6

Consider the simple program below:

__attribute__((weak)) void weakf(void);

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
        weakf();
}

When compiling this with gcc and running it on a Linux PC, it segfaults. When running it on ARM CM0 (arm-none-eabi-gcc), the linker replace the undefined symbol by a jump to the following instruction and a nop.

Where is this behavior documented? Is there possible ways to change it through command line options? I have been through GCC and LD documentations, there is no information about that.

If I check the ARM compiler doc however, this is clearly explained.

2 Answers 2

3

man nm

I was reading some docs and happened to come across a related quote for this:

man nm

says:

"V"
"v" The symbol is a weak object. When a weak defined symbol is linked with a normal defined symbol, the normal defined symbol is used with no error. When a weak undefined symbol is linked and the symbol is not defined, the value of the weak symbol becomes zero with no error. On some systems, uppercase indicates that a default value has been specified.

"W"
"w" The symbol is a weak symbol that has not been specifically tagged as a weak object symbol. When a weak defined symbol is linked with a normal defined symbol, the normal defined symbol is used with no error. When a weak undefined symbol is linked and the symbol is not defined, the value of the symbol is determined in a system-specific manner without error. On some systems, uppercase indicates that a default value has been specified.

nm is part of Binutils, which GCC uses under the hood, so this should be canonical enough.

Then, example on your source file:

main.c

__attribute__((weak)) void weakf(void);

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
        weakf();
}

we do:

gcc -O0 -ggdb3 -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -o main.out main.c
nm main.out

which contains:

w weakf

and so it is a system-specific value. I can't find where the per-system behavior is defined however. I don't think you can do better than reading Binutils source here.

v would be fixed to 0, but that is used for undefined variables (which are objects): How to make weak linking work with GCC?

Then:

gdb -batch -ex 'disassemble/rs main' main.out

gives:

Dump of assembler code for function main:
main.c:
4       {
   0x0000000000001135 <+0>:     55      push   %rbp
   0x0000000000001136 <+1>:     48 89 e5        mov    %rsp,%rbp
   0x0000000000001139 <+4>:     48 83 ec 10     sub    $0x10,%rsp
   0x000000000000113d <+8>:     89 7d fc        mov    %edi,-0x4(%rbp)
   0x0000000000001140 <+11>:    48 89 75 f0     mov    %rsi,-0x10(%rbp)

5               weakf();
   0x0000000000001144 <+15>:    e8 e7 fe ff ff  callq  0x1030 <weakf@plt>
   0x0000000000001149 <+20>:    b8 00 00 00 00  mov    $0x0,%eax

6       }
   0x000000000000114e <+25>:    c9      leaveq 
   0x000000000000114f <+26>:    c3      retq   
End of assembler dump.

which means it gets resolved at the PLT.

Then since I don't fully understand PLT, I experimentally verify that it resolves to address 0 and segfaults:

gdb -nh -ex run -ex bt main.out

I'm supposing the same happens on ARM, it must just set it to 0 as well.

1

On ARM with gcc this code does not work for me (test on armv7 with gcc Debian 4.6.3-14+rpi1). It looks like the arm compiler toolchain has a different behavior.

I do not found useful documentation for this behavior. It seems that the weakf equals NULL if it's undefine at link time.

So I sugest you to test it:

if (weakf == NULL) printf ("weakf not found\n");
else weakf();
2
  • I am looking for the official behavior from the doc, not for any workaround
    – calandoa
    Jul 3, 2015 at 17:34
  • I know but this feature is not a part of the C standard and its look like many GCC's features not enough documented. gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/… ` weak The weak attribute causes the declaration to be emitted as a weak symbol rather than a global. This is primarily useful in defining library functions that can be overridden in user code, though it can also be used with non-function declarations. Weak symbols are supported for ELF targets, and also for a.out targets when using the GNU assembler and linker. `
    – Gnukos
    Jul 3, 2015 at 17:40

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