I have a list of arbitrary length, and I need to split it up into equal size chunks and operate on it. There are some obvious ways to do this, like keeping a counter and two lists, and when the second list fills up, add it to the first list and empty the second list for the next round of data, but this is potentially extremely expensive.

I was wondering if anyone had a good solution to this for lists of any length, e.g. using generators.

I was looking for something useful in itertools but I couldn't find anything obviously useful. Might've missed it, though.

Related question: What is the most “pythonic” way to iterate over a list in chunks?

57 Answers 57

up vote 2311 down vote accepted
+100

Here's a generator that yields the chunks you want:

def chunks(l, n):
    """Yield successive n-sized chunks from l."""
    for i in range(0, len(l), n):
        yield l[i:i + n]

import pprint
pprint.pprint(list(chunks(range(10, 75), 10)))
[[10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19],
 [20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29],
 [30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39],
 [40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49],
 [50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59],
 [60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69],
 [70, 71, 72, 73, 74]]

If you're using Python 2, you should use xrange() instead of range():

def chunks(l, n):
    """Yield successive n-sized chunks from l."""
    for i in xrange(0, len(l), n):
        yield l[i:i + n]

Also you can simply use list comprehension instead of writing a function. Python 3:

[l[i:i + n] for i in range(0, len(l), n)]

Python 2 version:

[l[i:i + n] for i in xrange(0, len(l), n)]
  • 45
    What happens if we can't tell the length of the list? Try this on itertools.repeat([ 1, 2, 3 ]), e.g. – jespern Nov 23 '08 at 12:51
  • 32
    That's an interesting extension to the question, but the original question clearly asked about operating on a list. – Ned Batchelder Nov 23 '08 at 13:53
  • @jamylak: Hmmm, that's not was I was suggesting at all. For one thing, people were upvoting this answer based on @Ned's original yield answer, not the generator expression. I think I prefer the more explict yield version, and I think your edit makes the answer more confusing, as now there are two different options within one answer. Perhaps better to put this in a different answer. – Ben Hoyt Apr 14 '13 at 21:18
  • 2
    @jespern I guess with an infinite or indefinite-length list you go to the related question that J.F. Sebastian linked: What is the most “pythonic” way to iterate over a list in chunks? – n611x007 Apr 24 '14 at 9:19
  • 3
    this functions needs to be in the damn standard library – dgan Feb 4 at 14:19

If you want something super simple:

def chunks(l, n):
    n = max(1, n)
    return (l[i:i+n] for i in xrange(0, len(l), n))
  • 6
    Or (if we're doing different representations of this particular function) you could define a lambda function via: lambda x,y: [ x[i:i+y] for i in range(0,len(x),y)] . I love this list-comprehension method! – J-P Aug 20 '11 at 13:54
  • 3
    after return there must be [, not ( – alwbtc Jun 1 '17 at 6:45
  • 2
    @alwbtc - no it's correct it's a generator – Mr_and_Mrs_D Nov 25 '17 at 19:42
  • "Super simple" means not having to debug infinite loops -- kudos for the max(). – Bob Stein May 15 at 17:49
  • there is nothing simple about this solution – mit Oct 19 at 12:36

Directly from the (old) Python documentation (recipes for itertools):

from itertools import izip, chain, repeat

def grouper(n, iterable, padvalue=None):
    "grouper(3, 'abcdefg', 'x') --> ('a','b','c'), ('d','e','f'), ('g','x','x')"
    return izip(*[chain(iterable, repeat(padvalue, n-1))]*n)

The current version, as suggested by J.F.Sebastian:

#from itertools import izip_longest as zip_longest # for Python 2.x
from itertools import zip_longest # for Python 3.x
#from six.moves import zip_longest # for both (uses the six compat library)

def grouper(n, iterable, padvalue=None):
    "grouper(3, 'abcdefg', 'x') --> ('a','b','c'), ('d','e','f'), ('g','x','x')"
    return zip_longest(*[iter(iterable)]*n, fillvalue=padvalue)

I guess Guido's time machine works—worked—will work—will have worked—was working again.

These solutions work because [iter(iterable)]*n (or the equivalent in the earlier version) creates one iterator, repeated n times in the list. izip_longest then effectively performs a round-robin of "each" iterator; because this is the same iterator, it is advanced by each such call, resulting in each such zip-roundrobin generating one tuple of n items.

