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In SQL Server 2012 I have a table with an nvarchar column with collation Latin1_General_100_CI_AS_SC, which is supposed to support unicode surrogate pair characters, or supplementary characters.

  1. When I run this query:

    select KeyValue from terms where KeyValue = N'➰'
    

    (above is a Unicode SC)
    above is a curly loop character with code 10160 (x27B0)
    The result is hundreds of different looking single character entries, even though they all have different UTF-16 codepoints. Is this due to collation? Why isn't there an exact match?

    EDIT: I now think this is due to collation. There seems to be a group of "undefined" characters in the UTF-16 range, more than 1733 characters, and they are treated as the same by this collation. Although, characters with codes above 65535 are treated as unique and those queries return exact matches.

  2. The two queries below have different results:

    select KeyValue from terms where KeyValue = N'π'
    

    returns 3 rows: π and ℼ and ᴨ

    select KeyValue from terms where KeyValue LIKE N'π'
    

    returns 2 rows: π and ℼ

    Why is this?

  3. This is the weirdest of all. This query:

    select KeyValue from terms where KeyValue like N'➰%'
    

    returns ALMOST ALL records in the table, which has many multiple character regular latin character set terms like "8w" or "apple". 90% of those not being returned are starting with "æ". What is happening?

NOTE: Just to give this a bit of context, these are all Wikipedia article titles, not random strings.

  • Is the database collation SC-aware? It will affect string literals in your queries. – Roger Wolf Jul 3 '15 at 21:19
  • @RogerWolf Database's default collation is same, if that is what you mean. – Rahmi Aksu Jul 3 '15 at 21:27
  • How is KeyValuedefined? nvarchar(x), I assume ? or varchar(x)? – SQL Police Jul 3 '15 at 21:47
  • Very interesting question. Upvote. – SQL Police Jul 3 '15 at 21:51
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    Here's an odd thing ... the character from your first query is CURLY LOOP (U+27B0). This character should not require a surrogate pair, and so the "SC" collation should be irrelevant. Am I missing something? – David Dubois Jul 4 '15 at 23:18
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SQL Server and thus tempdb also have their own collation, and they may not be the same as a database's or a column's collation. While character literals should be assigned the default collation of the column or database, the above (perhaps overly simplified) T-SQL examples could be misstating/not revealing the true problem. For example, an ORDER BY clause could have been omitted for the sake of simplicity. Are expected results returned when above statements explicitly use https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms184391.aspx ('COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AS_SC')?

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I have a table with an nvarchar column with collation Latin1_General_100_CI_AS_SC, which is supposed to support Unicode surrogate pair characters, or supplementary characters.

The Supplementary Character-Aware (SCA) collations — those ending with _SC or with _140_ in their names — do support supplementary characters. BUT, "support" only means that the built-in functions handle the surrogate pair as a single, supplementary code point instead a pair of surrogate code points. But support for sorting and comparison of supplementary characters actually started in SQL Server 2005 with the introduction of the version 90 collations.

even though they all have different UTF-16 codepoints. Is this due to collation? Why isn't there an exact match?

  1. UTF-16 doesn't have code points, it is an encoding that encodes all Unicode code points.
  2. Yes, this behavior is due to collation.
  3. There is no exact match because (as you guessed), code point U+27B0 has no defined sort weight. Hence it is completely ignored and equates to an empty string or any other code point that has no sort weight.

There seems to be a group of "undefined" characters in the UTF-16 range, more than 1733 characters, and they are treated as the same by this collation.

Correct, though some only have a sort weight due to the accent sensitivity of the collation. You would get even more matches if you used Latin1_General_100_CI_AI_SC. And, to be clear, the UTF-16 "range" is all 1,114,112 Unicode code points.

The two queries below have different results ... Why is this?

I can't (yet!) explain why = vs LIKE returns different sets of matches, but there is 1 more character that equates to the 3 that you currently have:

SELECT KeyValue, CONVERT(VARBINARY(40), [KeyValue])
FROM (VALUES (N'π' COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AS_SC), (N'ℼ'), (N'ᴨ'),
             (N'Π')) t([KeyValue])
WHERE KeyValue = N'π'; -- 4 rows

SELECT KeyValue, CONVERT(VARBINARY(40), [KeyValue])
FROM (VALUES (N'π' COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AS_SC), (N'ℼ'), (N'ᴨ'),
             (N'Π')) t([KeyValue])
WHERE KeyValue LIKE N'π'; -- 3 rows

This is the weirdest of all. This query: ... returns ALMOST ALL records in the table


SELECT 1 WHERE NCHAR(0x27B0) = NCHAR(0x0000) COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AS_SC;
-- 1

SELECT 2 WHERE NCHAR(0x27B0) = N'' COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AS_SC;
-- 2

SELECT 3 WHERE NCHAR(0x27B0) = NCHAR(0x27B0) + NCHAR(0x27B0) + NCHAR(0x27B0)
           COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AS_SC;
-- 3

SELECT 4 WHERE N'➰' = N'➰   ➰    ➰    ➰' COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AS_SC;
-- 4

SELECT 5 WHERE N'➰' LIKE N'➰   ➰    ➰    ➰' COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AS_SC;
-- NO ROWS RETURNED!!  (spaces matter here due to LIKE)

SELECT 6 WHERE N'➰' LIKE N'➰➰➰➰➰➰' COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AS_SC;
-- 6

This, again, has something to do with the fact that "➰" has no sort weight defined. Of course, neither does æ, Þ, ß, LJ, etc.

I will update this answer once I figured out exactly what LIKE is doing differently than =.

For more info, please see:

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