1

I am maintaining software that unfortunatelly has to run on IE8. The problem with IE8 is that it throws the 'script unresponsive' error if the synchronouse execution is too long:

This message displays when Internet Explorer reaches the maximum number of synchronous instructions for a piece of JavaScript. as described here

The standard way of dealing with this is something like

setTimeout(function(){ //slow code }, 1);

but, in my case the slow part is actually:

jQuery(/*selectors*/).each()// iteration

How can I terate through the elements found with jQuery().each(), where the actual .each() part is carried out recursively with timeouts? Even if the each() block does nothing I still get the pop-up warning. There is about 20,000 elements to iterate through... I know...

What is the best way to do it without rewriting anything on the page (let's assume I really can't rewrite the 20,000 elements table).

2

FYI, if your problem actually occurs because this operation all by itself:

jQuery(selectors)

takes too long, then you will have to change the selector to be something that is much faster to evaluate or change the HTML somehow so you can query for pieces of the table at a time. jQuery in IE8 is likely using the Sizzle library to evaluate the selector so if you've got a combination of large HTML, selector and Sizzle that are just too slow for IE8, then you will have to change one of the three.

We can't help with specifics on this issue without seeing the actual HTML and probably having some sort of test bed to experiment with. My guess would be that there could be a better selector, perhaps using natively supported query mechanisms such as getElementsByTagName() or something like that, but we'd have to see that actual HTML to make a more concrete recommendation. As you already know 20,000 elements in a really slow browser is just a bad recipe to start with.


If you get through the selector find and just want help with the iteartion, you can't use .each() directly because it will run all at once. Instead, you will have to manually iterate the jQuery list of DOM objects.

function processLargeArray(items) {
    // set check size to whatever number of items you can process at once
    var chunk = 100;
    var index = 0;
    function doChunk() {
        var cnt = chunk;
        while (cnt-- && index < items.length) {

            // process items.eq(index) here

            ++index;
        }
        if (index < items.length) {
            // set Timeout for async iteration
            setTimeout(doChunk, 1);
        }
    }    
    doChunk();    
}

var data = jQuery(selectors);
processLargeArray(data);

FYI, this code is adapted for use with a jQuery object from a more general purpose answer on the subject: Best way to iterate over an array without blocking the UI


And here's a version that uses a jQuery plugin to create a similar interface to .each() (but it's async).

jQuery.fn.eachChunk = function(chunk, eachFn, completeFn) {
    var index = 0;
    var obj = this;
    function next() {
        var temp;
        if (index < obj.length) {
            temp = obj.slice(index, index + chunk);
            temp.each(eachFn);
            index += chunk;
            setTimeout(next, 1);
        } else {
            if (completeFn) {
                completeFn();
            }
        }
    }
    next();
    return this;
};

jQuery(selectors).eachChunk(100, yourFn);

  • Thanks, this is exactly what we were looking for! – bjedrzejewski Jul 3 '15 at 16:29
1

I really like the Async Library:

https://github.com/caolan/async

which gives you a whole bunch of options of running sequential, asynchronous functions.

async.each([..], function(callback){
     // Iterator function      
     callback();
});

Works in the same way as jQuery's each, but unlike jQuery, you get more control, such as:

 async.eachSeries([...], function(callback){
   // Will handle each element one at a time
     callback();
 });

And async.eachLimit, which means you cancontrol the number of tasks being run at any given time -so that x number of tasks are being run in parallel at any given time;

So, for example:

async.eachLimit([...], 2, function(callback){
  // This will run the tasks simultaneously

  callback();
   });

Will run the iterator functions over all the elements in the array, but will limit the number of concurrently running tasks to 2. If you want 4 tasks, just change the second argument to 4, etc...

So, for example:

async.eachLimit([...], 2, function(callback){
  // This will run up to 2 tasks simulatenously


  callback();   // If successfull


   });

If you need a timeout to make the operation fail silently after a timeout (jobs that pass the time out just don't get finished, and the rest of the queue moves on.

async.eachLimit([...], 2, function(callback){
  // This will run up to 2 tasks simulatenously


  callback();   // If successfull

  setTimeout(function(){
         return callback();
      }, timeoutLength);


   });

If you need a timeout to make the operation fail un-silently, (if there's one error, everything will stop).

async.eachLimit([...], 2, function(callback){
  // This will run up to 2 tasks simulatenously


  callback();   // If successfull

  setTimeout(function(){
         return callback("Error");
      }, timeoutLength);


   });

I'm not sure what the exact requirements of your job are, but I think the async library is a good candidate for this kind of stuff, and has a lot of control flow flexibility to get your job done.

  • So, this appears to be a tutorial on the async library, but it does not offer a directly coded solution to the OP's issue. – jfriend00 Jul 3 '15 at 16:24
  • Without more detail on the specific function being called for "each", I can't offer a directly coded solution. The OP seemed to be have a general control flow problem, so I posted a general control flow solution – sam Jul 3 '15 at 16:26
  • Useful for other projects so +1, by jfriend00 offerend me a perfect solution. – bjedrzejewski Jul 3 '15 at 16:28
  • 1
    You could have shown coding using the async library to do chunked iteration of a jQuery object. No more information is needed in order to write that code. That would have been a direct coded answer to the question. The function being called in .each() is a generic callback function which you could have shown just like the other answer did. – jfriend00 Jul 3 '15 at 16:31
0

This is one jQuery's way using each loop:

(function () { //avoid global var for test
    var $elems = $('selector'), // elements to iterate
        chunk = 50; //number of elements before stoping iteration
    (function doStuff() { //recursive method
        $elems.each(function (i) {               
            //delaying method when needed
            if (i && !(i%chunk)) {
                $elems = $elems.slice(i);
                setTimeout(doStuff, 1);
                return false;
            }
            //do slow stuff HERE
            //...
        });
    })();
})();

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