  • @ninjagecko: list(grouper(3, range(10))) returns [(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, 7, 8), (9, None, None)], and all tuples are of length 3. Please elaborate on your comment because I can't understand it; what do you call a thing and how do you define it being a multiple of 3 in “expecting your thing to be a multiple of 3”? Thank you in advance. – tzot Apr 19 '11 at 13:09
  • If it is incorrect behavior for the user's code to have a tuple with None, they need to explicitly raise an error if len('0123456789')%3 != 0. This is not a bad thing, but a thing which could be documented. Oh wait my apologies... it is documented implicitly in by the padvalue=None argument. (Also by '3' I meant 'n') Nice code. – ninjagecko Apr 19 '11 at 15:51
  • 10
    upvoted this because it works on generators (no len) and uses the generally faster itertools module. – Michael Dillon Jan 30 '12 at 23:47
  • 50
    A classic example of fancy itertools functional approach turning out some unreadable sludge, when compared to a simple and naive pure python implementation – wim Apr 12 '13 at 5:40
  • 11
    @wim Given that this answer began as a snippet from the Python documentation, I'd suggest you open an issue on bugs.python.org . – tzot Apr 12 '13 at 11:36

I know this is kind of old but I don't why nobody mentioned numpy.array_split:

lst = range(50)
In [26]: np.array_split(lst,5)
Out[26]: 
[array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]),
 array([10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19]),
 array([20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29]),
 array([30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39]),
 array([40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49])]
  • 7
    This allows you to set the total number of chunks, not the number of elements per chunk. – FizxMike Sep 9 '15 at 3:03
  • 2
    you can do the math yourself. if you have 10 elements you can group them into 2, 5 elements chunks or five 2 elements chunks – Moj Sep 9 '15 at 7:27
  • 11
    +1 This is my favorite solution, as it splits the array into evenly sized arrays, while other solutions don't (in all other solutions I looked at, the last array may be arbitrarily small). – MiniQuark Jun 28 '16 at 17:26
  • I wish I found this like 5 years ago. Thanks @Moj very useful function. – O.rka May 14 at 19:26
  • @MiniQuark but what does this do when the number of blocks isn't a factor of the original array size? – Baldrickk May 18 at 11:12

Here is a generator that work on arbitrary iterables:

def split_seq(iterable, size):
    it = iter(iterable)
    item = list(itertools.islice(it, size))
    while item:
        yield item
        item = list(itertools.islice(it, size))

Example:

>>> import pprint
>>> pprint.pprint(list(split_seq(xrange(75), 10)))
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9],
 [10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19],
 [20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29],
 [30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39],
 [40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49],
 [50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59],
 [60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69],
 [70, 71, 72, 73, 74]]

I'm surprised nobody has thought of using iter's two-argument form:

from itertools import islice

def chunk(it, size):
    it = iter(it)
    return iter(lambda: tuple(islice(it, size)), ())

Demo:

>>> list(chunk(range(14), 3))
[(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, 7, 8), (9, 10, 11), (12, 13)]

This works with any iterable and produces output lazily. It returns tuples rather than iterators, but I think it has a certain elegance nonetheless. It also doesn't pad; if you want padding, a simple variation on the above will suffice:

from itertools import islice, chain, repeat

def chunk_pad(it, size, padval=None):
    it = chain(iter(it), repeat(padval))
    return iter(lambda: tuple(islice(it, size)), (padval,) * size)

Demo:

>>> list(chunk_pad(range(14), 3))
[(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, 7, 8), (9, 10, 11), (12, 13, None)]
>>> list(chunk_pad(range(14), 3, 'a'))
[(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, 7, 8), (9, 10, 11), (12, 13, 'a')]

Like the izip_longest-based solutions, the above always pads. As far as I know, there's no one- or two-line itertools recipe for a function that optionally pads. By combining the above two approaches, this one comes pretty close:

_no_padding = object()

def chunk(it, size, padval=_no_padding):
    if padval == _no_padding:
        it = iter(it)
        sentinel = ()
    else:
        it = chain(iter(it), repeat(padval))
        sentinel = (padval,) * size
    return iter(lambda: tuple(islice(it, size)), sentinel)

Demo:

>>> list(chunk(range(14), 3))
[(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, 7, 8), (9, 10, 11), (12, 13)]
>>> list(chunk(range(14), 3, None))
[(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, 7, 8), (9, 10, 11), (12, 13, None)]
>>> list(chunk(range(14), 3, 'a'))
[(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, 7, 8), (9, 10, 11), (12, 13, 'a')]

I believe this is the shortest chunker proposed that offers optional padding.

