2405

I have a list of arbitrary length, and I need to split it up into equal size chunks and operate on it. There are some obvious ways to do this, like keeping a counter and two lists, and when the second list fills up, add it to the first list and empty the second list for the next round of data, but this is potentially extremely expensive.

I was wondering if anyone had a good solution to this for lists of any length, e.g. using generators.

I was looking for something useful in itertools but I couldn't find anything obviously useful. Might've missed it, though.

Related question: What is the most “pythonic” way to iterate over a list in chunks?

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  • 3
    Before you post a new answer, consider there are already 60+ answers for this question. Please, make sure that your answer contributes information that is not among existing answers. – janniks Feb 3 at 12:17
  • 2
    For users that want to avoid an arbitrarily small final chunk, look over at Splitting a list into N parts of approximately equal length – wim Feb 20 at 21:15
  • @wim, that solution has been marked as not working since 2017. There was a rounding error causing certain requests to fail. – sanderdatema Jul 24 at 7:32
  • @sanderdatema Not the accepted answer. Review the other answers. – wim Jul 24 at 18:25
  • @wim Fair enough, but then you might want to add a comment here with a link to the correct answer, because it's not clear from your comment that you didn't mean the accepted answer and the link just points at the main question. I suppose you mean your own comment there? – sanderdatema Jul 24 at 19:42

64 Answers 64

5

As per this answer, the top-voted answer leaves a 'runt' at the end. Here's my solution to really get about as evenly-sized chunks as you can, with no runts. It basically tries to pick exactly the fractional spot where it should split the list, but just rounds it off to the nearest integer:

from __future__ import division  # not needed in Python 3
def n_even_chunks(l, n):
    """Yield n as even chunks as possible from l."""
    last = 0
    for i in range(1, n+1):
        cur = int(round(i * (len(l) / n)))
        yield l[last:cur]
        last = cur

Demonstration:

>>> pprint.pprint(list(n_even_chunks(list(range(100)), 9)))
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10],
 [11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21],
 [22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32],
 [33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43],
 [44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55],
 [56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66],
 [67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77],
 [78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88],
 [89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99]]
>>> pprint.pprint(list(n_even_chunks(list(range(100)), 11)))
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8],
 [9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17],
 [18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26],
 [27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35],
 [36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44],
 [45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54],
 [55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63],
 [64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72],
 [73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81],
 [82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90],
 [91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99]]

Compare to the top-voted chunks answer:

>>> pprint.pprint(list(chunks(list(range(100)), 100//9)))
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10],
 [11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21],
 [22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32],
 [33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43],
 [44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54],
 [55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65],
 [66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76],
 [77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87],
 [88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98],
 [99]]
>>> pprint.pprint(list(chunks(list(range(100)), 100//11)))
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8],
 [9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17],
 [18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26],
 [27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35],
 [36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44],
 [45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53],
 [54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62],
 [63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71],
 [72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80],
 [81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89],
 [90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98],
 [99]]
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  • 1
    This solution seems to fail in some situations: - when n > len(l) - for l = [0,1,2,3,4] and n=3 it returns [[0], [1], [2]] instead of [[0,1], [2,3], [4]] – DragonTux Sep 5 '16 at 10:45
  • @DragonTux: Ah I wrote the function for Python 3 - it gives [[0, 1], [2], [3, 4]]. I added the future import so it works in Python 2 as well – Claudiu Sep 5 '16 at 17:24
  • 1
    Thanks a lot. I keep forgetting the subtle differences between Python 2 and 3. – DragonTux Sep 9 '16 at 15:18
5

One more solution

def make_chunks(data, chunk_size): 
    while data:
        chunk, data = data[:chunk_size], data[chunk_size:]
        yield chunk

>>> for chunk in make_chunks([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], 2):
...     print chunk
... 
[1, 2]
[3, 4]
[5, 6]
[7]
>>> 
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4

I realise this question is old (stumbled over it on Google), but surely something like the following is far simpler and clearer than any of the huge complex suggestions and only uses slicing:

def chunker(iterable, chunksize):
    for i,c in enumerate(iterable[::chunksize]):
        yield iterable[i*chunksize:(i+1)*chunksize]

>>> for chunk in chunker(range(0,100), 10):
...     print list(chunk)
... 
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19]
[20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29]
... etc ...
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4

letting r be the chunk size and L be the initial list, you can do.

chunkL = [ [i for i in L[r*k:r*(k+1)] ] for k in range(len(L)/r)] 
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4

Use list comprehensions:

l = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12]
k = 5 #chunk size
print [tuple(l[x:y]) for (x, y) in [(x, x+k) for x in range(0, len(l), k)]]
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4

You could use numpy's array_split function e.g., np.array_split(np.array(data), 20) to split into 20 nearly equal size chunks.

