3
public class Temp {
public static void main(String args[]) {
    A ref;
    B objB = new B();
    C objC = new C();
    ref = objB;
    ref.show();
    ref = objC;
    ref.show();

}

}

abstract class A {

abstract void show();

 {
    System.out.println("In Class A");
 }
}

class B extends A {

void show() {
    System.out.println("In class B");
   }
 } 
class C extends B {

void show() {
    System.out.println("In Class C");
 }
}

In the above code abstract methods containing a definition of the method. But in books it is stated that an abstract method should contain only the declaration rather definition of that method. When i execute this program it results in the following output without any error. Please explain me how it shows the below output.

In Class A
In Class A
In class B
In Class C
8

Your abstract class does not contain a definition of the method. Your abstract class contains an abstract method, and an initializer block.

abstract class A {
    // Abstract method
    abstract void show();

    // Initializer block, completely unrelated to show
    {
        System.out.println("In Class A");
    }
}

Initializer blocks run when the object is constructed - similarly to constructors (but you can have more than one, and they can't have arguments). It's exactly the same as if you wrote:

abstract class A {
    // Abstract method
    abstract void show();

    // Constructor
    public A()
    {
        System.out.println("In Class A");
    }
}

The output comes from:

A ref;
B objB = new B(); // calls B's constructor, then A's constructor which prints "In Class A"
C objC = new C(); // calls C's constructor, then A's constructor which prints "In Class A"
ref = objB;
ref.show(); // prints "In Class B"
ref = objC;
ref.show(); // prints "In Class C"
  • @SSH what output lines? – user253751 Jul 3 '15 at 8:53
  • sir the 4 lines of output shown in the question ,each of which belongs/result of which line of code, while sir Eran has mentioned in his answer, which I was asking to confirm my assumption and understanding of your answers, its great learning for me – SSH Jul 3 '15 at 14:37
4

This abstact method has no implementation in class A:

abstract void show();

The semi-colon ends the method declaration without an implementation.

The following block is an instance initialization block (which gets executed when creating an isntance of the class, before the code of the constructor is executed), unrelated to the abstract method :

{
    System.out.println("In Class A");
}

If you tried to give an implementation to an abstract method, it would look like this and fail to compile :

abstract void show()
{
    System.out.println("In Class A");
}

As for the output you got :

In Class A // new B() causes the instance initialziation block of A to be executed before the (default) constructor of A 
In Class A // new C() causes the instance initialziation block of A to be executed before the (default) constructor of A 
In class B // first ref.show() executes B's show, since you assigned objB to ref
In Class C // second ref.show() executes C's show, since you assigned objC to ref
  • thnx alot sir, this confirms my assumption and very helpful..! – SSH Jul 3 '15 at 5:15

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