This question already has an answer here:

I have floated images and inset boxes at the top of a container using float:right (or left) many times. Recently I hit a need to float a div at the bottom right corner of another div with the normal text wrap that you get with float (text wrapped above and to the left only).

I thought this must be relatively easy even though float has no bottom value but I haven't been able to do it using a number of techniques and searching the web hasn't come up with anything other than using absolute positioning but this doesn't give the correct word wrap behaviour.

I had thought this would be a very common design but apparently it isn't. If nobody has a suggestion I'll have to break my text up into separate boxes and align the div manually but that is rather precarious and I'd hate to have to do it on every page that needs it.

EDIT: Just a note for anyone who comes here. The question linked above as a duplicate is in fact not a duplicate. The requirement that text wrap around the inset element makes it completely different. In fact, the response to the top voted answer here makes it clear why the answer in the linked question is wrong as a response to this question. Anyway, there still doesn't appear to be a general solution to this problem but some of the solutions posted here and in the linked question may work for specific cases.

marked as duplicate by BoltClock css Jan 6 '17 at 16:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 141
    I'll work on this "float to the bottom" issue just as soon as i figure out how to make something sink to the top... ;-) – Shog9 Nov 23 '08 at 1:51
  • 33
    @Shog9 conclusion: css needs a "sink" element. – gailbear Feb 23 '11 at 21:34
  • 1
    Most of the answers here disregard the requirement for text to wrap around and above the "sunk" element. But Stu's answer works (with JQuery). – Steve Bennett May 30 '12 at 8:13
  • 1
    I don't see it that funny, I would like to know how do you manage to float to the right or left in real life first.... It is totally floating in a z-axes point of view. – Whimusical Aug 8 '13 at 8:20
  • Using flexboxes - stackoverflow.com/a/27812717/2680216 – Josh Crozier Mar 5 '15 at 0:15

29 Answers 29

Set the parent div to position: relative, then the inner div to...

position: absolute; 
bottom: 0;

...and there you go :)

  • 89
    Yeah, I thought this was the way to go also but when you set the position to absolute the element no longer participates in the layout of the containing element, so there is no word wrap and the text in the bottom corner is obscured. – Stephen Martin Nov 23 '08 at 2:07
  • 1
    Maybe you could use a combination of a floated containing div with the position relative and absolute technique. – dylanfm Nov 23 '08 at 2:28
  • 1
    Setting the float to right and then applying e.g. a negative top relative position, leads to the image being pushed over/under the text render before in the container before that image. – FelixLam Jul 18 '11 at 15:48
  • 41
    This answer fails the text wrap requirement... – Steve Bennett May 30 '12 at 8:14
  • 4
    position absolute was mentioned as unacceptable solution, unfortunately – Vitaly Dec 17 '13 at 4:42

A way to make it work is the following:

  • Float your elements left like normal
  • Rotate the parent div 180 degrees using

    -moz-transform:rotate(180deg);
    -webkit-transform:rotate(180deg);
    -o-transform:rotate(180deg);
    -ms-transform:rotate(180deg);
    filter:progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.BasicImage(rotation=2);
    

    JSfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/wcneY/

  • Now rotate all the elements that float left (give them a class) 180 degrees to put them straight again. Voila! they float to the bottom.

  • 49
    For the sake of God! (I admit it is very smart.. but seriously!!!) – G.Y Aug 19 '13 at 1:48
  • This is the best solution, because you can keep the dynamic height from your content! Thanks – Jordan Morris Oct 1 '14 at 23:32
  • 2
    While it is an amazing solution, it messes up my Firefox Nightly developer tools: The div picker seems to ignore the rotated divs and everything inside them. – Traubenfuchs Oct 22 '14 at 13:05
  • Unable to wrap text around the bottom right box: all letters turn upside down, and read(?) from bottom to top. jsfiddle.net/xu8orw5L – robert4 May 30 '15 at 1:56
  • 3
    This is the devils work and I am using it immediately. – Stumblor Jan 26 '17 at 22:11
up vote 46 down vote accepted

After struggling with various techniques for a couple of days I have to say that this appears to be impossible. Even using javascript (which I don't want to do) it doesn't seem possible.