To make sure chunks are exactly equal in size use np.split.

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3
def chunk(lst):
    out = []
    for x in xrange(2, len(lst) + 1):
        if not len(lst) % x:
            factor = len(lst) / x
            break
    while lst:
        out.append([lst.pop(0) for x in xrange(factor)])
    return out
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3

I wrote a small library expressly for this purpose, available here. The library's chunked function is particularly efficient because it's implemented as a generator, so a substantial amount of memory can be saved in certain situations. It also doesn't rely on the slice notation, so any arbitrary iterator can be used.

import iterlib

print list(iterlib.chunked(xrange(1, 1000), 10))
# prints [(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10), (11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20), ...]
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3

The answer above (by koffein) has a little problem: the list is always split into an equal number of splits, not equal number of items per partition. This is my version. The "// chs + 1" takes into account that the number of items may not be divideable exactly by the partition size, so the last partition will only be partially filled.

# Given 'l' is your list

chs = 12 # Your chunksize
partitioned = [ l[i*chs:(i*chs)+chs] for i in range((len(l) // chs)+1) ]
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  • But if the chunk size does exactly divide the number of elements then this includes a zero-length list at the end. – Arthur Tacca Dec 3 '18 at 15:34
3

At this point, I think we need the obligatory anonymous-recursive function.

Y = lambda f: (lambda x: x(x))(lambda y: f(lambda *args: y(y)(*args)))
chunks = Y(lambda f: lambda n: [n[0][:n[1]]] + f((n[0][n[1]:], n[1])) if len(n[0]) > 0 else [])
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  • lambda function are slow. list comprehension would be faster – Sanjay Poongunran Jul 24 '18 at 19:47
  • @SanjayPoongunran thanks for you feedback, but this is Python, we're not here for performance (we would write in C), but for readability. – Julien Palard Jul 24 '18 at 22:29
  • 5
    @JulienPalard Oh yes, readability is what this reply is all about. – Ibolit Oct 16 '18 at 7:44
3

Here's an idea using itertools.groupby:

def chunks(l, n):
    c = itertools.count()
    return (it for _, it in itertools.groupby(l, lambda x: next(c)//n))

This returns a generator of generators. If you want a list of lists, just replace the last line with

    return [list(it) for _, it in itertools.groupby(l, lambda x: next(c)//n)]

Example returning list of lists:

>>> chunks('abcdefghij', 4)
[['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'], ['e', 'f', 'g', 'h'], ['i', 'j']]

(So yes, this suffers form the "runt problem", which may or may not be a problem in a given situation.)

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  • Again this fails if the sub-iterators are not evaluated in order in the generator case. Let c = chunks('abcdefghij', 4) (as generator). Then set i0 = next(c); i1 = next(c); list(i1) //FINE; list(i0) //UHHOH – Peter Gerdes Dec 19 '17 at 10:19
  • @PeterGerdes, thank you for noting that omission; I forgot because I always used the groupby generators in order. The documentation does mention this limitation: "Because the source is shared, when the groupby() object is advanced, the previous group is no longer visible." – itub Dec 19 '17 at 16:12
  • @PeterGerdes I think this can be solved using enumerate instead, like so: [[x for _, x in it] for _, it in itertools.groupby(enumerate(l), lambda x: x[0]//n)] (list(it) is a list of (index, element) pairs due to enumerate) – Yuri Feldman May 13 '19 at 18:18
3

I don't think I saw this option, so just to add another one :)) :

def chunks(iterable, chunk_size):
  i = 0;
  while i < len(iterable):
    yield iterable[i:i+chunk_size]
    i += chunk_size
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3

I have one solution below which does work but more important than that solution is a few comments on other approaches. First, a good solution shouldn't require that one loop through the sub-iterators in order. If I run

g = paged_iter(list(range(50)), 11))
i0 = next(g)
i1 = next(g)
list(i1)
list(i0)

The appropriate output for the last command is

 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

not

 []