As Tomasz Gandor observed, the two padding chunkers will stop unexpectedly if they encounter a long sequence of pad values. Here's a final variation that works around that problem in a reasonable way:

_no_padding = object()
def chunk(it, size, padval=_no_padding):
    it = iter(it)
    chunker = iter(lambda: tuple(islice(it, size)), ())
    if padval == _no_padding:
        yield from chunker
    else:
        for ch in chunker:
            yield ch if len(ch) == size else ch + (padval,) * (size - len(ch))

Demo:

>>> list(chunk([1, 2, (), (), 5], 2))
[(1, 2), ((), ()), (5,)]
>>> list(chunk([1, 2, None, None, 5], 2, None))
[(1, 2), (None, None), (5, None)]
  • 3
    Wonderful, your simple version is my favorite. Others too came up with the basic islice(it, size) expression and embedded it (like I had done) in a loop construct. Only you thought of the two-argument version of iter() (I was completely unaware of), which makes it super-elegant (and probably most performance-effective). I had no idea that the first argument to iter changes to a 0-argument function when given the sentinel. You return a (pot. infinite) iterator of chunks, can use a (pot. infinite) iterator as input, have no len() and no array slices. Awesome! – ThomasH Sep 15 '16 at 19:58
  • 1
    This is why I read down through the answers rather than scanning just the top couple. Optional padding was a requirement in my case, and I too learned about the two-argument form of iter. – Kerr Aug 16 '17 at 14:30
  • I upvoted this, but still - let's not overhype it! First of all, lambda can be bad (slow closure over it iterator. Secondly, and most importanlty - you will end prematurely if a chunk of padval actually exists in your iterable, and should be processed. – Tomasz Gandor Nov 16 at 11:34
  • @TomaszGandor, I take your first point! Although my understanding is that lambda isn't any slower than an ordinary function, of course you're right that the function call and closure look-up will slow this down. I don't know what the relative performance hit of this would be vs. the izip_longest approach, for example -- I suspect it might be a complex trade-off. But... isn't the padval issue shared by every answer here that offers a padval parameter? – senderle Nov 16 at 12:38
  • 1
    @TomaszGandor, fair enough! But it wasn't too hard to create a version that fixes this. (Also, note that the very first version, which uses () as the sentinel, does work correctly. This is because tuple(islice(it, size)) yields () when it is empty.) – senderle Nov 17 at 1:19
def chunk(input, size):
    return map(None, *([iter(input)] * size))
  • map(None, iter) equals izip_longest(iter). – Thomas Ahle Jan 29 '12 at 15:18
  • 1
    @TomaszWysocki Can you explain the * in front of you iterator tuple? Possibly in your answer text, but I have note seen that * used that way in Python before. Thanks! – theJollySin Oct 7 '13 at 18:58
  • 1
    @theJollySin In this context, it is called the splat operator. Its use is explained here - stackoverflow.com/questions/5917522/unzipping-and-the-operator. – rlms Nov 15 '13 at 21:14
  • 1
    Close but the last chunk has None elements to fill it out. This may or may not be a defect. Really cool pattern though. – user1969453 Apr 25 '14 at 1:49

Simple yet elegant

l = range(1, 1000)
print [l[x:x+10] for x in xrange(0, len(l), 10)]

or if you prefer:

chunks = lambda l, n: [l[x: x+n] for x in xrange(0, len(l), n)]
chunks(l, 10)
  • 13
    Thou shalt not dub a variable in the likeness of an Arabic number. In some fonts, 1 and l are indistinguishable. As are 0 and O. And sometimes even I and 1. – Alfe Aug 14 '13 at 23:02
  • 11
    @Alfe Defective fonts. People shouldn't use such fonts. Not for programming, not for anything. – Jerry B Oct 5 '13 at 8:14
  • 12
    Lambdas are meant to be used as unnamed functions. There is no point in using them like that. In addition it makes debugging more difficult as the traceback will report "in <lambda>" instead of "in chunks" in case of error. I wish you luck finding a problem if you have whole bunch of these :) – Chris Koston Nov 26 '13 at 19:45
  • 1
    it should be 0 and not 1 inside xrange in print [l[x:x+10] for x in xrange(1, len(l), 10)] – scottydelta Dec 28 '13 at 19:11
  • NOTE: For Python 3 users use range. – Christian Dean Aug 31 '17 at 12:32

Critique of other answers here:

None of these answers are evenly sized chunks, they all leave a runt chunk at the end, so they're not completely balanced. If you were using these functions to distribute work, you've built-in the prospect of one likely finishing well before the others, so it would sit around doing nothing while the others continued working hard.

