66

I am working with some code that has 3 levels of class inheritance. From the lowest level derived class, what is the syntax for calling a method 2 levels up the hierarchy, e.g. a super.super call? The "middle" class does not implement the method I need to call.

3
  • 9
    Why do you need that? A single super() call should suffice, unless you have overwritten the method in the middle class , in which case the middle class should take care of calling the super()'s method right? Jul 5, 2015 at 16:00
  • 2
    If the middle class does not implement that method just call super().<method>() it should work , because by inheritence your middle class would inherit the methods from the super class Jul 5, 2015 at 16:05
  • 2
    Do you mean you want to skip an implementation in the MRO?
    – jonrsharpe
    Jul 5, 2015 at 16:05

5 Answers 5

81

Well, this is one way of doing it:

class Grandparent(object):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Grandparent"

class Parent(Grandparent):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Parent"

class Child(Parent):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Hello Grandparent"
        Grandparent.my_method(self)

Maybe not what you want, but it's the best python has unless I'm mistaken. What you're asking sounds anti-pythonic and you'd have to explain why you're doing it for us to give you the happy python way of doing things.

Another example, maybe what you want (from your comments):

class Grandparent(object):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Grandparent"

class Parent(Grandparent):
    def some_other_method(self):
        print "Parent"

class Child(Parent):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Hello Grandparent"
        super(Child, self).my_method()

As you can see, Parent doesn't implement my_method but Child can still use super to get at the method that Parent "sees", i.e. Grandparent's my_method.

10
  • I don't think you can do nested super calls anyway because the type would be super. Jul 5, 2015 at 16:02
  • In my case the Parent class does not implement my_method, and I don't want to add it just for the sake of getting the child call to work.
    – SeanLabs
    Jul 5, 2015 at 16:05
  • 4
    You don't need to, middle class inherits methods from parent classes, so doing super().method() would work. Jul 5, 2015 at 16:06
  • Is the 1st method or 2nd method preferred? Are there any cases where they won't have the same behaviour? Aug 28, 2017 at 5:00
  • 2
    @information_interchange Well, generally it's a pretty bad idea to use the first method. I only gave it because I thought it was what was being asked for. The second method is by far preferred. You should not be trying to skip through a higher class if you can help it.
    – CrazyCasta
    Aug 28, 2017 at 18:42
74

This works for me:

class Grandparent(object):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Grandparent"

class Parent(Grandparent):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Parent"

class Child(Parent):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Hello Grandparent"
        super(Parent, self).my_method()
3
  • 17
    This is probably the answer that must be marked as the right answer
    – nesdis
    Feb 8, 2018 at 3:08
  • 7
    This isn't the best answer because this solution wouldn't work for situations with higher order ancestors. The child class method is hard-coding the call to the Parent's super class. CrazyCasta's first answer, although bad practice, is the right answer to this question. Apr 2, 2019 at 9:38
  • 4
    @TusharVazirani On the other hand, this is the right approach if you specifically want to skip Parent, and want the method from the first class before that, whatever it may be.
    – oulenz
    Dec 12, 2019 at 15:29
7

If you want two levels up, why not just do

class GrandParent(object):                                                       

    def act(self):                                                               
        print 'grandpa act'                                                      

class Parent(GrandParent):                                                       

    def act(self):                                                               
        print 'parent act'                                                       

class Child(Parent):                                                             

    def act(self):                                                               
        super(Child.__bases__[0], self).act()                                    
        print 'child act'                                                        


instance = Child()                                                               
instance.act()

# Prints out
# >>> grandpa act
# >>> child act      

You can add something defensive like checking if __bases__ is empty or looping over it if your middle classes have multiple inheritance. Nesting super doesn't work because the type of super isn't the parent type.

1
  • 1
    To my opinion, this should be accepted as the best answer. Slight improvement suggestion: Instead of super(Child.__bases__[0], self).act() one could also use super(type(self).__bases__[0], self).act(), avoiding hard coding the class name of Child. Dec 29, 2020 at 19:14
0

You can do this by following ways

class Grandparent(object):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Grandparent"

class Parent(Grandparent):
    def my_other_method(self):
        print "Parent"

class Child(Parent):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Inside Child"
        super(Child, self).my_method()

In this case Child will call base class my_method but base class my_method is not present there so it will call base class of parent class my_method in this way we can call my_method function of grandparent

Another Way

class Grandparent(object):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Grandparent"

class Parent(Grandparent):
    def my_other_method(self):
        print "Parent"

class Child(Parent):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Inside Child"
        super(Parent, self).my_method()

In this way we are directly calling function base class my_method function of the parent class

Another way but not pythonic way

class Grandparent(object):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Grandparent"

class Parent(Grandparent):
    def my_other_method(self):
        print "Parent"

class Child(Parent):
    def my_method(self):
        print "Inside Child"
        Grandparent.my_method()

In this way we are directly calling my_method function by specifying the class name.

1
  • 10
    Never, ever, EVER use self.__class__ in super(). Not even to get at the bases. self.__class__ is not always the class on which you defined the method, it could be a subclass. If you add another two levels of inheritance, you now have an infinite loop.
    – Martijn Pieters
    May 31, 2017 at 13:01
0

Made and tested in python 3

class Vehicle:

    # Initializer / Instance Attributes
    def __init__(self, name, price):
        self.name = name
        self.price = price

    # instance's methods
    def description(self):
        print("\nThe car {} has a price of {} eur".format(self.name, self.price))
#Object Vehicle

m3 = Vehicle("BMW M3", 40000)

m3.description()

class Camper(Vehicle):

     def __init__(self,nome,prezzo,mq):
         super().__init__(nome,prezzo)
         self.mq=mq

         # instance's methods

     def description(self):
         super().description()
         print("It has a dimension of",format(self.mq)+" mq")

#Camper Object(A camper is also a Vehicle)
marcopolo=Camper("Mercede MarcoPolo",80000,15)

marcopolo.description()

Output:
The car BMW M3 has a price of 40000 eur
The car Mercede MarcoPolo has a price of 80000 eur
It has a dimension of 15 mq

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.