As most of the itertools based solutions here return. This isn't just the usual boring restriction about accessing iterators in order. Imagine a consumer trying to clean up poorly entered data which reversed the appropriate order of blocks of 5, i.e., the data looks like [B5, A5, D5, C5] and should look like [A5, B5, C5, D5] (where A5 is just five elements not a sublist). This consumer would look at the claimed behavior of the grouping function and not hesitate to write a loop like

i = 0
out = []
for it in paged_iter(data,5)
    if (i % 2 == 0):
         swapped = it
    else: 
         out += list(it)
         out += list(swapped)
    i = i + 1

This will produce mysteriously wrong results if you sneakily assume that sub-iterators are always fully used in order. It gets even worse if you want to interleave elements from the chunks.

Second, a decent number of the suggested solutions implicitly rely on the fact that iterators have a deterministic order (they don't e.g. set) and while some of the solutions using islice may be ok it worries me.

Third, the itertools grouper approach works but the recipe relies on internal behavior of the zip_longest (or zip) functions that isn't part of their published behavior. In particular, the grouper function only works because in zip_longest(i0...in) the next function is always called in order next(i0), next(i1), ... next(in) before starting over. As grouper passes n copies of the same iterator object it relies on this behavior.

Finally, while the solution below can be improved if you make the assumption criticized above that sub-iterators are accessed in order and fully perused without this assumption one MUST implicitly (via call chain) or explicitly (via deques or other data structure) store elements for each subiterator somewhere. So don't bother wasting time (as I did) assuming one could get around this with some clever trick.

def paged_iter(iterat, n):
    itr = iter(iterat)
    deq = None
    try:
        while(True):
            deq = collections.deque(maxlen=n)
            for q in range(n):
                deq.append(next(itr))
            yield (i for i in deq)
    except StopIteration:
        yield (i for i in deq)
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3

python pydash package could be a good choice.

from pydash.arrays import chunk
ids = ['22', '89', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10', '11', '1']
chunk_ids = chunk(ids,5)
print(chunk_ids)
# output: [['22', '89', '2', '3', '4'], ['5', '6', '7', '8', '9'], ['10', '11', '1']]

for more checkout pydash chunk list

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  • neat! and this is what actualy sits under the hood of pydash.arrays.chunk: chunks = int(ceil(len(array) / float(size))) return [array[i * size:(i + 1) * size] for i in range(chunks)] – darkman Mar 27 at 14:47
3
>>> def f(x, n, acc=[]): return f(x[n:], n, acc+[(x[:n])]) if x else acc
>>> f("Hallo Welt", 3)
['Hal', 'lo ', 'Wel', 't']
>>> 

If you are into brackets - I picked up a book on Erlang :)

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2
  • Works with any iterable
  • Inner data is generator object (not a list)
  • One liner
In [259]: get_in_chunks = lambda itr,n: ( (v for _,v in g) for _,g in itertools.groupby(enumerate(itr),lambda (ind,_): ind/n))

In [260]: list(list(x) for x in get_in_chunks(range(30),7))
Out[260]:
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6],
 [7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13],
 [14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20],
 [21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27],
 [28, 29]]
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  • g = get_in_chunks(range(30),7); i0=next(g);i1=next(g);list(i1);list(i0); Last evaluation is empty. Hidden requirement about accessing all the sublists in order seems really bad here to me because the goal with these kind of utils is often to shuffle data around in various ways. – Peter Gerdes Dec 19 '17 at 10:30
2

Like @AaronHall I got here looking for roughly evenly sized chunks. There are different interpretations of that. In my case, if the desired size is N, I would like each group to be of size>=N. Thus, the orphans which are created in most of the above should be redistributed to other groups.

This can be done using:

def nChunks(l, n):
    """ Yield n successive chunks from l.
    Works for lists,  pandas dataframes, etc
    """
    newn = int(1.0 * len(l) / n + 0.5)
    for i in xrange(0, n-1):
        yield l[i*newn:i*newn+newn]
    yield l[n*newn-newn:]

(from Splitting a list of into N parts of approximately equal length) by simply calling it as nChunks(l,l/n) or nChunks(l,floor(l/n))

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  • seems to yield some empty chunks (len=26, 10) , or a final very unbalanced chunk (len=26, 11). – idij Nov 27 '14 at 13:11
2

I have come up to following solution without creation temorary list object, which should work with any iterable object. Please note that this version for Python 2.x:

def chunked(iterable, size):
    stop = []
    it = iter(iterable)
    def _next_chunk():
        try:
            for _ in xrange(size):
                yield next(it)
        except StopIteration:
            stop.append(True)
            return

    while not stop:
        yield _next_chunk()

for it in chunked(xrange(16), 4):
   print list(it)

Output:

[0, 1, 2, 3]
[4, 5, 6, 7]
[8, 9, 10, 11]
[12, 13, 14, 15] 
[]

As you can see if len(iterable) % size == 0 then we have additional empty iterator object. But I do not think that it is big problem.