To clarify for those who may not have understood - this is what I am looking for: in publishing it is quite common to layout an inset (picture, table, figure, etc.) so that its bottom lines up with the bottom of the last line of text of a block (or page) with text flowing around the inset in a natural manner above and to the right or left depending on which side of the page the inset is on. In html/css it is trivial to use the float style to line up the top of an inset with the top of a block but to my surprise it appears impossible to line up the bottom of the text and inset despite it being a common layout task.

I guess I'll have to revisit the design goals for this item unless anyone has a last minute suggestion.

  • 6
    Nope - this is not print publishing. There are some things that are extraordinarily difficult or impossible to accomplish using just html/css. – Traingamer Nov 25 '08 at 17:28
  • 6
    <div style="clear:both"></div> in the lower div, this works. – zengr Jul 15 '10 at 0:53
  • 1
    it worked for me zengr. Thanks jsbin.com/form/9 – JuanToroMarty May 29 '13 at 1:10

I have acheived this in JQuery by putting a zero width strut element above the float right, then sizing the strut (or pipe) according to parent height minus floated child's height.

Before js kicks in I am using the position absolute approach, which works but allows text flow behind. Therefore I switch to position static to enable the strut approach. (header is the parent element, cutout is the one i want bottom right, and pipe is my strut)

$("header .pipe").each(function(){
    $(this).next(".cutout").css("position","static");       
    $(this).height($(this).parent().height()-$(this).next(".cutout").height());                                                 
});

CSS

header{
    position: relative; 
}

header img.cutout{
    float:right;
    position:absolute;
    bottom:0;
    right:0;
    clear:right
}
header .pipe{
    width:0px; 
    float:right

}

The pipe must come 1st, then the cutout, then the text in the HTML order.

  • 3
    Hey, this works. Ugly implementation: jsfiddle.net/eymwr – Steve Bennett May 30 '12 at 8:08
  • 2
    It's a lot of work and using javascript for styling is always a last-ditch fallback because it gets messed up so easily if you change your css later on. But yes, this does work, so if it's crucial to have that div line up at the bottom with word wrap: go for it. – Wytze Jun 7 '12 at 13:44
  • 1
    This worked for me, but I couldn't get it to be exact. I suppose .height() may be the culprit there. Seems when there is a lot of block-level text (like multiple divs and paragraphs) wrapping around the floating block, .height() gets a little variable depending on how the text breaks lines. – atwixtor Dec 31 '13 at 22:07
  • I went the other way and checked the width of the container (header) and the one piece of content I had to wrap around (logo) and set a max-width on the absolutely positioned content (navigation). No floats and no extra elements. Still have JS and depends on knowing what you need to wrap around. – icrf Apr 23 '15 at 21:07

This puts a fixed div at the bottom of the page and fixes to the bottom as you scroll down

#div {
    left: 0;
    position: fixed;
    text-align: center;
    bottom: 0;
    width: 100%;
}
  • 4
    This doesn't do what he's trying to do. @Timoty and @Yona got it right. – Adam May 2 '11 at 18:07
  • This did work for me... the previous top rated solutions did not. So +1 – JasonXA Nov 21 '15 at 6:06

Put the div in another div and set the parent div's style to position:relative; Then on the child div set the following CSS properties: position:absolute; bottom:0;

  • 1
    See my comment to Timothy. As you can see here: emsoft.ca/absolutebottomtest.html the word wrap doesn't work. And some of the content is obscured. – Stephen Martin Nov 23 '08 at 2:35
  • This is the perfect solution if you don't need any text inside the child div. – Aenadon May 19 '17 at 11:38

If you're okay with only the bottom-most line of the text going to the side of the block (as opposed to completely around and underneath it, which you can't do without ending the block and starting a new one), it's not impossible to float a block to one of the bottom corners of a parent block. If you put some content in a paragraph tag within a block and want to float a link to the bottom right corner of the block, put the link within the paragraph block and set it to float: right, then put in a div tag with clear: both set just underneath the end of the paragraph tag. The last div is to make sure the parent tag surrounds the floated tags.