For example, the current top answer ends with:

[60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69],
[70, 71, 72, 73, 74]]

I just hate that runt at the end!

Others, like list(grouper(3, xrange(7))), and chunk(xrange(7), 3) both return: [(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, None, None)]. The None's are just padding, and rather inelegant in my opinion. They are NOT evenly chunking the iterables.

Why can't we divide these better?

My Solution(s)

Here's a balanced solution, adapted from a function I've used in production (Note in Python 3 to replace xrange with range):

def baskets_from(items, maxbaskets=25):
    baskets = [[] for _ in xrange(maxbaskets)] # in Python 3 use range
    for i, item in enumerate(items):
        baskets[i % maxbaskets].append(item)
    return filter(None, baskets) 

And I created a generator that does the same if you put it into a list:

def iter_baskets_from(items, maxbaskets=3):
    '''generates evenly balanced baskets from indexable iterable'''
    item_count = len(items)
    baskets = min(item_count, maxbaskets)
    for x_i in xrange(baskets):
        yield [items[y_i] for y_i in xrange(x_i, item_count, baskets)]

And finally, since I see that all of the above functions return elements in a contiguous order (as they were given):

def iter_baskets_contiguous(items, maxbaskets=3, item_count=None):
    '''
    generates balanced baskets from iterable, contiguous contents
    provide item_count if providing a iterator that doesn't support len()
    '''
    item_count = item_count or len(items)
    baskets = min(item_count, maxbaskets)
    items = iter(items)
    floor = item_count // baskets 
    ceiling = floor + 1
    stepdown = item_count % baskets
    for x_i in xrange(baskets):
        length = ceiling if x_i < stepdown else floor
        yield [items.next() for _ in xrange(length)]

Output

To test them out:

print(baskets_from(xrange(6), 8))
print(list(iter_baskets_from(xrange(6), 8)))
print(list(iter_baskets_contiguous(xrange(6), 8)))
print(baskets_from(xrange(22), 8))
print(list(iter_baskets_from(xrange(22), 8)))
print(list(iter_baskets_contiguous(xrange(22), 8)))
print(baskets_from('ABCDEFG', 3))
print(list(iter_baskets_from('ABCDEFG', 3)))
print(list(iter_baskets_contiguous('ABCDEFG', 3)))
print(baskets_from(xrange(26), 5))
print(list(iter_baskets_from(xrange(26), 5)))
print(list(iter_baskets_contiguous(xrange(26), 5)))

Which prints out:

[[0], [1], [2], [3], [4], [5]]
[[0], [1], [2], [3], [4], [5]]
[[0], [1], [2], [3], [4], [5]]
[[0, 8, 16], [1, 9, 17], [2, 10, 18], [3, 11, 19], [4, 12, 20], [5, 13, 21], [6, 14], [7, 15]]
[[0, 8, 16], [1, 9, 17], [2, 10, 18], [3, 11, 19], [4, 12, 20], [5, 13, 21], [6, 14], [7, 15]]
[[0, 1, 2], [3, 4, 5], [6, 7, 8], [9, 10, 11], [12, 13, 14], [15, 16, 17], [18, 19], [20, 21]]
[['A', 'D', 'G'], ['B', 'E'], ['C', 'F']]
[['A', 'D', 'G'], ['B', 'E'], ['C', 'F']]
[['A', 'B', 'C'], ['D', 'E'], ['F', 'G']]
[[0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25], [1, 6, 11, 16, 21], [2, 7, 12, 17, 22], [3, 8, 13, 18, 23], [4, 9, 14, 19, 24]]
[[0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25], [1, 6, 11, 16, 21], [2, 7, 12, 17, 22], [3, 8, 13, 18, 23], [4, 9, 14, 19, 24]]
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [6, 7, 8, 9, 10], [11, 12, 13, 14, 15], [16, 17, 18, 19, 20], [21, 22, 23, 24, 25]]

Notice that the contiguous generator provide chunks in the same length patterns as the other two, but the items are all in order, and they are as evenly divided as one may divide a list of discrete elements.