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  • What do you think the following code should produce? i=0 – Peter Gerdes Dec 19 '17 at 10:03
  • Try only executing list(it) on every other iteration through the loop, i.e. add a counter and check if it 0 mod 2. The expected behavior is to only print every other line of your output. The actual behavior is to print every line. – Peter Gerdes Dec 19 '17 at 10:10
2

No magic, but simple and correct:

def chunks(iterable, n):
    """Yield successive n-sized chunks from iterable."""
    values = []
    for i, item in enumerate(iterable, 1):
        values.append(item)
        if i % n == 0:
            yield values
            values = []
    if values:
        yield values
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1

Since I had to do something like this, here's my solution given a generator and a batch size:

def pop_n_elems_from_generator(g, n):
    elems = []
    try:
        for idx in xrange(0, n):
            elems.append(g.next())
        return elems
    except StopIteration:
        return elems
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1

This works in v2/v3, is inlineable, generator-based and uses only the standard library:

import itertools
def split_groups(iter_in, group_size):
    return ((x for _, x in item) for _, item in itertools.groupby(enumerate(iter_in), key=lambda x: x[0] // group_size))
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  • Just do a (list(x) for x in split_groups('abcdefghij', 4)), then iterate through them: as opposed to many examples here this would work with groups of any size. – Andrey Cizov Feb 24 '18 at 21:55
1

An abstraction would be

l = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]
n = 3
outList = []
for i in range(n, len(l) + n, n):
    outList.append(l[i-n:i])

print(outList)

This will print:

[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]

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0

I dislike idea of splitting elements by chunk size, e.g. script can devide 101 to 3 chunks as [50, 50, 1]. For my needs I needed spliting proportionly, and keeping order same. First I wrote my own script, which works fine, and it's very simple. But I've seen later this answer, where script is better than mine, I reccomend it. Here's my script:

def proportional_dividing(N, n):
    """
    N - length of array (bigger number)
    n - number of chunks (smaller number)
    output - arr, containing N numbers, diveded roundly to n chunks
    """
    arr = []
    if N == 0:
        return arr
    elif n == 0:
        arr.append(N)
        return arr
    r = N // n
    for i in range(n-1):
        arr.append(r)
    arr.append(N-r*(n-1))

    last_n = arr[-1]
    # last number always will be r <= last_n < 2*r
    # when last_n == r it's ok, but when last_n > r ...
    if last_n > r:
        # ... and if difference too big (bigger than 1), then
        if abs(r-last_n) > 1:
            #[2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 7] # N=29, n=12
            # we need to give unnecessary numbers to first elements back
            diff = last_n - r
            for k in range(diff):
                arr[k] += 1
            arr[-1] = r
            # and we receive [3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2]
    return arr

def split_items(items, chunks):
    arr = proportional_dividing(len(items), chunks)
    splitted = []
    for chunk_size in arr:
        splitted.append(items[:chunk_size])
        items = items[chunk_size:]
    print(splitted)
    return splitted

items = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11]
chunks = 3
split_items(items, chunks)
split_items(['a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','g','k','l', 'm'], 3)
split_items(['a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','g','k','l', 'm', 'n'], 3)
split_items(range(100), 4)
split_items(range(99), 4)
split_items(range(101), 4)

and output:

[[1, 2, 3, 4], [5, 6, 7, 8], [9, 10, 11]]
[['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'], ['e', 'f', 'g', 'h'], ['i', 'g', 'k', 'l', 'm']]
[['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'], ['f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'g'], ['k', 'l', 'm', 'n']]
[range(0, 25), range(25, 50), range(50, 75), range(75, 100)]
[range(0, 25), range(25, 50), range(50, 75), range(75, 99)]
[range(0, 25), range(25, 50), range(50, 75), range(75, 101)]
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0

If you don't care about the order:

> from itertools import groupby
> batch_no = 3
> data = 'abcdefgh'

> [
    [x[1] for x in x[1]] 
    for x in 
    groupby(
      sorted(
        (x[0] % batch_no, x[1]) 
        for x in 
        enumerate(data)
      ),
      key=lambda x: x[0]
    )
  ]

[['a', 'd', 'g'], ['b', 'e', 'h'], ['c', 'f']]

This solution doesn't generates sets of same size, but distributes values so batches are as big as possible while keeping the number of generated batches.

