79

In Rust (like most programming languages), the % operator performs the remainder operation, not the modulus operation. These operations have different results for negative numbers:

-21 modulus 4 => 3
-21 remainder 4 => -1
println!("{}", -21 % 4); // -1

However, I want the modulus.

I found a workaround ((a % b) + b) % b, but I don't want to reinvent the wheel if there's already a function for that!

3
  • 1
    Any reason to use the term modulus instead of modulo (which is more common AFAICS).
    – ideasman42
    Jan 2 '17 at 8:33
  • 2
    They might have studied somewhere where the term modulus is used, not knowing that different institutions tend to differ in vocabulary.
    – OliverUv
    Dec 24 '17 at 19:32
  • For powers of two, you can do something like -21 & (4 - 1), granted it's an integer.
    – AldaronLau
    Aug 14 '20 at 22:45
47

RFC 2196 adds a couple of integer methods related to euclidian division. Specifically, the rem_euclid method (example link for i32) is what you are searching for:

println!("{}", -1i32 % 4);                // -1
println!("{}", (-21i32).rem_euclid(4));   // 3

This method is available in rustc 1.38.0 (released on 2019-09-27) and above.

1
  • 2
    They are also implemented for unsigned variants, although it is not possible to figure out what they do from that documentation. I would also mention div_euclid() for completeness. But this should be the selected answer anyway.
    – nert
    May 10 '20 at 11:50
37

Is there a modulus (not remainder!) function / operation in Rust?

As far as I can tell, there is no modular arithmetic function.

This also happens in C, where it is common to use the workaround you mentioned: ((a % b) + b) % b.

In C, C++, D, C#, F# and Java, % is in fact the remainder. In Perl, Python or Ruby, % is the modulus.

Language developers don't always go the "correct mathematical way", so computer languages might seem weird from the strict mathematician view. The thing is that both modulus and remainder, are correct for different uses.

Modulus is more mathematical if you like, while the remainder (in the C-family) is consistent with common integer division satisfying: (a / b) * b + a % b = a; this is adopted from old Fortran. So % is better called the remainder, and I suppose Rust is being consistent with C.

You are not the first to note this:

7
  • 3
    I, as a C/C++ programmer, am embarrassed that I didn't know that % works in C that way, too...
    – Kapichu
    Jul 3 '15 at 16:08
  • 3
    Isn't this a gap in Rust?
    – Kapichu
    Jul 3 '15 at 16:09
  • 2
    I'll go with % being the remainder, but not having support for modulus sucks...
    – Kapichu
    Jul 3 '15 at 16:24
  • 6
    @JosEduSol As I write this, the answer above shows (a % b) + b as a way to calculate the modulus, but I'm pretty sure what you meant to write is this: ((a % b) + b) % b.
    – David J.
    Nov 21 '18 at 1:58
  • 3
    (a / b) * b + a mod b = a is satisfied if / rounds toward -∞.
    – Vaelus
    Oct 4 '19 at 14:46
10

No, Rust doesn't have a built in modulus, see this discussion for some reasons why.

Here's an example that might be handy:

///
/// Modulo that handles negative numbers, works the same as Python's `%`.
///
/// eg: `(a + b).modulo(c)`
///
pub trait ModuloSignedExt {
    fn modulo(&self, n: Self) -> Self;
}
macro_rules! modulo_signed_ext_impl {
    ($($t:ty)*) => ($(
        impl ModuloSignedExt for $t {
            #[inline]
            fn modulo(&self, n: Self) -> Self {
                (self % n + n) % n
            }
        }
    )*)
}
modulo_signed_ext_impl! { i8 i16 i32 i64 }
1
  • Would modulo_signed_ext_impl! { i8 i16 i32 i64 isize u8 u16 u32 u64 usize } be better? Aug 25 '20 at 23:30
-1

From the other answers I constructed:

fn n_mod_m <T: std::ops::Rem<Output = T> + std::ops::Add<Output = T> + Copy>
  (n: T, m: T) -> T {
    ((n % m) + m) % m
}

assert_eq!(n_mod_m(-21, 4), 3);
2

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.