<div class="article" style="display: block;">
    <h3>title</h3>
        <p>
            text content
            <a href="#" style="display: block;float: right;">Read More</a>
        </p>
    <div style="clear: both;"></div>
</div>

If you want the text to wrap nicely:-

.outer {
  display: table;
}

.inner {
  height: 200px;
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: bottom;
}

/* Just for styling */
.inner {
  background: #eee;
  padding: 0 20px;
}
<!-- Need two parent elements -->
<div class="outer">
  <div class="inner">
    <h3>Sample Heading</h3>
    <p>Sample Paragragh</p>
  </div>
</div>

I know that this stuff is old, but I recently ran into this problem.

use absolute position divs advice is really silly, because the whole float thing kind of loses point with absolute positions..

now, I did not find an universal solution, but in a lot of cases prople use floating divs just to display something in a row, like a series of span elements. and you can't vertically align that.

to achieve a similar effect you can do this: do not make the div float, but set it's display property to inline-block. then you can align it vertically however it pleases you. you just need to set parent's div property vertical-align to either top, bottom, middle or baseline

i hope that helps someone

  • 2
    correction: not parent's but it's vertical-align property – countersweet Sep 16 '10 at 15:20
  • No idea if this works in common situations, but with jQueryMobile it's completely non-functional. – Wytze Mar 28 '12 at 14:32
  • this is exactly what is needed for aligning the div to bottom or side by side, great help – StudioX Oct 23 '17 at 18:23

With the introduction of Flexbox, this has become quite easy without much hacking. align-self: flex-end on the child element will align it along the cross-axis.

.container {
  display: flex;
}
.bottom {
  align-self: flex-end;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="bottom">Bottom of the container</div>
</div>

Output:

.container {
  display: flex;
  /* Material design shadow */
  box-shadow: 0 2px 2px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.14), 0 3px 1px -2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 1px 5px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.12);
  height: 100px;
  width: 175px;
  padding: 10px;
  background: #fff;
  font-family: Roboto;
}
.bottom {
  align-self: flex-end;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="bottom">Bottom of the container</div>
</div>

  • You don't seem to have read the question thoroughly.. Positioning it to the bottom is easy, but that doesn't give the desired floating behaviour. – Dennis98 Aug 22 at 10:51
  • @Dennis98 Can you edit this answer? :) – Manoj Kumar Aug 22 at 17:03
  • I can't, as I unfortunately don't have an answer and don't see sth. else wrong with the answer, that would need correction. – Dennis98 Oct 11 at 21:07

I tried this scenario posted earlier also;

div {
  position: absolute; 
  height: 100px; 
  top: 100%; 
  margin-top:-100px; 
}

The absolute positioning fixes the div to the lowest part of the browser upon loading the page, but when you scroll down if the page is longer it does not scroll with you. I changed the positioning to be relative and it works perfect. The div goes straight to the bottom upon load so you won't actually see it until you get to the bottom.

div {
      position: relative;
      height:100px; /* Or the height of your image */
      top: 100%;
      margin-top: -100px;
}
  • Any way to make it work with an unknown height? Unfortunately margin-top: -100%; refers to container height I am guessing. – christian Apr 29 '14 at 22:07

I would just do a table.

<div class="elastic">
  <div class="elastic_col valign-bottom">
    bottom-aligned content.
  </div>
</div>

And the CSS:

.elastic {
  display: table;
}
.elastic_col {
  display: table-cell;
}
.valign-bottom {
  vertical-align: bottom;
}

See it in action:
http://jsfiddle.net/mLphM/1/

I tried several of these techniques, and the following worked for me, so if all else here if all else fails then try this because it worked for me :).

