2

I think I understand the idea behind Swift optionals, i.e. a property with a non optional type represents a MUST HAVE while a property with an optional type is a MAY HAVE, but it seems to me that it's one of those features, like mandatory exception handling or mandatory indentation, that while great in theory have some unintended practical consequences. This the situation I'm facing. I'm creating a medical application to assess cognitive abilities. The test is administered to a patient by a provider and it consists of, let's say, 10 different activities. The data model of the application is a simple class Test that collects the results of the activities. Each activity has its own class, so do the patient and the provider. The business logic rules that all the activities must be completed or the test is invalid, and the patient and the provider are obviously mandatory. The natural definition for the class Test would be

 class Test {
    var provider: Provider
    var patient: Patient
    var activity1: Activity1
    var activity2: Activity2
    ...
    var activity10: Activity10
    }

Now the problem is that to create an instance of class Test, I need to have all the results for all the activities; in practice I have to carry over all the individual instances of Provider, Patient and the activities and only at the completion of the test create the instance of Test, this is of course impractical. So, for practical purposes, all the properties of Test can be made optional and the class is populated incrementally, but now the class Test doesn't represent the data model faithfully; moreover, any access to the properties must be unwrapped. One option would be to create a non-optional array of activities that can grow incrementally, but once again the class wouldn't represent the intentions of the data model. Finally, one can create a "sister class" PartialTest, with all optional properties, and when PartialTest is fully populated create an instance of Test. Still it seems an overkill.

So, am I misinterpreting the role of optionals in Swift? If not, is there any practical way to keep the class Test as it should be?

4

You could do something like:

class Test {
    var provider: Provider
    var patient: Patient
    var activity1: Activity1! = nil
    var activity2: Activity2! = nil
    // ...
    var activity10: Activity10! = nil

    var isComplete: Bool {
        return activity1 != nil
            && activity2 != nil
            // ...
            && activity10 != nil
    }
}

... and then only access activities in the test when it has isComplete == true, I think the design can be conceptually improved.

But generally I would reconsider design to get away from restraining myself with a hardcoded set of activities in the Test class. E.g.:

protocol Activity {
    var isMandatory: Bool { get }
    var isComplete: Bool { get }
}

struct Activity1: Activity {
    let isMandatory: Bool

    var result1: Int! = nil

    var isComplete: Bool {
        return result1 != nil
    }

    init(isMandatory: Bool) {
        self.isMandatory = isMandatory
    }
}

class Test {
    var provider: Provider
    var patient: Patient
    var activities: [Activity] = [
        Activity1(isMandatory: true)
        // ...
    ]

    var isComplete: Bool {
        return activities.reduce(true) {
            $0 && $1.isComplete
        }
    }
}

... or some sort of even better approach.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.