3

I am trying to deal with a known problem in docker-compose order of containers boot, so I ended with a simple solution, having a script to check if the environment is ready to start the command.

That is the idea, having some environment variable defined to the container:

  • WAIT_COMMAND should be a string defining a logical test in sh script which has to return a boolean
  • START_CMD a string with a command to run depending on the WAIT_COOMAND result, otherwise try again until LOOPS is reached.
  • LOOPS how many times to try
  • SLEEP how much to sleep between tryings

In that example I am waiting the elasticSearch to respond before starting my application which depends on ES data to boot.

The following script will be my ENTRYPOINT on docker container.

Exported ENV vars

WAIT_COMMAND="$(curl --write-out %{http_code} --silent --output /dev/null http://elastic:9200/_cat/health?h=st) == 200"
LOOPS=3
START_CMD="python my_script_depending_on_elastic.py"
SLEEP=2

Having the above ENV vars available the script should wait until the ES request returns a code 200

#!/bin/bash

is_ready() {
    eval $WAIT_COMMAND
}

# wait until is ready
i=0
while ! is_ready; do
    i=`expr $i + 1`
    if [ $i -ge $LOOPS ]; then
        echo "$(date) - still not ready, giving up"
        exit 1
    fi
    echo "$(date) - waiting to be ready"
    sleep $SLEEP
done

#start the script
exec $START_CMD

The problem is that the code does not works in the line of is_ready function, it does not returns a boolean but tries to execute 200 as a command

# ./wait_elastic.sh 
./wait_elastic.sh: line 9: 200: command not found
Fri Jul  3 18:26:43 UTC 2015 - waiting to be ready
./wait_elastic.sh: line 9: 200: command not found
Fri Jul  3 18:26:45 UTC 2015 - waiting to be ready
./wait_elastic.sh: line 9: 200: command not found
Fri Jul  3 18:26:47 UTC 2015 - still not ready, giving up

How can I do the test to check if the curl response is ok?

How to specify a logical test command as:

WAIT_COMMAND="$(curl --write-out %{http_code} --silent --output /dev/null http://elastic:9200/_cat/health?h=st) == 200"

and how to evaluate it:

is_ready() {
    eval $WAIT_COMMAND
}

?

2
  • BashFAQ #50 -- mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/050 -- is directly on-point. Jul 3, 2015 at 18:42
  • 1
    As an aside, I'd also consider using modern math syntax: i=$(( i + 1 )); if (( i >= LOOPS )); etc. $(( )) is present in the POSIX standard; (( )) is a bash/ksh/zsh extension. Jul 3, 2015 at 19:12

3 Answers 3

3

This answer is bad practice. Please consider an approach which doesn't involve eval instead.

wait_command='[ $(curl --write-out %{http_code} --silent --output /dev/null http://elastic:9200/_cat/health?h=st) = 200 ]'
is_ready() {
  eval "$wait_command"
}

Differences from original code:

  • Actually includes test command synonym [ inside of the environment variable being evaluated (prior version was not legitimate bash comparison syntax).
  • Switches from == (which is not a valid operator in POSIX [) to = (which is permitted by POSIX). See the standards document for the test command.
  • Switches from double-quotes to single-quotes at assignment time, such that curl isn't run until eval is called.
  • Quotes the content passed to eval to prevent string-splitting and glob expansion from taking place before the code reaches the eval command.

Implementing this in the context of docker-compose might look like the following:

app:
    command: docker/wait
    environment:
        - wait_command=[ $(curl --write-out %{http_code} --silent --output /dev/null http://elastic:9200/_cat/health?h=st) = 200 ]
        - wait_loops=10
        - wait_sleep=30

...with a script something like the following:

#!/bin/bash
s_ready() { eval "$wait_command"; }

# wait until is ready
i=0
while ! is_ready; do
    if (( ++i >= wait_loops )); then
        echo "$(date) - still not ready, giving up"
        exit 1
    fi
    echo "$(date) - waiting to be ready"
    sleep $wait_sleep
done
8
  • Thanks! I know this is bad to use eval, but until docker-compose team dont fix the issue of having a WAIT parameter I will use this. Thanks Jul 3, 2015 at 19:01
  • 1
    I modified my other answer to demonstrate a representation of an exported function in YAML for use by docker-compose. Please do consider it. Jul 3, 2015 at 19:03
  • I added that notes to the question Jul 3, 2015 at 19:21
  • Indeed. (As an aside -- most of the time, editing questions to include an answer is frowned on here; if the accepted answer isn't good enough to help someone else with the same problem, the general approach is either to edit it to improve it, or to add another answer -- and indeed, for the person who asked a question to add their own answer if their real fix differs in a substantial way from any of the other answers on offer is encouraged. In terms of why this is encouraged -- the idea is that the OP's own answer should be subject to upvoting/downvoting same as any other). Jul 3, 2015 at 19:24
  • OK, copied from question to this answer! Jul 3, 2015 at 22:09
2

If you want to store code, don't use a scalar variable -- use a function; that's what they're for.

If you want to pass code through an environment variable, then the answer is an exported function:

wait_command() {
  [ $(curl --write-out %{http_code} --silent --output /dev/null http://elastic:9200/_cat/health?h=st) = 200 ]
}
export -f wait_command

...creates an environment variable that looks like the following (in modern, post-official-shellshock-patch bash):

BASH_FUNC_wait_command%%=() {  [ $(curl --write-out %{http_code} --silent --output /dev/null http://elastic:9200/_cat/health?h=st) = 200 ]

...which you can just run like so, with no eval:

wait_command

To restate again, a bit more clearly: Exported functions are just environment variables with special names and values. If you create an environment variable whose name starts with BASH_FUNC_ and ends with %%, and whose value starts with () {, you just created an exported function, which will be available to run in shells started with it in the environment.


Thus, in your .yml file, you can use something like this:

environment: {BASH_FUNC_wait_command%%: '() {  [ $(curl --write-out %{http_code} --silent
    --output /dev/null http://elastic:9200/_cat/health?h=st) = 200 ]'}
2
  • docker-compose allows me to export env_vars, I am not sure it I can define a function inside the docker-compose.yml parameters Jul 3, 2015 at 18:43
  • This is my point: Exported functions are nothing but environment variables with special names (starting with BASH_FUNC_ and ending with %%) and values (starting with () {). If you can create an arbitrary environment variable, you can create an exported function. Jul 3, 2015 at 18:43
1

Don't use eval. Instead, just get the status

status=$(curl --write-out %{http_code} --silent --output /dev/null http://elastic:9200/_cat/health?h=st)"

then test it directly.

is_ready () {
    [[ $status -eq 200 ]]
}
5
  • I need the test to be in the WAIT_COMMAND as a string in environment variable: WAIT_COMMAND="$(curl --write-out %{http_code} --silent --output /dev/null elastic:9200/_cat/health?h=st) -eq 200" How to evaluate that code inside the is_ready function? Jul 3, 2015 at 18:37
  • @rochacbruno, that's not an environment variable, it's just a regular shell variable. And since it's neither an environment variable nor a shell built-in, you shouldn't be naming it with all caps. Jul 3, 2015 at 18:37
  • @CharlesDuffy I know, but when exported by the docker-compose it will be available as an ENV VAR Jul 3, 2015 at 18:38
  • Ahh! This is useful context in terms of understanding why you want to do things the way you proposed. (Not that that approach is correct -- this is what exported functions are for). Jul 3, 2015 at 18:39
  • I edited the question separating the VARS to be more clear.. thanks Jul 3, 2015 at 18:40

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