<style>
  #footer {
    height:30px;
    margin: 0;
    clear: both;
    width:100%;
    position: relative;
    bottom:-10;
  }
</style>

<div id="footer" >Sportkin - the registry for sport</div>

A chose this approach of @dave-kok. But it works only if the whole content suits without scrolling. I appreciate if somebody will improve

outer {
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}
.space {
    float: right;
    height: 75%;  
}
.floateable {
    width: 40%;
    height: 25%;
    float: right;
    clear: right;  
 }

Here is code http://jsfiddle.net/d9t9joh2/

  • @chilcoder Thanks clear:right was what I needed. – Enzero Dec 1 '14 at 10:45

This is now possible with flex box. Just set the 'display' of parent div as 'flex' and set the 'margin-top' property to 'auto'. This does not distort any property of both the div.

.parent {
  display: flex;
  height: 100px;
  border: solid 1px #0f0f0f;
}
.child {
  margin-top: auto;
  border: solid 1px #000;
  width: 40px;
  word-break: break-all;
}
<div class=" parent">
  <div class="child">I am at the bottom!</div>
</div>

Not sure, but a scenario posted earlier seemed to work if you use position: relative instead of absolute on the child div.

#parent {
  width: 780px;
  height: 250px;
  background: yellow;
  border: solid 2px red;
}
#child {
  position: relative;
  height: 50px;
  width: 780px;
  top: 100%;
  margin-top: -50px;
  background: blue;
  border: solid 2px green;
}
<div id="parent">
    This has some text in it.

    <div id="child">
        This is just some text to show at the bottom of the page
    </div>
</div>

And no tables...!

I had been find this solution for a long time as well. This is what I get:

align-self: flex-end;

link: https://philipwalton.github.io/solved-by-flexbox/demos/vertical-centering/ However, I can't remember from where I opened this link. Hope it helps

Pretty old question, but still ... You can float a div to the bottom of the page like this:

div{
  position: absolute; 
  height: 100px; 
  top: 100%; 
  margin-top:-100px; 
}

You can see where the magic happens. I think you could do the same for floating it to the bottom of a parent div.

  • 4
    This doesn't wrap text around it, though. Any text appears behind it. – gailbear Feb 28 '11 at 21:28
  • 3
    Yes, this is not "floated" in the CSS sense of the word. It's "moved" but not floated. – ErikE Oct 3 '13 at 23:52

If you need relative alignment and DIV's still aren't give you what you want, just use tables and set valign = "bottom" in the cell you want the content aligned to the bottom. I know it's not a great answer to your question since DIV's are supposed to replace tables, but this is what I had to do recently with an image caption and it has worked flawlessly so far.

One interesting approach is to stack a couple of right float elements on top of each other.

<div>
<div style="float:right;height:200px;"></div>
<div style="float:right;clear:right;">Floated content</div>
<p>Other content</p>
</div>

Only problem is that this only works when you know the height of the box.

Stu's answer comes the closest to working so far, but it still doesn't take into account the fact that your outer div's height may change, based on the way the text wraps inside of it. So, repositioning the inner div (by changing the height of the "pipe") only once won't be enough. That change has to occur inside of a loop, so you can continually check whether you've achieved the right positioning yet, and readjust if needed.

The CSS from the previous answer is still perfectly valid:

#outer {
    position: relative; 
}

#inner {
    float:right;
    position:absolute;
    bottom:0;
    right:0;
    clear:right
}

.pipe {
    width:0px; 
    float:right

}

However, the Javascript should look more like this:

var innerBottom;
var totalHeight;
var hadToReduce = false;
var i = 0;
jQuery("#inner").css("position","static");
while(true) {

    // Prevent endless loop
    i++;
    if (i > 5000) { break; }

    totalHeight = jQuery('#outer').outerHeight();
    innerBottom = jQuery("#inner").position().top + jQuery("#inner").outerHeight();
    if (innerBottom < totalHeight) {
        if (hadToReduce !== true) { 
            jQuery(".pipe").css('height', '' + (jQuery(".pipe").height() + 1) + 'px');
        } else { break; }
    } else if (innerBottom > totalHeight) {
        jQuery(".pipe").css('height', '' + (jQuery(".pipe").height() - 1) + 'px');
        hadToReduce = true;
    } else { break; }
}

I know it is a very old thread but still I would like to answer. If anyone follow the below css & html then it works. The child footer div will stick with bottom like glue.