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0

A generic chunker for any iterable, which gives the user a choice of how to handle a partial chunk at the end.

Tested on Python 3.

chunker.py

from enum import Enum

class PartialChunkOptions(Enum):
    INCLUDE = 0
    EXCLUDE = 1
    PAD = 2
    ERROR = 3

class PartialChunkException(Exception):
    pass

def chunker(iterable, n, on_partial=PartialChunkOptions.INCLUDE, pad=None):
    """
    A chunker yielding n-element lists from an iterable, with various options
    about what to do about a partial chunk at the end.

    on_partial=PartialChunkOptions.INCLUDE (the default):
                     include the partial chunk as a short (<n) element list

    on_partial=PartialChunkOptions.EXCLUDE
                     do not include the partial chunk

    on_partial=PartialChunkOptions.PAD
                     pad to an n-element list 
                     (also pass pad=<pad_value>, default None)

    on_partial=PartialChunkOptions.ERROR
                     raise a RuntimeError if a partial chunk is encountered
    """

    on_partial = PartialChunkOptions(on_partial)        

    iterator = iter(iterable)
    while True:
        vals = []
        for i in range(n):
            try:
                vals.append(next(iterator))
            except StopIteration:
                if vals:
                    if on_partial == PartialChunkOptions.INCLUDE:
                        yield vals
                    elif on_partial == PartialChunkOptions.EXCLUDE:
                        pass
                    elif on_partial == PartialChunkOptions.PAD:
                        yield vals + [pad] * (n - len(vals))
                    elif on_partial == PartialChunkOptions.ERROR:
                        raise PartialChunkException
                    return
                return
        yield vals

test.py

import chunker

chunk_size = 3

for it in (range(100, 107),
          range(100, 109)):

    print("\nITERABLE TO CHUNK: {}".format(it))
    print("CHUNK SIZE: {}".format(chunk_size))

    for option in chunker.PartialChunkOptions.__members__.values():
        print("\noption {} used".format(option))
        try:
            for chunk in chunker.chunker(it, chunk_size, on_partial=option):
                print(chunk)
        except chunker.PartialChunkException:
            print("PartialChunkException was raised")
    print("")

output of test.py


ITERABLE TO CHUNK: range(100, 107)
CHUNK SIZE: 3

option PartialChunkOptions.INCLUDE used
[100, 101, 102]
[103, 104, 105]
[106]

option PartialChunkOptions.EXCLUDE used
[100, 101, 102]
[103, 104, 105]

option PartialChunkOptions.PAD used
[100, 101, 102]
[103, 104, 105]
[106, None, None]

option PartialChunkOptions.ERROR used
[100, 101, 102]
[103, 104, 105]
PartialChunkException was raised


ITERABLE TO CHUNK: range(100, 109)
CHUNK SIZE: 3

option PartialChunkOptions.INCLUDE used
[100, 101, 102]
[103, 104, 105]
[106, 107, 108]

option PartialChunkOptions.EXCLUDE used
[100, 101, 102]
[103, 104, 105]
[106, 107, 108]

option PartialChunkOptions.PAD used
[100, 101, 102]
[103, 104, 105]
[106, 107, 108]

option PartialChunkOptions.ERROR used
[100, 101, 102]
[103, 104, 105]
[106, 107, 108]

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0

This question reminds me of the Raku (formerly Perl 6) .comb(n) method. It breaks up strings into n-sized chunks. (There's more to it than that, but I'll leave out the details.)

