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How can I find the location of my application's executable in WPF (C# or VB.Net)?

I've used this code with windows forms:

Application.ExecutablePath.ToString();

But with WPF I received this error from Visual Studio:

System.Window.Application does not contain a definition for ExecutablePath.

1
93

System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location should work.

1
  • 20
    This may not work properly all the times. It will get the executing assembly, not the application's executable. This means this won't work if running through a referenced DLL if you want the application's executable. Mar 9 '15 at 18:50
34

Several alternatives:

Directory.GetParent(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location)

System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory

Only in VB:

My.Application.Info.DirectoryPath
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  • 2
    System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory returns current directory, not executable location, i.e. when run from outlook (sent as a link to \\server\folder\file.exe it will set BaseDirectory to user documents instead executable location Nov 5 '15 at 9:23
19

this is useful for you: Application.ExecutablePath equals to:

Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName;
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  • 4
    This is the only thing that worked perfect for me. The alternative - GetExecutingAssembly got me the dll instead of the exe (As mentioned above), and the use of Application.ExecutablePath is not available from where I coded.
    – Guy
    Jul 9 '19 at 11:10
2

The executing assembly can be a DLL if the code is located in a library:

var executingAssembly = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly(); //MyLibrary.dll
var callingAssembly = Assembly.GetCallingAssembly(); //MyLibrary.dll
var entryAssembly = Assembly.GetEntryAssembly(); //WpfApp.exe or MyLibrary.dll

So the best way I found is (C#) :

var wpfAssembly = (AppDomain.CurrentDomain
                .GetAssemblies()
                .Where(item => item.EntryPoint != null)
                .Select(item => 
                    new {item, applicationType = item.GetType(item.GetName().Name + ".App", false)})
                .Where(a => a.applicationType != null && typeof(System.Windows.Application)
                    .IsAssignableFrom(a.applicationType))
                    .Select(a => a.item))
            .FirstOrDefault();

So in your case, you can find location of the assembly :

var location = wpfAssembly.Location;
1
  • Nice technique @scrat789. It gets to the regular .exe's assembly even when running in the debugger. None of that XXX.vshost.exe.
    – Bryan Knox
    Aug 15 '15 at 4:35
2

This is what I use. It works even in debugger.

using System.IO;
using System.Diagnostics;

public static string GetMyBinDirectory()
{
    return Path.GetDirectoryName(Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName);
}

It uses some powerfull classes, like Process and ProcessModule

2

Environment.CurrentDirectory returns parent directory of exe file

0
0

Based on others answers, here's an example that shows how to remove the executable name from the path and combine the result with some subfolder and filename:

at my updated version of Hotspotizer (http://github.com/birbilis/Hotspotizer), I've just added support for loading a Gesture Collection file at startup, if found at Library\Default.hsjson, by using the following code:

const string GESTURE_COLLECTION_LIBRARY_PATH = "Library"
const string DEFAULT_GESTURE_COLLECTION = "Default.hsjson"

//...

LoadGestureCollection(
  Path.Combine(Path.GetDirectoryName(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location),
  GESTURE_COLLECTION_LIBRARY_PATH,
  DEFAULT_GESTURE_COLLECTION));

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