  • You say that none of the above provides evenly-sized chunks. But this one does, as does this one. – senderle Feb 26 '14 at 15:00
  • 1
    @senderle, The first one, list(grouper(3, xrange(7))), and the second one, chunk(xrange(7), 3) both return: [(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, None, None)]. The None's are just padding, and rather inelegant in my opinion. They are NOT evenly chunking the iterables. Thanks for your vote! – Aaron Hall Feb 26 '14 at 16:07
  • 3
    You raise the question (without doing it explicitly, so I do that now here) whether equally-sized chunks (except the last, if not possible) or whether a balanced (as good as possible) result is more often what will be needed. You assume that the balanced solution is to prefer; this might be true if what you program is close to the real world (e. g. a card-dealing algorithm for a simulated card game). In other cases (like filling lines with words) one will rather like to keep the lines as full as possible. So I can't really prefer one over the other; they are just for different use cases. – Alfe Aug 2 '14 at 23:14
  • @ChristopherBarrington-Leigh Good point, for DataFrames, you should probably use slices, since I believe DataFrame objects do not usually copy on slicing, e.g. import pandas as pd; [pd.DataFrame(np.arange(7))[i::3] for i in xrange(3)] – Aaron Hall Sep 3 '14 at 17:10
  • 1
    @AaronHall Oops. I deleted my comment because I second-guessed my critique, but you were quick on the draw. Thanks! In fact, my claim that it doesn't work for dataframes is true. If items is a dataframe, just use yield items[range(x_i, item_count, baskets)] as the last line. I offered a separate (yet another) answer, in which you specify the desired (minimum) group size. – CPBL Sep 3 '14 at 17:47

I saw the most awesome Python-ish answer in a duplicate of this question:

from itertools import zip_longest

a = range(1, 16)
i = iter(a)
r = list(zip_longest(i, i, i))
>>> print(r)
[(1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6), (7, 8, 9), (10, 11, 12), (13, 14, 15)]

You can create n-tuple for any n. If a = range(1, 15), then the result will be:

[(1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6), (7, 8, 9), (10, 11, 12), (13, 14, None)]

If the list is divided evenly, then you can replace zip_longest with zip, otherwise the triplet (13, 14, None) would be lost. Python 3 is used above. For Python 2, use izip_longest.

  • that is nice if your list and chunks are short, how could you adapt this to split your list in to chunks of 1000 though? you"re not going to code zip(i,i,i,i,i,i,i,i,i,i.....i=1000) – Tom Smith May 18 '15 at 14:21
  • 8
    zip(i, i, i, ... i) with "chunk_size" arguments to zip() can be written as zip(*[i]*chunk_size) Whether that's a good idea or not is debatable, of course. – Wilson F Jun 28 '15 at 4:52
  • 1
    The downside of this is that if you aren't dividing evenly, you'll drop elements, as zip stops at the shortest iterable - & izip_longest would add default elements. – Aaron Hall Jul 8 '16 at 3:37
  • zip_longest should be used, as done in: stackoverflow.com/a/434411/1959808 – Ioannis Filippidis Jun 21 '17 at 13:28
  • The answer with range(1, 15) is already missing elements, because there are 14 elements in range(1, 15), not 15. – Ioannis Filippidis Jun 21 '17 at 13:34

If you had a chunk size of 3 for example, you could do:

zip(*[iterable[i::3] for i in range(3)]) 

source: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/303060-group-a-list-into-sequential-n-tuples/

I would use this when my chunk size is fixed number I can type, e.g. '3', and would never change.

  • 8
    This doesn't work if len(iterable)%3 != 0. The last (short) group of numbers won't be returned. – sherbang Jul 3 '12 at 19:28

If you know list size:

def SplitList(list, chunk_size):
    return [list[offs:offs+chunk_size] for offs in range(0, len(list), chunk_size)]

If you don't (an iterator):

def IterChunks(sequence, chunk_size):
    res = []
    for item in sequence:
        res.append(item)
        if len(res) >= chunk_size:
            yield res
            res = []
    if res:
        yield res  # yield the last, incomplete, portion

In the latter case, it can be rephrased in a more beautiful way if you can be sure that the sequence always contains a whole number of chunks of given size (i.e. there is no incomplete last chunk).