It's easy enough to implement a similar function in Python3 as a lambda expression:

comb = lambda s,n: (s[i:i+n] for i in range(0,len(s),n))

Then you can call it like this:

some_list = list(range(0, 20))  # creates a list of 20 elements
generator = comb(some_list, 4)  # creates a generator that will generate lists of 4 elements
for sublist in generator:
    print(sublist)  # prints a sublist of four elements, as it's generated

Of course, you don't have to assign the generator to a variable; you can just loop over it directly like this:

for sublist in comb(some_list, 4):
    print(sublist)  # prints a sublist of four elements, as it's generated

As a bonus, this comb() function also operates on strings:

list( comb('catdogant', 3) )  # returns ['cat', 'dog', 'ant']
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0

I've created these two fancy one-liners which are efficient and lazy, both input and output are iterables, also they doen't depend on any module:

First one-liner is totally lazy meaning that it returns iterator producing iterators (i.e. each chunk produced is iterator iterating over chunk's elements), this version is good for the case if chunks are very large or elements are produced slowly one by one and should become available immediately as they are produced:

Try it online!

chunk_iters = lambda it, n: ((e for i, g in enumerate(((f,), cit)) for j, e in zip(range((1, n - 1)[i]), g)) for cit in (iter(it),) for f in cit)

Second one-liner returns iterator that produces lists. Each list is produced as soon as elements of whole chunk become available through input iterator or if very last element of last chunk is reached. This version should be used if input elements are produced fast or all available immediately. Other wise first more-lazy one-liner version should be used.

Try it online!

chunk_lists = lambda it, n: (l for l in ([],) for i, g in enumerate((it, ((),))) for e in g for l in (l[:len(l) % n] + [e][:1 - i],) if (len(l) % n == 0) != i)

Also I provide multi-line version of first chunk_iters one-liner, which returns iterator producing another iterators (going through each chunk's elements):

Try it online!

def chunk_iters(it, n):
    cit = iter(it)
    def one_chunk(f):
        yield f
        for i, e in zip(range(n - 1), cit):
            yield e
    for f in cit:
        yield one_chunk(f)
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-1

You can use Dask to split a list into evenly sized chunks. Dask has the added benefit of memory conservation which is best for very large data. For best results you should load your list directly into a dask dataframe to conserve memory if your list is very large. Depending on what exactly you want to do with the lists, Dask has an entire API of functions you can use: http://docs.dask.org/en/latest/dataframe-api.html

import pandas as pd
import dask.dataframe as dd 

split = 4
my_list = range(100)
df = dd.from_pandas(pd.DataFrame(my_list), npartitions = split)
my_list = [ df.get_partition(n).compute().iloc[:,0].tolist() for n in range(split) ]

# [[1,2,3,..],[26,27,28...],[51,52,53...],[76,77,78...]]
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-1

Lazy loading version

import pprint
pprint.pprint(list(chunks(range(10, 75), 10)))
[range(10, 20),
 range(20, 30),
 range(30, 40),
 range(40, 50),
 range(50, 60),
 range(60, 70),
 range(70, 75)]

Confer this implementation's result with the example usage result of the accepted answer.

Many of the above functions assume that the length of the whole iterable are known up front, or at least are cheap to calculate.

For some streamed objects that would mean loading the full data into memory first (e.g. to download the whole file) to get the length information.

If you however don't know the the full size yet, you can use this code instead:

def chunks(iterable, size):
    """
    Yield successive chunks from iterable, being `size` long.

    https://stackoverflow.com/a/55776536/3423324
    :param iterable: The object you want to split into pieces.
    :param size: The size each of the resulting pieces should have.
    """
    i = 0
    while True:
        sliced = iterable[i:i + size]
        if len(sliced) == 0:
            # to suppress stuff like `range(max, max)`.
            break
        # end if
        yield sliced
        if len(sliced) < size:
            # our slice is not the full length, so we must have passed the end of the iterator
            break
        # end if
        i += size  # so we start the next chunk at the right place.
    # end while
# end def

This works because the slice command will return less/no elements if you passed the end of an iterable:

"abc"[0:2] == 'ab'
"abc"[2:4] == 'c'
"abc"[4:6] == ''

We now use that result of the slice, and calculate the length of that generated chunk. If it is less than what we expect, we know we can end the iteration.

That way the iterator will not be executed unless access.

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-1

An old school approach that does not require itertools but still works with arbitrary generators:

def chunks(g, n):
  """divide a generator 'g' into small chunks
  Yields:
    a chunk that has 'n' or less items
  """
  n = max(1, n)
  buff = []
  for item in g:
    buff.append(item)
    if len(buff) == n:
      yield buff
      buff = []
  if buff:
    yield buff
| |

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