, which you may want to use.

1
  • I like how you analyzed EXACTLY what I was going to use it for Thanks a lot! – Johannes Jensen Jun 26 '10 at 8:02
1

This solution gives correct results over the entire range [0,UINT_MAX] without requiring digits to be buffered.

It also works for wider types or signed types (with positive values) with appropriate type changes.

This kind of approach is particularly useful on tiny environments (e.g. Arduino bootloader) because it doesn't end up pulling in all the printf() bloat (when printf() isn't used for demo output) and uses very little RAM. You can get a look at value just by blinking a single led :)

#include <limits.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int
main (void)
{
  unsigned int score = 42;   // Works for score in [0, UINT_MAX]

  printf ("score via printf:     %u\n", score);   // For validation

  printf ("score digit by digit: ");
  unsigned int div = 1;
  unsigned int digit_count = 1;
  while ( div <= score / 10 ) {
    digit_count++;
    div *= 10;
  }
  while ( digit_count > 0 ) {
    printf ("%d", score / div);
    score %= div;
    div /= 10;
    digit_count--;
  }
  printf ("\n");

  return 0;
}
0

Usually, this problem resolve with using the modulo of a number in a loop or convert a number to a string. For convert a number to a string, you may can use the function itoa, so considering the variant with the modulo of a number in a loop.


Content of a file get_digits.c

$ cat get_digits.c 

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>


// return a length of integer
unsigned long int get_number_count_digits(long int number);

// get digits from an integer number into an array
int number_get_digits(long int number, int **digits, unsigned int *len);

// for demo features
void demo_number_get_digits(long int number);


int
main()
{
    demo_number_get_digits(-9999999999999);
    demo_number_get_digits(-10000000000);
    demo_number_get_digits(-1000);
    demo_number_get_digits(-9);
    demo_number_get_digits(0);
    demo_number_get_digits(9);
    demo_number_get_digits(1000);
    demo_number_get_digits(10000000000);
    demo_number_get_digits(9999999999999);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}


unsigned long int
get_number_count_digits(long int number)
{
    if (number < 0)
        number = llabs(number);
    else if (number == 0)
        return 1;

    if (number < 999999999999997)
        return floor(log10(number)) + 1;

    unsigned long int count = 0;
    while (number > 0) {
        ++count;
        number /= 10;
    }
    return count;
}


int
number_get_digits(long int number, int **digits, unsigned int *len)
{
    number = labs(number);

    // termination count digits and size of a array as well as
    *len = get_number_count_digits(number);

    *digits = realloc(*digits, *len * sizeof(int));

    // fill up the array
    unsigned int index = 0;
    while (number > 0) {
        (*digits)[index] = (int)(number % 10);
        number /= 10;
        ++index;
    }

    // reverse the array
    unsigned long int i = 0, half_len = (*len / 2);
    int swap;
    while (i < half_len) {
        swap = (*digits)[i];
        (*digits)[i] = (*digits)[*len - i - 1];
        (*digits)[*len - i - 1] = swap;
         ++i;
    }

    return 0;
}


void
demo_number_get_digits(long int number)
{
    int *digits;
    unsigned int len;

    digits = malloc(sizeof(int));

    number_get_digits(number, &digits, &len);

    printf("%ld --> [", number);
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < len; ++i) {
        if (i == len - 1)
            printf("%d", digits[i]);
        else
            printf("%d, ", digits[i]);
    }
    printf("]\n");

    free(digits);
}

Demo with the GNU GCC

$~/Downloads/temp$ cc -Wall -Wextra -std=c11 -o run get_digits.c -lm
$~/Downloads/temp$ ./run
-9999999999999 --> [9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9]
-10000000000 --> [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
-1000 --> [1, 0, 0, 0]
-9 --> [9]
0 --> [0]
9 --> [9]
1000 --> [1, 0, 0, 0]
10000000000 --> [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
9999999999999 --> [9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9]