<style>
        #MainDiv
        {
            height: 300px;
            width: 300px;
            background-color: Red;
            position: relative;
        }

        #footerDiv
        {
            height: 50px;
            width: 300px;
            background-color: green;
            float: right;
            position: absolute;
            bottom: 0px;
        }
    </style>


<div id="MainDiv">
     <div id="footerDiv">
     </div>
</div>

If you set the parent element as position:relative, you can set the child to the bottom setting position:absolute; and bottom:0;

#outer {
  width:10em;
  height:10em;
  background-color:blue;
  position:relative; 
}

#inner {
  position:absolute;
  bottom:0;
  background-color:white; 
}
<div id="outer">
  <div id="inner">
    <h1>done</h1>
  </div>
</div>
  

You could try using an empty element with a 1px width and floating it. Then clear the element you actually want to position and use the height of the empty element to control how far down it goes.

http://codepen.io/cssgrid/pen/KNYrey/

.invisible {
float: left;  
}

.bottom {
float: left;
padding-right: 35px;
padding-top: 30px;
clear: left;
}

simple......in the html file right....have the "footer" (or the div you want at the bottom) at the bottom. So dont do this:

<div id="container">
    <div id="Header"></div>
    <div id="Footer"></div>
    <div id="Content"></div>
    <div id="Sidebar"></div>
</div>

DO THIS: (have the footer underneath.)

<div id="container">
    <div id="Header"></div>
    <div id="Content"></div>
    <div id="Sidebar"></div>
    <div id="Footer"></div>
</div>

After doing this then you can go the css file and have the "sidebar" float to the left. then have "content" float to the right then have "footer" clear both.

that should work.did for me.

I got this to work on the first try by adding position:absolute; bottom:0; to the div ID inside the CSS. I did not add the parent style position:relative;.

It is working perfect in both Firefox and IE 8, have not tried it in IE 7 yet.

an alternative answer is the judicious use of tables and rowspan. by setting all table cells on the preceeding line (except the main content one) to be rowspan="2" you will always get a one cell hole at the bottom of your main table cell that you can always put valign="bottom".

You can also set its height to be the minimum you need for one line. Thus you will always get your favourite line of text at the bottom regardless of how much space the rest of the text takes up.

I tried all the div answers, I was unable to get them to do what I needed.

<table>
<tr>
   <td valign="top">
     this is just some random text
     <br> that should be a couple of lines long and
     <br> is at the top of where we need the bottom tag line
   </td>
   <td rowspan="2">
     this<br/>
     this<br/>
     this<br/>
     this<br/>
     this<br/>
     this<br/>
     this<br/>
     this<br/>
     this<br/>
     this<br/>
     this<br/>
     is really<br/>
     tall
  </td>
</tr>
<tr>
  <td valign="bottom">
      now this is the tagline we need on the bottom
  </td>
</tr>
</table>
  • 2
    Table based design is considered bad practice amongst most web developers. CSS is preferred for styling a page, and you can accomplish the same things in a much more semantic friendly manner. – Ktash Jan 2 '12 at 22:01
  • Tables are not very multi-format friendly (print, screen, mobile), they have no flow to them. Just offering an alternative. – cdturner Jan 4 '12 at 19:40

here is my solution:

<style>
.sidebar-left{float:left;width:200px}
.content-right{float:right;width:700px}

.footer{clear:both;position:relative;height:1px;width:900px}
.bottom-element{position:absolute;top:-200px;left:0;height:200px;}

</style>

<div class="sidebar-left"> <p>content...</p></div>
<div class="content-right"> <p>content content content content...</p></div>

<div class="footer">
    <div class="bottom-element">bottom-element-in-sidebar</div>
</div>

To put any element at the bottom of its container, just used this:

div {
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0px;
}
  • 4
    Just that and it may end up at the bottom of the screen. The parent div needs to have position: relative too. – Alexis Wilke Jan 21 '14 at 2:48

protected by Tushar Dec 23 '16 at 3:17

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