  • I am sad this is buried so far down. The IterChunks works for everything and is the general solution and has no caveats that I know of. – Jason Dunkelberger Aug 7 '15 at 23:31
  • All questions about the general solution (non-lists) are marked as duplicates of this question, which they are not, so I have to push this up. – Jason Dunkelberger Aug 7 '15 at 23:36

A generator expression:

def chunks(seq, n):
    return (seq[i:i+n] for i in xrange(0, len(seq), n))

eg.

print list(chunks(range(1, 1000), 10))

The toolz library has the partition function for this:

from toolz.itertoolz.core import partition

list(partition(2, [1, 2, 3, 4]))
[(1, 2), (3, 4)]
  • This looks like the simplest of all the suggestions. I am just wondering if it really can be true that one has to use a third party library to get such a partition function. I would have expected something equivalent with that partition function to exist as a language builtin. – kasperd Mar 29 '15 at 14:45
  • 1
    you can do a partition with itertools. but I like the toolz library. its a clojure-inspired library for working on collections in a functional style. you don't get immutability but you get a small vocabulary for working on simple collections. As a plus, cytoolz is written in cython and gets a nice performance boost. github.com/pytoolz/cytoolz matthewrocklin.com/blog/work/2014/05/01/Introducing-CyToolz – zach Mar 30 '15 at 15:28
  • This is the best answer. It is always good to use the best third party libraries. Who needs the cult of the pythonic anyway – mit Oct 19 at 12:42
  • The link from zach's comment works if you ommit the trailing slash: matthewrocklin.com/blog/work/2014/05/01/Introducing-CyToolz – mit Oct 19 at 12:46

I like the Python doc's version proposed by tzot and J.F.Sebastian a lot, but it has two shortcomings:

  • it is not very explicit
  • I usually don't want a fill value in the last chunk

I'm using this one a lot in my code:

from itertools import islice

def chunks(n, iterable):
    iterable = iter(iterable)
    while True:
        yield tuple(islice(iterable, n)) or iterable.next()

UPDATE: A lazy chunks version:

from itertools import chain, islice

def chunks(n, iterable):
   iterable = iter(iterable)
   while True:
       yield chain([next(iterable)], islice(iterable, n-1))

At this point, I think we need a recursive generator, just in case...

In python 2:

def chunks(li, n):
    if li == []:
        return
    yield li[:n]
    for e in chunks(li[n:], n):
        yield e

In python 3:

def chunks(li, n):
    if li == []:
        return
    yield li[:n]
    yield from chunks(li[n:], n)

Also, in case of massive Alien invasion, a decorated recursive generator might become handy:

def dec(gen):
    def new_gen(li, n):
        for e in gen(li, n):
            if e == []:
                return
            yield e
    return new_gen

@dec
def chunks(li, n):
    yield li[:n]
    for e in chunks(li[n:], n):
        yield e
  • 2
    You are the alien. Double yields? Haha nice one. +1 – PascalVKooten Mar 25 '16 at 19:28

You may also use get_chunks function of utilspie library as:

>>> from utilspie import iterutils
>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

>>> list(iterutils.get_chunks(a, 5))
[[1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [6, 7, 8, 9]]

You can install utilspie via pip:

sudo pip install utilspie

Disclaimer: I am the creator of utilspie library.

  • 1
    Looks cool. How about the performance of this lib? – Endle_Zhenbo Feb 25 '17 at 14:03

I was curious about the performance of different approaches and here it is:

Tested on Python 3.5.1

import time
batch_size = 7
arr_len = 298937

#---------slice-------------

print("\r\nslice")
start = time.time()
arr = [i for i in range(0, arr_len)]
while True:
    if not arr:
        break

    tmp = arr[0:batch_size]
    arr = arr[batch_size:-1]
print(time.time() - start)

#-----------index-----------

print("\r\nindex")
arr = [i for i in range(0, arr_len)]
start = time.time()
for i in range(0, round(len(arr) / batch_size + 1)):
    tmp = arr[batch_size * i : batch_size * (i + 1)]
print(time.time() - start)

#----------batches 1------------

def batch(iterable, n=1):
    l = len(iterable)
    for ndx in range(0, l, n):
        yield iterable[ndx:min(ndx + n, l)]

print("\r\nbatches 1")
arr = [i for i in range(0, arr_len)]
start = time.time()
for x in batch(arr, batch_size):
    tmp = x
print(time.time() - start)

#----------batches 2------------

from itertools import islice, chain

def batch(iterable, size):
    sourceiter = iter(iterable)
    while True:
        batchiter = islice(sourceiter, size)
        yield chain([next(batchiter)], batchiter)


print("\r\nbatches 2")
arr = [i for i in range(0, arr_len)]
start = time.time()
for x in batch(arr, batch_size):
    tmp = x
print(time.time() - start)

#---------chunks-------------
def chunks(l, n):
    """Yield successive n-sized chunks from l."""
    for i in range(0, len(l), n):
        yield l[i:i + n]
print("\r\nchunks")
arr = [i for i in range(0, arr_len)]
start = time.time()
for x in chunks(arr, batch_size):
    tmp = x
print(time.time() - start)

