2

Below is some simple code I am working with:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    float f = 1.66f;
    int d = (int)f;
    double g = (double)d;
    cout.precision(6);
    cout<<g<<"\n";
}

I want it to print 1.000000 but it prints only 1. But, even after upgradation of int to double, doesn't it automatically convert it to an integer value?

  • Well if you do cout << 1.0000; you ll get the same thing. – coincoin Jul 5 '15 at 21:52
  • 1
    Easy fix - cout<<g<<".000000\n"; – Captain Obvlious Jul 5 '15 at 21:52
  • Is it the problem with cout. Will it work with `printf``? – John Lui Jul 5 '15 at 21:54
  • @JonathanPotter, what does returns it means? – John Lui Jul 5 '15 at 21:57
  • @JohnLui Sorry, ignore me... – Jonathan Potter Jul 5 '15 at 21:58
7

You can add cout << std::fixed;

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    float f = 1.66f;
    int d = (int)f;
    double g = (double)d;
    cout.precision(6);
    cout << std::fixed;
    cout<<g<<"\n";
}

and you get 1.000000

Explanations (edit)

When you use std::fixed :

When floatfield is set to fixed, floating-point values are written using fixed-point notation: the value is represented with exactly as many digits in the decimal part as specified by the precision field (precision) and with no exponent part.

When you use the std::defaultfloat (the one you are using) :

When floatfield is set to defaultfloat, floating-point values are written using the default notation: the representation uses as many meaningful digits as needed up to the stream's decimal precision (precision), counting both the digits before and after the decimal point (if any).

That's why the following .000000 are considered irrevelant !
(If you had 1.00001 it would have been printed)

  • But, isn't cout.precision() and cout<<fixed<<setprecision() isn't the same thing? – John Lui Jul 5 '15 at 21:56
  • Nope see the example here the results are different – coincoin Jul 5 '15 at 21:58
  • @JohnLui: Why would they be? – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Jul 5 '15 at 23:07
1

Setprecision sets how precise the result has to, e.g.

std::cout << (1.f)/6 << std::endl;  // prints 0.166667
std::cout.precision(7);
std::cout << (1.f)/6 << std::endl;  // prints 0.1666667

But it does not require that 0's are printed out, consider:

std::cout.precision(5);
std::cout << 1.1110f << std::endl;      // prints 1.111
std::cout << 1.1111f << std::endl;      // prints 1.1111

And as coincoin suggests the solution to get 0's printed out is to use std::fixed!

  • Explains the problem but doesn't answer the question – WorldSEnder Jul 5 '15 at 22:04
  • The exact question is "doesn't it automatically convert it to an integer value", pretty meaningless, if you ask me. So you should try to solve the problem – WorldSEnder Jul 5 '15 at 22:09
  • I got it. But I just had one doubt, setprecision sets how precise the result has to be, and not how many digits have to be printed? What's the difference between the two? – John Lui Jul 5 '15 at 22:16
  • 1
    One difference as you see is that 0's need not be printed out. The other things is that some floats have a lot of digits. Setprecision sets how many digits need to be accurate, – Karlis Olte Jul 5 '15 at 22:23

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