Demo with the LLVM/Clang

$~/Downloads/temp$ rm run
$~/Downloads/temp$ clang -std=c11 -Wall -Wextra get_digits.c -o run -lm
setivolkylany$~/Downloads/temp$ ./run
-9999999999999 --> [9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9]
-10000000000 --> [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
-1000 --> [1, 0, 0, 0]
-9 --> [9]
0 --> [0]
9 --> [9]
1000 --> [1, 0, 0, 0]
10000000000 --> [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
9999999999999 --> [9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9]

Testing environment

$~/Downloads/temp$ cc --version | head -n 1
cc (Debian 4.9.2-10) 4.9.2
$~/Downloads/temp$ clang --version
Debian clang version 3.5.0-10 (tags/RELEASE_350/final) (based on LLVM 3.5.0)
Target: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix
1
  • itoa is nonstandard, and AFAIK is not implemented on any major platform. – S.S. Anne Jan 3 '20 at 12:21
0
//this can be easily understandable for beginners     
int score=12344534;
int div;
for (div = 1; div <= score; div *= 10)
{

}
/*for (div = 1; div <= score; div *= 10); for loop with semicolon or empty body is same*/
while(score>0)
{
    div /= 10;
    printf("%d\n`enter code here`", score / div);
    score %= div;
}
2
  • it doesn't handle zero's at the end, for example 12344540 would not print last 0 digit – marknorkin Nov 4 '18 at 22:34
  • 1
    quick fix is to use conditional like while(score || div >1) or just while(div >1) – marknorkin Nov 5 '18 at 6:57
0
#include<stdio.h>

int main() {
int num; //given integer
int reminder;
int rev=0; //To reverse the given integer
int count=1;

printf("Enter the integer:");
scanf("%i",&num);

/*First while loop will reverse the number*/
while(num!=0)
{
    reminder=num%10;
    rev=rev*10+reminder;
    num/=10;
}
/*Second while loop will give the number from left to right*/
while(rev!=0)
{
    reminder=rev%10;
    printf("The %d digit is %d\n",count, reminder);
    rev/=10;
    count++; //to give the number from left to right 
}
return (EXIT_SUCCESS);}
2
  • here is a modified version of that that will pad with zero uint64_t num = 5; uint64_t limit = 4; char * what[limit+1]; what[limit+1] = '\0'; uint64_t remainder = 0; uint64_t rev = 0; int count = 1; int digits = 0; while(num!=0) { remainder=num%10; rev=rev*10+remainder; num/=10; digits++; } if (remainder == 1 && digits != remainder) digits--; if (digits < limit) while(digits!=limit) { rev=rev*10; digits++; } while(rev!=0) { remainder=rev%10; what[count] = "0123456789"[remainder]; rev/=10; count++; } – PSP CODER Apr 19 '20 at 9:27
  • in which if num is 5 and limit is 4 then it will produce 0005 – PSP CODER Apr 19 '20 at 9:30
0

First convert your integer to a string using sprintf, then do whatever you want with its elements, that are chars. Assuming an unsigned score:

unsigned int score = 1529587, i;
char stringScore [11] = { 0 };

sprintf( stringScore, "%d, score );

for( i=0; i<strlen(stringScore); i++ )
    printf( "%c\n", stringScore[i] );

Please note how:

  • It prints digits starting from the most significant one
  • stringScore is 11 characters long assuming that the size of int, in your platform, is 4 bytes, so that the maximum integer is 10 digits long. The eleventh one is for the string terminator character '\0'.
  • sprintf makes all the work for you

Do you need to have an integer for every single digit?

Since we are sure that stringScore contains only digits, the conversion is really easy. If dig is the character containing the digit, the corresponding integer can be obtained in this way:

int intDigit = dig - '0';
-1

I've made this solution, it-s simple instead read an integer, i read a string (char array in C), then write with a for bucle, the code also write the sum of digits

// #include<string.h>

scanf("%s", n);
int total = 0;

for (int i = 0; i< strlen(n); i++){
    printf("%c", n[i]);
    total += (int)(n[i]) -48;
}

printf("%d", total);

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