#-----------grouper-----------

from itertools import zip_longest # for Python 3.x
#from six.moves import zip_longest # for both (uses the six compat library)

def grouper(iterable, n, padvalue=None):
    "grouper(3, 'abcdefg', 'x') --> ('a','b','c'), ('d','e','f'), ('g','x','x')"
    return zip_longest(*[iter(iterable)]*n, fillvalue=padvalue)

arr = [i for i in range(0, arr_len)]
print("\r\ngrouper")
start = time.time()
for x in grouper(arr, batch_size):
    tmp = x
print(time.time() - start)

Results:

slice
31.18285083770752

index
0.02184295654296875

batches 1
0.03503894805908203

batches 2
0.22681021690368652

chunks
0.019841909408569336

grouper
0.006506919860839844
  • benchmarking using time library is not a great idea when we have timeit module – Azat Ibrakov Oct 6 at 9:24
[AA[i:i+SS] for i in range(len(AA))[::SS]]

Where AA is array, SS is chunk size. For example:

>>> AA=range(10,21);SS=3
>>> [AA[i:i+SS] for i in range(len(AA))[::SS]]
[[10, 11, 12], [13, 14, 15], [16, 17, 18], [19, 20]]
# or [range(10, 13), range(13, 16), range(16, 19), range(19, 21)] in py3

code:

def split_list(the_list, chunk_size):
    result_list = []
    while the_list:
        result_list.append(the_list[:chunk_size])
        the_list = the_list[chunk_size:]
    return result_list

a_list = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

print split_list(a_list, 3)

result:

[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9], [10]]
  • Looks nice and easy to understand. Much better then the answers before. – buhtz Aug 31 '16 at 17:03
  • Don't use list as variable/objekt name because it is a type. – buhtz Aug 31 '16 at 17:31

heh, one line version

In [48]: chunk = lambda ulist, step:  map(lambda i: ulist[i:i+step],  xrange(0, len(ulist), step))

In [49]: chunk(range(1,100), 10)
Out[49]: 
[[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10],
 [11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20],
 [21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30],
 [31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40],
 [41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50],
 [51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60],
 [61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70],
 [71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80],
 [81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90],
 [91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99]]
  • 27
    Please, use "def chunk" instead of "chunk = lambda". It works the same. One line. Same features. MUCH easier to the n00bz to read and understand. – S.Lott Nov 23 '08 at 13:45
  • 4
    @S.Lott: not if the n00bz come from scheme :P this isn't a real problem. there's even a keyword to google! what other features show we avoid for the sake of the n00bz? i guess yield isn't imperative/c-like enough to be n00b friendly either then. – Janus Troelsen May 11 '12 at 21:10
  • 10
    The function object resulting from def chunk instead of chunk=lambda has .__name__ attribute 'chunk' instead of '<lambda>'. The specific name is more useful in tracebacks. – Terry Jan Reedy Jun 27 '12 at 4:20
  • 1
    @Alfe: I'm not sure if could be called a main semantic difference, but whether there's a useful name in a traceback instead of <lamba> or not is, at least, a notable difference. – martineau Jan 11 '15 at 20:33
  • After testing a bunch of them for performance, THIS is great! – Sunny Patel Oct 5 at 16:36
def split_seq(seq, num_pieces):
    start = 0
    for i in xrange(num_pieces):
        stop = start + len(seq[i::num_pieces])
        yield seq[start:stop]
        start = stop

usage:

seq = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

for seq in split_seq(seq, 3):
    print seq

Another more explicit version.

def chunkList(initialList, chunkSize):
    """
    This function chunks a list into sub lists 
    that have a length equals to chunkSize.

    Example:
    lst = [3, 4, 9, 7, 1, 1, 2, 3]
    print(chunkList(lst, 3)) 
    returns
    [[3, 4, 9], [7, 1, 1], [2, 3]]
    """
    finalList = []
    for i in range(0, len(initialList), chunkSize):
        finalList.append(initialList[i:i+chunkSize])
    return finalList
  • (2016 Sep 12) This answer is the most language independent and easiest to read. – D Adams Sep 14 '16 at 0:36

Without calling len() which is good for large lists:

def splitter(l, n):
    i = 0
    chunk = l[:n]
    while chunk:
        yield chunk
        i += n
        chunk = l[i:i+n]

And this is for iterables:

def isplitter(l, n):
    l = iter(l)
    chunk = list(islice(l, n))
    while chunk:
        yield chunk
        chunk = list(islice(l, n))

The functional flavour of the above:

def isplitter2(l, n):
    return takewhile(bool,
                     (tuple(islice(start, n))
                            for start in repeat(iter(l))))

OR:

def chunks_gen_sentinel(n, seq):
    continuous_slices = imap(islice, repeat(iter(seq)), repeat(0), repeat(n))
    return iter(imap(tuple, continuous_slices).next,())

OR:

def chunks_gen_filter(n, seq):
    continuous_slices = imap(islice, repeat(iter(seq)), repeat(0), repeat(n))
    return takewhile(bool,imap(tuple, continuous_slices))
  • 15
    There is no reason to avoid len() on large lists; it's a constant-time operation. – Thomas Wouters May 30 '11 at 10:03

Consider using matplotlib.cbook pieces

for example:

import matplotlib.cbook as cbook
segments = cbook.pieces(np.arange(20), 3)
for s in segments:
     print s
a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
CHUNK = 4
[a[i*CHUNK:(i+1)*CHUNK] for i in xrange((len(a) + CHUNK - 1) / CHUNK )]
  • Can you explain more your answer please ? – Zulu Jul 16 '15 at 0:06
  • Let's work from backwards:(len(a) + CHUNK -1) / CHUNK – AdvilUser Jul 29 '15 at 0:22
  • Working from backwards: (len(a) + CHUNK -1) / CHUNK Gives you the number of chunks that you will end up with. Then, for each chunk at index i, we are generating a sub-array of the original array like this: a[ i * CHUNK : (i + 1) * CHUNK ] where, i * CHUNK is the index of the first element to put into the subarray, and, (i + 1) * CHUNK is 1 past the last element to put into the subarray. This solution uses list comprehension, so it might be faster for large arrays. – AdvilUser Jul 29 '15 at 0:29
  • sorry about the bad formatting.... I don't know how to make comments have nice formatting... – AdvilUser Jul 29 '15 at 0:29

At this point, I think we need the obligatory anonymous-recursive function.

Y = lambda f: (lambda x: x(x))(lambda y: f(lambda *args: y(y)(*args)))
chunks = Y(lambda f: lambda n: [n[0][:n[1]]] + f((n[0][n[1]:], n[1])) if len(n[0]) > 0 else [])
  • lambda function are slow. list comprehension would be faster – Sanjay Poongunran Jul 24 at 19:47
  • @SanjayPoongunran thanks for you feedback, but this is Python, we're not here for performance (we would write in C), but for readability. – Julien Palard Jul 24 at 22:29
  • 1
    @JulienPalard Oh yes, readability is what this reply is all about. – Ibolit Oct 16 at 7:44

Since everybody here talking about iterators. boltons has perfect method for that, called iterutils.chunked_iter.

from boltons import iterutils

list(iterutils.chunked_iter(list(range(50)), 11))

Output:

[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10],
 [11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21],
 [22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32],
 [33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43],
 [44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49]]

But if you don't want to be mercy on memory, you can use old-way and store the full list in the first place with iterutils.chunked.

  • And this one actually works regardless of order one looks at the subiterators!! – Peter Gerdes Dec 19 '17 at 10:32

One more solution

def make_chunks(data, chunk_size): 
    while data:
        chunk, data = data[:chunk_size], data[chunk_size:]
        yield chunk

>>> for chunk in make_chunks([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], 2):
...     print chunk
... 
[1, 2]
[3, 4]
[5, 6]
[7]
>>> 
def chunks(iterable,n):
    """assumes n is an integer>0
    """
    iterable=iter(iterable)
    while True:
        result=[]
        for i in range(n):
            try:
                a=next(iterable)
            except StopIteration:
                break
            else:
                result.append(a)
        if result:
            yield result
        else:
            break

g1=(i*i for i in range(10))
g2=chunks(g1,3)
print g2
'<generator object chunks at 0x0337B9B8>'
print list(g2)
'[[0, 1, 4], [9, 16, 25], [36, 49, 64], [81]]'
  • 1
    While this may not look as short or as pretty as many of the itertools based responses this one actually works if you want to print out the second sub-list before accessing the first, i.e., you can set i0=next(g2); i1=next(g2); and use i1 before using i0 and it doesn't break!! – Peter Gerdes Dec 19 '17 at 10:25

protected by Ashwini Chaudhary Aug 30 '13 at 14:59

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